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Old 11-06-2007, 11:21 PM
 
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I am thinking of relocating to Houston. The one thing I am concerned about is the hurricanes and the flooding. Can anyone tell me the neighborhoods that are most prone to flooding? (montrose, heights, west university, uptown, downtown, glenbrook valley, etc.) Also, which areas would I probably be most safe from flooding?
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Old 11-06-2007, 11:58 PM
 
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An insurance agent can tell you which areas are in the latest 100 year flood plain maps. They may also be able to check the history of claims as well on an individual house.

It can really vary. I know for example in Glenbrook Valley we have some slightly hilly terrain. You will have houses that have never flooded in the 50+ years they have been there, and across the street there will be one built into a "swale" where the front door is street level, but the garage is built underneath the house in the back and takes in water.

Some general areas are more flood prone than others, but it can vary significantly block-by-block and house by house.
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Old 11-07-2007, 06:38 AM
 
Location: A little suburb of Houston
3,700 posts, read 11,270,240 times
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Looking at the maps on this website will help: TSARP - View the Maps (http://www.tsarp.org/viewmaps.html - broken link)
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Old 11-07-2007, 07:56 AM
 
Location: 77059
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Areas around the Galleria (uptown) and downtown flood pretty bad in hard rains but drain off rather quickly. You'll be stuck late once a year if you work here, trust me. And it used to be Montrose and the areas around St. Thomas Univ. always flooded real bad whenever someone spit on the sidewalk. Not sure how it is anymore but it has been said for years that part of the city is slowly sinking.

As for hurricanes, stop worrying about them. Simply prepare for them every summer, carry suitable insurance, and plan an escape route... Seriously, what more can you do?? We haven't seen one worth mentioning since 1983. That and all your areas you mentioned are shielded more than enough by being 50 miles inland.

However you can bet on a WET tropical storm every 2 yrs or so. Floods are the main issue here. The rain falls sideways in 40-50 mph winds, umbrellas turn inside out, your house creaks a little, and the news media (Channel 2) creates hysteria.

But when an autumn cold front blows through with the same gusty wind and pouring rains, the media says "nice weather is on the way." Go figure.
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Old 11-07-2007, 10:24 AM
 
Location: A little suburb of Houston
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There is flooding and there is Flooding. By flooding, I mean what tstone talks about, typical street flooding. This happens quite frequently in all parts of Houston, flood plain or not. BTW, Montrose and Midtown streets still flood especially Richmond (can't wait to see the light rail stuck in that, what entertainment), Alabama and Westheimer are better but not great. Fortunately, Montrose street flooding doesn't seem to occur as often as other areas. Most Houston streets are designed to flood and provide secondary containment when storm sewers are inundated. The secondary containment prevents homes from flooding.
By Flooding, I mean that houses and businesses end taking on water. This does not happen that often but it does occur and some areas are more prone to it than others. Seems that it is most frequently associated with tropical storms (Erin was this year's flood causer but % wise was not that bad) but is not limited to just that (1994 floods for example). Check out the maps in the above link to see what areas are most prone.
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Old 11-07-2007, 11:17 AM
 
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Are areas closer to the water such as Clear Lake and Friensdwoods more at risk than areas further inland like Kingwood and Humble?
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Old 11-07-2007, 11:40 AM
 
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Houston overall drains from Northwest to Southeast. All the bayous and creeks drain into the gulf that way, so during flooding, the best drainage is the Northwest part of town while the last to drain is the Southeast part of town.

Also, during tropical storms, the closer to the coast, the more storm surge and greater intensity of storm. Even 40-60 miles in, the impact of tropical storms is greatly diminished than the first 10 miles or so.

The storm surge also pushes water UP into the drainage system, so those closer to the coast get it that way too.
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Old 11-07-2007, 12:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supermac34 View Post
Houston overall drains from Northwest to Southeast. All the bayous and creeks drain into the gulf that way, so during flooding, the best drainage is the Northwest part of town while the last to drain is the Southeast part of town.

Also, during tropical storms, the closer to the coast, the more storm surge and greater intensity of storm. Even 40-60 miles in, the impact of tropical storms is greatly diminished than the first 10 miles or so.

The storm surge also pushes water UP into the drainage system, so those closer to the coast get it that way too.
Thanks. Now I am doubting my decision to work in 77034 and live around there.
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Old 11-07-2007, 12:18 PM
 
Location: 77059
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77034 is north of Clear Lake and that will be a problem I think. In the adjacent 77062 part of Clear Lake I have yet to see any street flooding beyond pooling. We either have good drainage or we're on a very small hill. I'm in the 500 yr flood plain, too. The big problem is when we hear about flooding on the news, I can't get out of Clear Lake. To the north into 77034 and Pasadena is the worst, nor can I go west on 45/Beltway... and down south into Webster & League City has it's problems too.
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Old 11-07-2007, 01:20 PM
 
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It's too late for me now. I already signed the offer. No wonder those inland areas such Katy, Spring, Kingwoods, etc. are so popular with new comers.
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