U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-29-2018, 01:00 PM
 
257 posts, read 93,353 times
Reputation: 807

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NTexas2010 View Post
no mention as to where OP would be working

That stuck out for me too, and I tried to suggest as much to the OP in my reply to them:



Quote:
Originally Posted by Reefmonkey View Post
I think overall your choice should be on where you'll get the best job in your field.

Who decides to move halfway across the country, narrows it down to two cities they obviously barely know, and apparently without a job prospect in either city? Sounds pretty squirrelly for me. But this is city-data, where the page counts on threads regularly get into the double digits and keep getting added to for years, and not because people sincerely want to help the original posters get the information they need. That ship sailed years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-29-2018, 02:12 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,045,043 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frustratedintelligence View Post
Which isn't a problem if you appreciate a distinct, four season climate and landscape. I like the gray of North Texas winters.
Fair enough.

Quote:
From my observation it has as much to do with the difference in the way the two cities developed. Atlantans won't chop a tree down unless they absolutely have to, but cities like Houston and Dallas will raze an entire group of mature trees and replace this with a handful of stubby oaks. Often times nothing is planted at all...the lack of feeders in Georgia means that all you see from any freeway is forested land; even in the middle of its largest metro.

In other words, neither Houston or Dallas are as green as they could be.
Developer practices certainly do reduce tree coverage, but the disparity in natural tree coverage between Atlanta and the Texas cities still is largely a matter of soil differences.

The entirety of Atlanta has a leached-acidic, well-drained clay soil derived from Appalachian orogeny. The Piney Woods area of Texas, which includes northern Houston, also has this same form of acidic soil, as it is derived from Ozark orogeny, related to the Appalachians. As a result, both areas have thriving forests of magnolia, pines, and other iconic Southern US plants.

In Dallas, as well as the southern parts of Houston, the soil is heavy with a type of clay that experiences drastic changes in volume given moisture levels (shrink vs swell). It is this mechanical claypan stress that makes it harder for tree roots to get established, allowing grasses to have an easier time dominating. Furthermore, the clay type tends to be higher in pH than desired by many of those Southern US plants (less of an issue in Houston than in Dallas): the resulting tree coverage consists of just those typical Southern species that can tolerate the alkaline pH (i.e. oaks, hickories, hackberries, elms), as well as alkaline loving species not seen much in the South (i.e. acacias). These clay soils are derived from marine organic matter underlain by substrate from Rocky Mountain orogeny, which is younger than that from the Appalachians: so the substrate is less weathered, and thus higher in pH.

The link below takes you to a site with various maps that highlight the geological circumstances at play. You'll see the differences in pH, along with soil orders (i.e. ultisols for Atlanta and northern Houston, vertisol for Dallas and southern Houston):
Soil Types

As a result, Houston ends up less naturally tree covered than Atlanta, despite having a warmer and wetter climate. And within Houston, the northern parts have more tree coverage than the wetter, and warmer southern parts. These maps approximate the land coverage, with southern Houston being listed as "coastal prairie" while Atlanta and northern Houston are listed as forest:
https://www.slideshare.net/WorldReso...s-southern-usa
https://texasalmanac.com/sites/defau...Vegetation.jpg

The potential natural vegetation (PNV) of southern Houston, given the climate, would be very much like what is seen in coastal Southeast cities like Jacksonville and Savannah. As for Dallas, the PNV would be still be forest, just shrubbier than other parts of the South due to the drier climate. PNV is achievable, but it just takes a little soil modification.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 02:49 PM
Status: "Impeach "The Bareback Don"" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Katy,TX.
3,467 posts, read 6,818,053 times
Reputation: 3183
Quote:
Originally Posted by LocalPlanner View Post
I don't see anything inherently better about Collin County than Houston suburbs except that Collin County has more legacy historic downtowns.
I don't think you really believe this, you're just another homer that's always trying to defend Houston's garbage development.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 03:02 PM
Status: "waite untill next year. It was fun while it lasted !" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
4,649 posts, read 4,488,393 times
Reputation: 3835
Quote:
Originally Posted by usc619 View Post
I don't think you really believe this, you're just another homer that's always trying to defend Houston's garbage development.

This raises an interesting question, does one need to actually live in the city in which he or she is a booster/homer for ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 03:13 PM
Status: "Impeach "The Bareback Don"" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Katy,TX.
3,467 posts, read 6,818,053 times
Reputation: 3183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Lance View Post
This raises an interesting question, does one need to actually live in the city in which he or she is a booster/homer for ?
Why the need to be a booster/Homer???? Just call it like it is and be honest. My life legacy isn't attached to any city
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
466 posts, read 134,207 times
Reputation: 609
Quote:
Originally Posted by usc619 View Post
Why the need to be a booster/Homer???? Just call it like it is and be honest. My life legacy isn't attached to any city
For the record I agree with you. The suburbs around Dallas simply offer more, but the amenities in Houston are in a shorter radius. Thats why I said if one prefers living in the suburbs Id go with DFW. If someone prefers living in the city, Id go with Houston. Thats a generalization of course and there are some exceptions. I think the Woodlands offers a lot for a suburb and IMO Bishop Arts is better than its Houston equivalent East Downtown. I could see choosing to live in those places.

Katy or Sugar Land just are not in the same league as a place like Plano. A lot of it has to do with size.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 03:27 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,045,043 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by usc619 View Post
I don't think you really believe this, you're just another homer that's always trying to defend Houston's garbage development.
That's a local planner, and so likely knows more about civil engineering and neighborhood design than you do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
466 posts, read 134,207 times
Reputation: 609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texyn View Post
That's a local planner, and so likely knows more about civil engineering and neighborhood design than you do.
I dont have a opinion on the poster in question, but doesnt everyone have their biases? I mean I work in the airline industry but I still have my favorite airlines even though I do work for all of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 03:32 PM
Status: "waite untill next year. It was fun while it lasted !" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Beautiful Northwest Houston
4,649 posts, read 4,488,393 times
Reputation: 3835
Quote:
Originally Posted by usc619 View Post
Why the need to be a booster/Homer???? Just call it like it is and be honest. My life legacy isn't attached to any city

You have the nerve to tell a poster that he or she is not being honest because they do not comport to your view of the metro you live in? Just because one believes one place is as good as another you label that as blind homerism . You need to get attached to something besides your own POV...

Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
For the record I agree with you. The suburbs around Dallas simply offer more, but the amenities in Houston are in a shorter radius. Thats why I said if one prefers living in the suburbs Id go with DFW. If someone prefers living in the city, Id go with Houston. Thats a generalization of course and there are some exceptions. I think the Woodlands offers a lot for a suburb and Bishop Arts its better than its Houston equivalent East Downtown. I could see choosing to live in those places.

Katy or Sugar Land just are not in the same league as a place like Plano. A lot of it has to do with size.

It's six of one half dozen of the other . One , is Plano a suburb or another anchor city. Two is whatever is in Plano extracted from one of the anchor cities. In other words each metro has the capacity to draw X amount of amenities ect. If Plano is so loaded with amenities does that mean another competing city will be left without something it truly needs..?


Also please tell us what all this stuff Plano has is ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2018, 03:44 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,045,043 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
I dont have a opinion on the poster in question, but doesnt everyone have their biases? I mean I work in the airline industry but I still have my favorite airlines even though I do work for all of them.
At least those with the experience can back up their biases effectively, due to greater familiarity with the facts and data.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top