U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-01-2019, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,953 posts, read 2,487,787 times
Reputation: 1353

Advertisements

It’s funny - we move into their neighborhoods and they run.

The then want to come back into our neighborhoods they either abandoned or never lived in and they get mad and want to upset the balance when it doesn’t fit their needs
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-01-2019, 06:49 PM
 
45 posts, read 13,319 times
Reputation: 62
On another note looks like some activist are trying to revitalize Frenchtown, 5th ward.

https://frenchtownhouston.org/


I consider myself as part of the "frenchtown diaspora" seeing as that's the original place my maternal grandparents settled when they left st landry louisiana and moved to houston and plan on investing and setting up shop there one day. I just hope these revitalization efforts properly represent the *AFRICAN AMERICAN* culture and community there and don't try to exoticize it to something it's not and never was. I'm already seeing some iffy stuff in the origin/history section, but everything else seems cool. The fact is that the vast majority of us current gen black Houstonians of lou creole ancestry are of a mix of TXn non-creole and Lou creole ancestry and so is our culture which is pretty much just Houston's black culture at this point. There's no distinctly "creole" culture or community in Houston separate from the rest of the African-American community in Houston.



Also, I like how they slapped a pic of Lightnin Hopkins on there who was a rural East TXn, not of creole stock. lol He was married to a Lou creole black woman after he moved to Houston though.


The bro Christopher Senegal is also doing work trying to revitalize 5th ward for the residents.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2019, 06:53 PM
 
4,789 posts, read 8,842,120 times
Reputation: 1891
I don't think there's a "they" here, as the gentrifiers are not the same type of people as the "bless my heart" Southern whites who left South Park et al when it started receiving black people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hbcu View Post
It’s funny - we move into their neighborhoods and they run.

The then want to come back into our neighborhoods they either abandoned or never lived in and they get mad and want to upset the balance when it doesn’t fit their needs
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2019, 06:59 PM
 
3,183 posts, read 1,453,934 times
Reputation: 5999
Quote:
Originally Posted by JYHTOWN View Post
My people never choose "America", "Texas", or "Houston". Unlike you and other people of immigrant background we were forced to come to these lands, this country, this state, and even this city in chains, and build it from the ground up when no one wanted to move here.

We never got the chance to choose on whether we wanted capitalism, socialism, or communism. We had to fight tooth and nail for the basic human rights we do have.

But, human ethics says WE DO have the right to self determination just like the native americans. And we will start by opposing your plans of mass displacement and homelessness through gentrification.

I guess you must've missed the part about white people in Humble literally FORCING every black person to leave the town after the sawmill was closed down in the 20s, which led to the refugees creating the bordersville community.

That's rich coming from a group of people who through mass hissy fits and called for the defunding of an entire city when the statue of a savage confederate war criminal was removed. A statue that isn't anywhere NEAR as old as those bricks mind you. Sorry, but there's no bigger cry babies and entitled sore losers as white americans.
I'm going to be blunt. You sound like an entitled, angry young man. You aren't old enough to have been forced to come here, you were born here. You can't stop gentrification, which doesn't actually cause homelessness, that's more of an addiction/mental health issue.

You have the right to self determination within the bounds of overall society, but you have no right to tell anyone else that they can't live in "your part of town". If you keep up with this attitude, you will marginalize yourself, and be ignored by most people, regardless of race.

The idiots who cried about removal of Confederate statues are just that, idiots. Pay them no mind.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2019, 07:03 PM
 
4,789 posts, read 8,842,120 times
Reputation: 1891
It would have been very interesting to explore Frenchtown when people were mostly French speaking. It is true that Creole folk exported their food to Houston (Frenchy's) and assimilated into the wider Afram community.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JYHTOWN View Post
On another note looks like some activist are trying to revitalize Frenchtown, 5th ward.

https://frenchtownhouston.org/


I consider myself as part of the "frenchtown diaspora" seeing as that's the original place my maternal grandparents settled when they left st landry louisiana and moved to houston and plan on investing and setting up shop there one day. I just hope these revitalization efforts properly represent the *AFRICAN AMERICAN* culture and community there and don't try to exoticize it to something it's not and never was. I'm already seeing some iffy stuff in the origin/history section, but everything else seems cool. The fact is that the vast majority of us current gen black Houstonians of lou creole ancestry are of a mix of TXn non-creole and Lou creole ancestry and so is our culture which is pretty much just Houston's black culture at this point. There's no distinctly "creole" culture or community in Houston separate from the rest of the African-American community in Houston.



Also, I like how they slapped a pic of Lightnin Hopkins on there who was a rural East TXn, not of creole stock. lol He was married to a Lou creole black woman after he moved to Houston though.


