U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-08-2018, 12:06 AM
 
4,278 posts, read 7,894,469 times
Reputation: 1552

Advertisements

I've heard suburban buyers are less tolerant of crime and grime being near where they are. The fact that the houses in those areas of the central city are still expensive shows the priorities of urban v. suburban buyers.

Remember that 288 divides the Almeda Road area from the bulk of the Third Ward...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DejaBlue View Post
But again, no one is paying an arm and leg for those home prices.


It's an apples to oranges comparison.


One of my friends lives in a nice complex off Almeda yet 3rd Ward is down the street. Pass! Though I love her place, for the price and the amount of homeless and that proximity it's not worth it, IMO. For me at least.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-08-2018, 09:17 PM
 
1,142 posts, read 520,619 times
Reputation: 1816
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMoreYouKnow View Post
Was that a typo or are you really trying to say that you live on a large lot? That's a little over 100' x 100', once you drop a ~2.5K sq foot home on that you've got just enough grass left for an overpriced boutique puppy to **** on and a driveway.
The lot is 10,750 sq ft. It's something like 150 ft long by 72 ft wide. For Houston, it's a good sized lot. Most of the older areas were platted with 5000 to 6300 sq ft lots. Downtown is on 250x250 lots, or 62,500 sq ft per block.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2018, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,058 posts, read 1,709,277 times
Reputation: 1594
Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
The lot is 10,750 sq ft. It's something like 150 ft long by 72 ft wide. For Houston, it's a good sized lot. Most of the older areas were platted with 5000 to 6300 sq ft lots. Downtown is on 250x250 lots, or 62,500 sq ft per block.
Even in suburban areas lots over 80 ft frontage are unusual. You basically can only get that in exurbia, except for a few legacy communities closer in. If that's what someone wants, fine, but they'll be pretty hypocritical if they complain that their commute is inconvenient and there's not enough retail and dining nearby.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2018, 12:54 PM
 
909 posts, read 1,037,195 times
Reputation: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanv3 View Post
I turned into Beinhorn instead of Memorial, you got to see those houses!!!

Even if a family made 300k, I am not sure they can afford it unless they worked all their lives. And I don't think one would go for a mortgage if they can afford a 5mn home. There are high chances that some of them are ancestral or owned by business people.
I have a family member who bought a house in West U for $1MM. His total household income is around 200K so I asked him how he afford it. He said the mortgage is 40 years and he sold his old house for $200K

I never knew there is mortgage for 40 years
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2018, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Houston/Brenham
3,575 posts, read 4,205,273 times
Reputation: 6211
Quote:
Originally Posted by misterno View Post
he sold his old house for $200K
This doesn't mean anything out of context. If he owed $300K, then he didn't do so well.

But if it was paid off, then he had a nice down payment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2018, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX (Oak Forest)
4,517 posts, read 11,321,865 times
Reputation: 3607
Quote:
Originally Posted by misterno View Post
I have a family member who bought a house in West U for $1MM. His total household income is around 200K so I asked him how he afford it. He said the mortgage is 40 years and he sold his old house for $200K

I never knew there is mortgage for 40 years
If he put 200k down and took an 800k mortgage his monthly mortgage payment would be $3,300 and his monthly taxes around $2,000 so $5,300 a month. His monthly take home after taxes would be around $13,000 so 40% of income to cover his payment. Higher then recommended but doable and typical in places like NYC and San Francisco.

The advantage of doing this is the potential appreciation. Prices have been rising up to 8% a year in these areas. 8% rise on a 200k house isnt much but on a million thats potentially $80,000 a year in equity you are growing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2018, 09:24 AM
bu2
 
8,979 posts, read 5,675,669 times
Reputation: 3540
Quote:
Originally Posted by katygirl68 View Post
What negative? It was always a nice neighborhood, close to downtown. I lived in West U in the late ‘70s, early ‘80s. That’s when the tear downs started happening, but there was always a nicer side with big homes, and always wealthy people living there. My side was the old ranch 2-3 bedroom houses near Academy Street. But even there the people were doing pretty well. The house we lived in (renting) sold for almost $100,000, which was a lot in those days of high interest, and the new owners tore the house down and built a huge house in its place. The neighborhood is nearly unrecognizable to me now. The elementary school was good, but my mom wanted to move so I didn’t go to Pershing, which was pretty bad back then. Most of my friends went there and they did fine, but it didn’t matter anyway because the owners’ kids wanted to sell the house since the parents were in a nursing home.

