U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 10-22-2015, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
6,582 posts, read 6,001,023 times
Reputation: 3338

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
No, they've spent time in Galveston and at the Kemah boardwalk, but they've never been on the water, which is my point- many people in Houston consider the entire Bay area to be Galveston and nothing more, and Galveston only as a beach destination for the day. A place to get in and out of. Not a place that is a real, integrated part of this community. I certainly grew up with that perception on the Southwest side.

It brings back the original question posed at the start of this thread...Why didn't Houston and Galveston grow towards each other instead of the large undeveloped gap that still exists between the two? If it had, we would have a metro area that embraces its Gulf location much more. And, I think many of the reasons posted in this thread (hurricane, flooding threats chief among them) outline why. I also think the incredible shallowness of the Bay and the Lake are a factor. It really limits options to utilize the Bay, based on my experience living in other coastal areas.
But the Bay is dredged all the way to the Houston Ship Channel and then the Houston Ship Channel is dredged all the way to around 610 or a liitle past it.

So the whole bay is not shallow, but there are portions that are.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-22-2015, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 1,703,899 times
Reputation: 4038
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
But the Bay is dredged all the way to the Houston Ship Channel and then the Houston Ship Channel is dredged all the way to around 610 or a liitle past it.

So the whole bay is not shallow, but there are portions that are.
It's dredged for the shipping traffic, but much of the Bay that is frequented by recreational boaters is pretty shallow. We haven't yet looked at the maps, but I'm fairly certain you cannot take your boat into the main shipping lanes past a certain point on the Houston Ship channel without running afoul of the law. My only other experience owning a boat was in Jacksonville, FL where there were a lot more deep waterways hospitable to a boater- the Intracoastal, the St. John's river in downtown, and, of course, the ocean.

I think with more exploration, we will find more options, though.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 04:02 PM
Status: "Play ball !" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
3,794 posts, read 3,320,524 times
Reputation: 3033
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
It's dredged for the shipping traffic, but much of the Bay that is frequented by recreational boaters is pretty shallow. We haven't yet looked at the maps, but I'm fairly certain you cannot take your boat into the main shipping lanes past a certain point on the Houston Ship channel without running afoul of the law. My only other experience owning a boat was in Jacksonville, FL where there were a lot more deep waterways hospitable to a boater- the Intracoastal, the St. John's river in downtown, and, of course, the ocean.

I think with more exploration, we will find more options, though.
The natural depth of Galveston Bay is 6 to 12 feet that's about what people in the Florida keys and Bahama's deal with, so I don't think the shallow water is as much of an obstacle as you may think.

Here is a link to a discussion about boat drafts in shallow water that may be helpful.

Challenge of a 6 Foot Draft in the Keys and Bahamas - Cruisers & Sailing Forums
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 04:27 PM
Status: "Play ball !" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
3,794 posts, read 3,320,524 times
Reputation: 3033
Quote:
Originally Posted by DejaBlue View Post
I think it's the port problem. I don't know when but I think once Houston became the world port and the refineries started developing, housing and retail moved away.

Florida gets hurricanes and is actually stretched down into the gulf but South Florida is really built up.

If they had pushed for Galveston to be a big tourism area before the port turned Galveston into a soupy brown mess it would have been a hot spot.
Are you saying that the dredging of the Ship Channel is what causes the water in Galveston Bay to be murky ?

Galveston was still a hot spot up until the 1950's when the Texas rangers invaded Galveston in order to close down the gambling and prostitution. They just couldn't stand people having too much fun

Quote:
Originally Posted by LocalPlanner View Post
One issue that may factor into hindrances to Galveston's development (it certainly does today at least) is water supply. The Galveston County cities, particularly the island, don't have a good natural fresh water supply, and have to import it from the Gulf Coast Water Authority, which gets it primarily from the Brazos River. If the population of Houston was centered more in Galveston County, I would think the fresh water infrastructure that would have had to have been built would be an order of magnitude more substantial than we has been built to serve Houston today, primarily from the San Jacinto and Trinity Rivers which are very far from Galveston.
Yes, Galveston drinking water is the worst. I had a condo down there a while ago and when I stayed I dreaded having to use the tap water there at best it was chalky and at worst smelled of sulphur.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
No, they've spent time in Galveston and at the Kemah boardwalk, but they've never been on the water, which is my point- many people in Houston consider the entire Bay area to be Galveston and nothing more, and Galveston only as a beach destination for the day. A place to get in and out of. Not a place that is a real, integrated part of this community. I certainly grew up with that perception on the Southwest side.

It brings back the original question posed at the start of this thread...Why didn't Houston and Galveston grow towards each other instead of the large undeveloped gap that still exists between the two? If it had, we would have a metro area that embraces its Gulf location much more. And, I think many of the reasons posted in this thread (hurricane, flooding threats chief among them) outline why. I also think the incredible shallowness of the Bay and the Lake are a factor. It really limits options to utilize the Bay, based on my experience living in other coastal areas.
Yea like I said there is a "the other side of town" mentality in various parts of the Houston area. I spent my High School and early adult years in Southwest Houston as well at a time when saying you lived in southwest Houston really impressed people, and pretty much anything east of Main or north of I-10 was someplace else. We would say somebody lives in Spring Branch as if that was not Houston or people who lived in Southeast Houston (Gulfgate) were in Pasadena. I understand what you are saying I just don't think that separates Houston from the Coastal areas as much as you seem to think it does. if it does you can say that People ITL are separate from the rest of us and live in a different city as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Well, it's far from the Gulf if you go directly south or southwest but not if you go southeast from New Orlean. The Eastern edge (in New Orleans East, part of the city limits) touches Lake Borgne which is really like a Bay in the Gulf:

https://www.google.com/maps/@30.0232...8553695,11.71z
OK but again is it a major city ?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 04:48 PM
 
