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Old 08-21-2015, 08:58 AM
 
34,626 posts, read 20,262,700 times
Reputation: 22216

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowexpectations View Post
There isn't a debate and you sending a pm saying "yes it is a fact" isn't a debate nor does it make it a fact. Comical
Since you CHOOSE to continue here and not debate it via PM, that's fine.

Let's take a look at the numbers from YOUR link - https://www.census.gov/construction/...df/lotsize.pdf

If you look under 2014, you'll notice the number of new homes built and completed in the US were 620,000

171,000 - Under 7,000 - 27.6%
114,000 - 7,000 to 8,999 - 18.4%
65,000 - 9,000 to 10,999 - 10.5%
131,000 - 11,000 to 21.999 - 21.2%
138,000 - 22,000 and up - 22.3%

First, we can see that even though, technically, 7,000 falls in the second category, it's really, in practical terms, in the first group, the SMALLest sized lots.

Now, what size lot do you get when you average that out?

Let's assign the following to make the numbers easier.
6,000 - 27.6%
8,000 - 18.4%
10,000 - 10.5%
16,500 - 21.2%
23,000 - 22.3%

Now, just throw those numbers into two columns in an Excel spreadsheet and apply the following formula - =SUMPRODUCT(A1:A5, B1:B5)/SUM(B1:B5)

This will give you the average lot size which is 11,860 sq ft.

So, if 11,860 is the average, I think it's safe to say 7,000 is small considering it's only 59% the size of the average lot.

Additionally, if you look at YOUR link for our region, you'll find these numbers:

6,000 - 27.4%
8,000 - 20.1%
10,000 - 10.5%
16,500 - 21.3%
23,000 - 20.7%

So, in our region from YOUR link, the average lot size is 11,623 sq ft. Once again, if the average is 11,623 then 7,000 is considered SMALL.

You see, it's not opinion, it's math.
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Houston
581 posts, read 575,314 times
Reputation: 506
It still an opinion. Someone coming from a townhome in the Heights or Cottage Grove who sits on <2500sqft lot is going to think a 7000 sqft lot is massive. It's all about perspective. Therefore, your statement is an opinion, not a fact.

Stating a lot is exactly 7797sqft would be an example of a fact.
Stating a lot of exactly 7797 sqft is large or small, is an opinion.
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:08 AM
 
25,475 posts, read 19,506,122 times
Reputation: 21569
Quote:
Originally Posted by PedroMartinez View Post
Since you CHOOSE to continue here and not debate it via PM, that's fine.

Let's take a look at the numbers from YOUR link - https://www.census.gov/construction/...df/lotsize.pdf

If you look under 2014, you'll notice the number of new homes built and completed in the US were 620,000

171,000 - Under 7,000 - 27.6%
114,000 - 7,000 to 8,999 - 18.4%
65,000 - 9,000 to 10,999 - 10.5%
131,000 - 11,000 to 21.999 - 21.2%
138,000 - 22,000 and up - 22.3%

First, we can see that even though, technically, 7,000 falls in the second category, it's really, in practical terms, in the first group, the SMALLest sized lots.

Now, what size lot do you get when you average that out?

Let's assign the following to make the numbers easier.
6,000 - 27.6%
8,000 - 18.4%
10,000 - 10.5%
16,500 - 21.2%
23,000 - 22.3%

Now, just throw those numbers into two columns in an Excel spreadsheet and apply the following formula - =SUMPRODUCT(A1:A5, B1:B5)/SUM(B1:B5)

This will give you the average lot size which is 11,860 sq ft.

So, if 11,860 is the average, I think it's safe to say 7,000 is small considering it's only 59% the size of the average lot.

Additionally, if you look at YOUR link for our region, you'll find these numbers:

6,000 - 27.4%
8,000 - 20.1%
10,000 - 10.5%
16,500 - 21.3%
23,000 - 20.7%

So, in our region from YOUR link, the average lot size is 11,623 sq ft. Once again, if the average is 11,623 then 7,000 is considered SMALL.

You see, it's not opinion, it's math.


Looking at an average is your mistake, if the median is 7800, 7000 isn't small
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:42 AM
 
52 posts, read 63,338 times
Reputation: 35
I'm from Tokyo and a 7,000 sq. ft lot is huge in my opinion. My wife is from mexico city and she says it is gigantic in fact. I told her it is not in fact gigantic, just big. Our kids grew up in an apartment here in Houston and now think our 8,000 sq ft lot is MONSTROUS!
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:53 AM
 
34,626 posts, read 20,262,700 times
Reputation: 22216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowexpectations View Post
Looking at an average is your mistake, if the median is 7800, 7000 isn't small
Actually, the median lot range would be 9,000 to 10,999.

You do know what median is, don't you?
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:56 AM
 
34,626 posts, read 20,262,700 times
Reputation: 22216
Quote:
Originally Posted by kickingprop View Post
Stating a lot is exactly 7797sqft would be an example of a fact.
Stating a lot of exactly 7797 sqft is large or small, is an opinion.
Actually, no.

There is a definition of small.

Small - definition of small by The Free Dictionary

Quote:
adj. small·er, small·est 1. a. Being below average in size:
If the AVERAGE size is 11,623, would 7,000 be below that average?
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:57 AM
 
52 posts, read 63,338 times
Reputation: 35
If I had to live out there in the boonies in Atascacita I would consider an 18,000 sq ft lot to be tiny. Anything over an acre would be decent size.
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Old 08-21-2015, 10:02 AM
 
34,626 posts, read 20,262,700 times
Reputation: 22216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Htown homie View Post
If I had to live out there in the boonies in Atascacita I would consider an 18,000 sq ft lot to be tiny. Anything over an acre would be decent size.
If we are discussing the Atascocita area, it might be considered tiny.

What is the average lot size in Atascocita? We can see where it falls, because I really don't know. I may have a tiny, pretty small, small, medium, large, really large or huge lot for that area, but without knowing the average size, I can't really say.

Now, if we're talking about lot size for our region based upon the numbers in Lowexpection's data, I have a larger lot than the average lot and my lot also would be in the range higher than the median range as well. The same would go for the data Lowexpectations provided for the US as well.
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Old 08-21-2015, 10:11 AM
 
52 posts, read 63,338 times
Reputation: 35
But we are not talking about our region. We are talking inside the loop in the 4th largest city in the country. For example, in manhattan 7,000 sq ft is huge and worth millions. In Poughkeepsie, not so much.
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Old 08-21-2015, 10:22 AM
 
34,626 posts, read 20,262,700 times
Reputation: 22216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Htown homie View Post
But we are not talking about our region. We are talking inside the loop in the 4th largest city in the country. For example, in manhattan 7,000 sq ft is huge and worth millions. In Poughkeepsie, not so much.
When did they move Oak Forest inside the loop?

The last time I drove past, it was still located outside the loop.

I'm curious, did they move 610 or relocate Oak Forest?
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