I know people that still live there and have resisted selling, so there are still people there with houses they bought for under $100,000.
By negative, I mean the price per square foot was slightly below average in West U. back then. People didn't want the old 1200 sf wooden frame houses from the 30s and 40s with small closets and small bathrooms. The location didn't give enough of a premium at the time to offset the preference for larger houses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2018, 09:26 AM
bu2
 
8,979 posts, read 5,675,669 times
Reputation: 3540
Quote:
Originally Posted by DejaBlue View Post
Please show me that which you speak of? I'm drawing a blank on inner/middle suburbs


If you're talking about Lazybrook, etc. That's nice/ghetto is right down the street. I'll pass. Inside the beltway is too many "nice" areas with trashy areas within proximity. This is my main problem with Westbury. The outer suburbs may have tons of apartments but it's not overun with the low rent, built in the 70s and before <$800 places like inside the Loop.
You are conflating "inside the loop" with "inside the Beltway." There aren't many of those apartments left inside 610.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2018, 09:30 AM
bu2
 
8,979 posts, read 5,675,669 times
Reputation: 3540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
I've heard suburban buyers are less tolerant of crime and grime being near where they are. The fact that the houses in those areas of the central city are still expensive shows the priorities of urban v. suburban buyers.

Remember that 288 divides the Almeda Road area from the bulk of the Third Ward...
West U, Bellaire and much of Memorial are separate cities. River Oaks has a patrol. Those areas probably have lower crime rates than the suburbs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2018, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Greater Houston
4,514 posts, read 8,605,742 times
Reputation: 2086
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
I've heard suburban buyers are less tolerant of crime and grime being near where they are. The fact that the houses in those areas of the central city are still expensive shows the priorities of urban v. suburban buyers.

Remember that 288 divides the Almeda Road area from the bulk of the Third Ward...
A few years ago, I went to a party for my school group one Saturday night and made a detour to UH to pick up a couple of classmates from their dorms (since they didn't have cars) as a favor. I was about to leave an hour early to drop off my group mates due to the massive detour to UH before heading home, but another guest offered to drop them off for me since she lives in South Park. I was able to stay an extra hour because of her.

I told her that I live in Katy and she told me about her food sample server job, and that one time she was dispatched to the Katy Mills H-E-B. She couldn't believe how far the drive was (40 miles--like it was a road trip to San Antonio from the change of scenery from urban, suburban, and to the edge of rural) and doesn't understand how (white--she is Black) people could live that far out.

I was too polite to voice out your sentiment about Suburbanites being less tolerant of crime and grime. I was thinking "If she saw what I have seen living in Katy for the last 10-12 years with the Soccer Moms driving frantically to finish errands...".

Despite gentrification, the Soccer Mom demographic would not live adjacent to a ghetto and being near/in the city is not a priority but space (McMansions on suburban-sized lots), new(-er) housing and availability of mainstream stores nearby (5-10 minute drive to mainstream grocery, pharmacy and other retail chains) are priorities.

I'm still hopeful that the Third Ward would become revitalized with the growth in stature of UH. The first subdivision that could go up is the block with the McDonalds on Elgin. There is a market to target with plenty of students who are priced out of on-campus housing and eventually to some affluent students who prefer upscale surroundings who live in the Galleria to be close to campus.

Sharpstown is another hidden gem that is attractive to young families with the easy freeway access and proximity to the major job centers in the Inner Loop and Sugar Land. Once the demographics change, mainstream stores will come back.

Hopefully growth will spread instead of the same hotspots that everyone competes in over-and-over. Oddly enough, Alief and Shaprstown were not affected by Harvey flooding and the street flooding hotspots on Beechnut and Bellaire have disappeared.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top