6,051 posts, read 8,006,602 times
Reputation: 2737
I do not know why Houston has not expanded more South towards Manvel and Southeast towards Dickinson also Southwet to like Needville . Houston has expanded north all the way to New Waverly not the city limits South areas not so much.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Texas
2,703 posts, read 1,703,899 times
Reputation: 4038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Lance View Post


Yea like I said there is a "the other side of town" mentality in various parts of the Houston area. I spent my High School and early adult years in Southwest Houston as well at a time when saying you lived in southwest Houston really impressed people, and pretty much anything east of Main or north of I-10 was someplace else. We would say somebody lives in Spring Branch as if that was not Houston or people who lived in Southeast Houston (Gulfgate) were in Pasadena. I understand what you are saying I just don't think that separates Houston from the Coastal areas as much as you seem to think it does. if it does you can say that People ITL are separate from the rest of us and live in a different city as well.
I agree that the various quadrants of the Houston metro area aren't as familiar with others as you see in some cities. After growing up in SW Houston and coming back after grad school, I hung out in my neck of the woods for about 3 years, and then moved in with my boyfriend (now husband of 14 years). We found a little bungalow in the Heights. I was very nervous about living there initially. I had never even been there before, but heard it was an old, run down part of town. I was very uninformed about what was a very historic part of my own city, not to mention wrong in my perceptions.

As I have gotten older, and lived several other places, I really think more in terms of MSA, not city. To me, ITL, Katy, Sugarland, The Woodlands, Clear Lake.....it's all Houston. Many other people don't think on this macro a scale, I suppose.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
6,582 posts, read 6,001,023 times
Reputation: 3338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Lance View Post
Are you saying that the dredging of the Ship Channel is what causes the water in Galveston Bay to be murky ?

Galveston was still a hot spot up until the 1950's when the Texas rangers invaded Galveston in order to close down the gambling and prostitution. They just couldn't stand people having too much fun



Yes, Galveston drinking water is the worst. I had a condo down there a while ago and when I stayed I dreaded having to use the tap water there at best it was chalky and at worst smelled of sulphur.



Yea like I said there is a "the other side of town" mentality in various parts of the Houston area. I spent my High School and early adult years in Southwest Houston as well at a time when saying you lived in southwest Houston really impressed people, and pretty much anything east of Main or north of I-10 was someplace else. We would say somebody lives in Spring Branch as if that was not Houston or people who lived in Southeast Houston (Gulfgate) were in Pasadena. I understand what you are saying I just don't think that separates Houston from the Coastal areas as much as you seem to think it does. if it does you can say that People ITL are separate from the rest of us and live in a different city as well.



OK but again is it a major city ?
1.2 million in the metro. Akin to San Antonio or Austin being on the coast. A lot larger than Corpus Christi.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 05:49 PM
Status: "Play ball !" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
3,794 posts, read 3,320,524 times
Reputation: 3033
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Ag 93 View Post
I agree that the various quadrants of the Houston metro area aren't as familiar with others as you see in some cities. After growing up in SW Houston and coming back after grad school, I hung out in my neck of the woods for about 3 years, and then moved in with my boyfriend (now husband of 14 years). We found a little bungalow in the Heights. I was very nervous about living there initially. I had never even been there before, but heard it was an old, run down part of town. I was very uninformed about what was a very historic part of my own city, not to mention wrong in my perceptions.

As I have gotten older, and lived several other places, I really think more in terms of MSA, not city. To me, ITL, Katy, Sugarland, The Woodlands, Clear Lake.....it's all Houston. Many other people don't think on this macro a scale, I suppose.
Yea the Heights has a whole diametrically different image from what it did back in the 80's when I first met people who lived there. Well things do change don't they ? I too think in terms of the MSA, or Greater Houston, or the old Stallworth Houston/Galveston area. I think we can agree that its a more mature way of seeing things
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 05:57 PM
Status: "Play ball !" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
3,794 posts, read 3,320,524 times
Reputation: 3033
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
1.2 million in the metro. Akin to San Antonio or Austin being on the coast. A lot larger than Corpus Christi.
I don't think 1.2 million is a major MSA these days . and where exactly the coast of southern Louisiana is, is in a constant state of flux, its that ambiguous.

If you look at the northeast US you see that the southernmost major cities Washington, Baltimore and Philly are all inland from the coast. Going south Atlanta is way inland as is Charlotte its not until you get into Florida that a major city is on the coast and that is mostly due to the fact that those are tourist and retirement metros that have a economy that feeds off actually being on the coast.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2015, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
6,582 posts, read 6,001,023 times
Reputation: 3338
Myrtle Beach, Charleston, Savannah, Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, Mobile, New Orleans, Galveston, Corpus Christi

All of those other cities are larger than Galveston. It could be argued that Corpus is the largest city on the Texas Gulf Coast since Houston technically isn't. If you count MSAs then yes, but Houston is the only MSA that touches the coast but isn't centered at the coast. New Orleans is probably the closest to not being right on the coast, but its city limits touches the coast so technically that counts.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2013 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top