The bro Christopher Senegal is also doing work trying to revitalize 5th ward for the residents.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2019, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,953 posts, read 2,487,787 times
Reputation: 1353
there were a number of creoles in third ward as alot from my family's neck of the woods lived off Dowling also but they were more scattered as there are 3 catholic churches in the area (St Nicholas, St. Peter's and St. Mary's) that could really tell the story of the area. More St. Nicholas as that's where alot of them came from. Alot of Frenchtown folks moved east towards Pleasantville, Fidelity and Galena Park before heading out towards North Shore.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2019, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
902 posts, read 664,961 times
Reputation: 1726
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbcu View Post
It’s funny - we move into their neighborhoods and they run.

The then want to come back into our neighborhoods they either abandoned or never lived in and they get mad and want to upset the balance when it doesn’t fit their needs
Did you ever stop for a minute to ask yourself why that is? Or why it isn’t just “they” who feel this way?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
I don't think there's a "they" here, as the gentrifiers are not the same type of people as the "bless my heart" Southern whites who left South Park et al when it started receiving black people.
Exactly. Those people either (not) bred themselves out of existence or their descendants are currently fleeing the outer suburbs for the woods. But if they’re not needed who really cares where they go?

Otherwise this thread is proof why the aforementioned historic parts of town will always be seen as increasingly poor and marginalized.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2019, 11:20 AM
 
45 posts, read 13,319 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicman View Post
It would have been very interesting to explore Frenchtown when people were mostly French speaking. It is true that Creole folk exported their food to Houston (Frenchy's) and assimilated into the wider Afram community.

Well some that came over like my maternal grandfather(papa), were bilingual from the start. Now, his parents, my great grandparents, were primarily creole speakers with very limited english skills. They never left St Landry parish.



So if southern Louisiana creoles were already being anglocized in their homeland even in the most rural outskirts, then you can image how quick it happened in a urban big TX anglophone city like Houston, were you don't even have any push back from the dominant white society like you do with the cajuns in southern lou.



And yes, their biggest impacts was in the realm of food and music, hands down. Crawfish, gumbo, red beans and rice, boudain, SETX Creole-Cowboy BBQ hybrid, and of course Zydeco, which has shown itself to have greater staying power in ears of the black community than blues or R&B(talking the original "ike turner" type rnb here).



The Frenchy's restaurant IMO was an attempt at mimicking the food cooked by the mostly rural southern lou stock creoles in Houston, and adding his own urban New Orlean's creole flavor into the mix.



And well, since there no disctinct creole community in Houston today, and speaking as a phyiscal manifestation of that assimilation of lou creoles and TXn non-creoles, I'd say yeah, they've pretty much assimilated into the greater AA community here in houston. But, so has black non-creole society done into lou creole community houston. Creole aspects of Houston's black culture are ubiquitous throughout the black community in the city. Hence why 97.9, 102.1, and 92.1 all play Zydeco music and Frenchy's is one of our most beloved black restaurant franchises. I think some people forget that black lou-born people in the city outnumbered black people born in any other state included TX(if you don't count native houston born ppl) at many times in history. Most old black churches in the city have a "Texas-Louisiana" day.



Black and the few mulatto creoles in Houston had enough other things to worry about in a Jim Crow like this than language preservation. Plus, African-American creoles and non-creoles still fall under the same greater ethnic category and share pretty much all core aspects of Afram culture and history. They are a unique community with a unique heritage, but not so unique that it takes them out of the fold of being African-American.

Last edited by JYHTOWN; 12-02-2019 at 11:32 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2019, 11:25 AM
 
45 posts, read 13,319 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbcu View Post
there were a number of creoles in third ward as alot from my family's neck of the woods lived off Dowling also but they were more scattered as there are 3 catholic churches in the area (St Nicholas, St. Peter's and St. Mary's) that could really tell the story of the area. More St. Nicholas as that's where alot of them came from. Alot of Frenchtown folks moved east towards Pleasantville, Fidelity and Galena Park before heading out towards North Shore.

Yeah, Frenchtown certainly wasn't the only place lou creole migrated to when they came here. They settled all over SETX really. 3rd ward was a popular destination because it has the oldest black catholic church. So, was 4th ward, because it was just the most popular black neighborhood in the city at one time.



Barrett Station TX in East Harris county was founded, built, and settled by black Louisianians before Frenchtown, and was popular destination for them after the great MS flood. The baytown area was another popular destination. Lotta the ones from Frenchtown ended up moving to Kashmere & Trinity Garden, as well as the Homestead area like my grandparents.



But they can be found all over the city really. Look at Beyonce's folk from way out in Alief.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-02-2019, 08:57 PM
 
4,789 posts, read 8,842,120 times
Reputation: 1891
Unless theres an economic collapse, the wealthier folk are moving in as per Houston super neighborhood demographic tables.

Quote:
Originally Posted by detachable arm View Post

Otherwise this thread is proof why the aforementioned historic parts of town will always be seen as increasingly poor and marginalized.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:43 AM.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top