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Old 06-28-2018, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Houston/Los Angeles
121 posts, read 40,703 times
Reputation: 155

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I've spent alota time in west Houston Katy, cypress.. and ibe always joked its like little dallas. The neighborhoods are newer and lack trees. The yards all look alike.

I think that's what give a Houston the edge over Dallas. The neighborhoods here are lined with huge mature trees. It gives it character.

I don't get how no zoning is a bad thing. It makes life easier. You don't really have to go far. I live in spring branch (the branch as we call it) and I have everything within walking distance. I MEAN EVRYTHING LOL. Car shop next yo a Walgreens next to a nail salon next to a barber next to Shipley donuts(mmm) and next to a tire shop.

It's so convienent.
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Old 06-28-2018, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Houston/Los Angeles
121 posts, read 40,703 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
Apart from the scenery. You don't necessarily have to drive for miles to go shopping for anything in Dallas. Lots of areas have high walk scores. My old neighborhood had a walk score in the upper 90s.

Even in the suburbs there are town centers and squares all over that are very walk able. There's also very charming historic downtown areas scattered all around like what's found in Grapevine, McKinney and so on.

And Fort Worth is right there with all it has to offer.
I like uptown Dallas. I just don't care for the burbs. I'm in spring branch but thinking of making the move inside the loop. IMO Dallas would be even better without zoning. Prob not to the extent of Houston but some kind of "No zoning lite" lol
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Old 06-28-2018, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,887 posts, read 4,124,161 times
Reputation: 1870
Quote:
Originally Posted by dallasboi View Post
I was wondering which neighborhood also. Yes Dallas does have better developed and enjoyable suburbs..but central Dallas is probably one of the most urban areas in Texas. So I don't think Dallas is lacking in the "BIG CITY" department...Dallas gives the best of both worlds.
Uptown Dallas > Midtown Houston
Oak Lawn > Montrose
Lower Greenville > Washington Ave
North Oak Cliff/Bishop Arts > The Heights

Nothing in Houston like Deep Ellum, Knox District, Dallas Design District, The Farmer's Market District

I will say that the Museum District along with Hermann Park in Houston is a very nice area and I enjoy the park system along the Buffalo Bayou.

I guess the Turtle Creek/Katy Trail corridor and White Rock Lake area would be our closest comparison to those areas in Dallas.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,887 posts, read 4,124,161 times
Reputation: 1870
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinpa7 View Post
I like uptown Dallas. I just don't care for the burbs. I'm in spring branch but thinking of making the move inside the loop. IMO Dallas would be even better without zoning. Prob not to the extent of Houston but some kind of "No zoning lite" lol
We are pretty much zoning lite when compared to Boston, D.C., etc. The problem in Dallas is that we have height restrictions in many areas that are becoming more dense. Even up in Addison/North Dallas there's height restrictions because of the jetport there.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Houston/Los Angeles
121 posts, read 40,703 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
We are pretty much zoning lite when compared to Boston, D.C., etc. The problem in Dallas is that we have height restrictions in many areas that are becoming more dense. Even up in Addison/North Dallas there's height restrictions because of the jetport there.
I read somewhere that the mayorial system in Dallas is diff then Houston or other cities. Hasn't the mayor been mayor for like a decade?

I read that you guys don't elect a mayor?

That's B.S. the people of Dallas need to get back the power over the city. I read that the mayor caters to big companies and their pockets rather then what's best for the future of Dallas.

I could be wrong tho. But still. Cities need fresh ideas. Fresh direction.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
2,887 posts, read 4,124,161 times
Reputation: 1870
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinpa7 View Post
I read somewhere that the mayorial system in Dallas is diff then Houston or other cities. Hasn't the mayor been mayor for like a decade?

I read that you guys don't elect a mayor?

That's B.S. the people of Dallas need to get back the power over the city. I read that the mayor caters to big companies and their pockets rather then what's best for the future of Dallas.

I could be wrong tho. But still. Cities need fresh ideas. Fresh direction.
lol we elect a mayor and council like most cities. The mayor can serve two 4 year terms.

Our current mayor is a very progressive, forward thinking person with a great sense of business and community. I'll miss him when he leaves.

And fresh ideas is certainly something we don't lack in Dallas. We are ever evolving and building for the future.

I think there's some misconceptions or misinformation and outdated ideas about what life is like here.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Houston/Los Angeles
121 posts, read 40,703 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by R1070 View Post
lol we elect a mayor and council like most cities. The mayor can serve two 4 year terms.

Our current mayor is a very progressive, forward thinking person with a great sense of business and community. I'll miss him when he leaves.

And fresh ideas is certainly something we don't lack in Dallas. We are ever evolving and building for the future.
Hmm, I was wrong. I'll try to find the article. But I believe you.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:27 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,046,172 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frustratedintelligence View Post
*Houston gets tornadoes as well as hurricanes. If you're truly concerned about dangerous weather, Dallas is the safer option.
Hurricane remnants do more damage to Dallas than tornadoes do to Houston.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liljo22 View Post
Houston gets about as many tornadoes as Miami gets which is very little except in a hurricane.
Precisely.
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Old 06-28-2018, 10:32 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,046,172 times
Reputation: 1386
Also, wouldn't this thread be better in the Texas forum?
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Old 06-28-2018, 11:02 PM
 
Location: South Padre Island, TX
2,459 posts, read 1,046,172 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinpa7 View Post
I've spent alota time in west Houston Katy, cypress.. and ibe always joked its like little dallas. The neighborhoods are newer and lack trees. The yards all look alike.

I think that's what give a Houston the edge over Dallas. The neighborhoods here are lined with huge mature trees. It gives it character.

I don't get how no zoning is a bad thing. It makes life easier. You don't really have to go far. I live in spring branch (the branch as we call it) and I have everything within walking distance. I MEAN EVRYTHING LOL. Car shop next yo a Walgreens next to a nail salon next to a barber next to Shipley donuts(mmm) and next to a tire shop.

It's so convienent.
You know all those 19th century historic areas in NYC, Philly, New Orleans Savannah, etc that people find oh so charming? They were built long before the first zoning ordinance was ever drafted:
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...ilt-today.html

The lack of zoning simply places control of development in the hands of the market. And one can only imagine the walkable boom that would enveil if that market were filled with urbanists. But unfortunately, with many of the regulations placed in the city's code, this urban potential is never realized: decent townhome development is forced to provide parking spaces, and venues are forced to be a certain distance back from the sidewalk:
https://marketurbanism.com/2016/09/1...ates-land-use/

I like the lack of zoning. But let's throw out the regulations.
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