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Old 07-12-2008, 09:36 AM
 
429 posts, read 1,069,740 times
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Default what is an exurb?

I'm not sure if it is exurb or exburb? I thought it had something to do with suburbs, like a type of suburb? I googled it and it said it is a rural area that doesn't have any commercial areas? We don't really use that term in Chicago (at least I've never heard of it?), maybe because you're either in the suburbs over loaded with commercial areas, or you're on a farm 2.5 hours out of the city. What are examples of exurbs in Houston?
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Old 07-12-2008, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Houston (Memorial) and Western NC
8,801 posts, read 14,376,492 times
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Well, I think all the far out burbs (exurbs) have strip retail and town center dealies now. They're morphing, but bascially at this point they're still mostly commuter residental. Currently I think everyone has their own idea of what an exurb is. To me it just a Master Planned Community or plotted neighborhood, plopped down way the heck out from downtown.

So my full would definition of an exurb Is: An area over 45-50 minutes door to door (miles don't count in this town) from the core at rush hour without a wreck or construction, that doesn't sustain the employment of the majority of it's residents.

So I would say look at a map, look a few miles outside the Beltway at all the Master-Planned Communities and there you will find the exurbs.
Ie. The Woodlands/Tomball/Magnolia, Cypress areas,Kingwood,Bridgeland, Katy. Sugarland I'm on the fence about. Katy seems to have a lot of employment right in the EC, so really it's a gray area as well. The Master Communities that have miles of wasteland,or hood, between them and the rest of the city are the one that stand out to me the most.

To me Pearland is an exurb, but if you go by drive time it's not. However the congestion down there....

To me a suburb of Houston is single family home neighborhoods within city limits, inside or right at the Beltway.
Ie. Briargrove, Memorial Villages, West U., Tanglewood, Bellaire, Garden Oaks,Wilchester, Meyerland,Briargrove Park,etc.

Last edited by EasilyAmused; 07-12-2008 at 10:26 AM.. Reason: to add my definition of a suburb
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Old 07-12-2008, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Houston
1,433 posts, read 3,272,975 times
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What EasilyAmused said.
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Old 07-12-2008, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Austin Bound
4,642 posts, read 8,150,933 times
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chicagomama, whether some of these posters talk about exurbs or suburbs, what they really mean is these are geographic areas that don't meet with their approval. In their utopian ideal of urban development, everyone would live close to downtown. They cannot accept that some people have different priorities or budgets than they do so they take every opportunity they can to reiterate the same tired points about how awful it is that anyone would commute or live anywhere but the most desirable downtown locations. Every new visitor to the site is a fresh opportunity to bash Katy, The Woodlands, Sugar Land, etc. After awhile, you know which posters have the most extreme biases so you can filter what they say through those lens.
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Old 07-12-2008, 11:57 AM
 
Location: 77059
7,663 posts, read 17,107,723 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EasilyAmused View Post
So I would say look at a map, look a few miles outside the Beltway at all the Master-Planned Communities and there you will find the exurbs.
Ie. The Woodlands/Tomball/Magnolia, Cypress areas,Kingwood,Bridgeland, Katy. ...

Kingwood is still inside the Houston city limits even though it's way out there, ~25-28 miles from downtown.

Commuter town - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This defines them as rural communities beyond the suburbs.

So break out the maps. IMO, this would be The Woodlands to the N, Kingwood to the NE, Mont Belvieu/Cove to the E, League City (south of FM 518) to the SE, Alvin to the S, Richmond/Rosenberg to the SW, Katy to the W and Cypress/Tomball to the NW. The plan for the 99 Grand Parkway (3rd loop) will generally connect all the exurbs one of these days.

Also, as that article mentions the higher wealth and education levels of the exurban demographic, some people (mainly inner-city, bleeding-heart, slaves to landlords) use 'exurb' as a derogatory term.
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Old 07-12-2008, 11:57 AM
 
429 posts, read 1,069,740 times
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"An area over 45-50 minutes door to door (miles don't count in this town) from the core at rush hour without a wreck or construction, that doesn't sustain the employment of the majority of it's residents."

That's a great definition. I guess it is like a commuter town. It's interesting because your "suburbs" are within city limits, whereas we would just consider those "city," as they'd be neighborhoods within the city, and then anything outside the city limits would be a "suburb." So someone who lived in a place in Chicago like Lincoln Park or Wicker Park would not be pleased if you referred to them as a suburb ha ha. But then our suburbs, that might be referred to as exurbs because they are 30 miles out (ie an hour or more in commute) are completely self-sustaining (like Oak Brook, HQ of McDonald's among others).

Interesting how each city calls their areas different things. I like the term exurb. So if we live in Sugar Land and my hubby works in Stafford, I can still call it an exurb, even though he isn't commuting to the city, because technically he won't be working IN Sugar Land...
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Old 07-12-2008, 12:06 PM
 
429 posts, read 1,069,740 times
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OK- so I just read the 2 recent posts (right before mine). Well I don't like the term if it used derrogatory! That's so funny. Who cares if people want to live closer to or farther from the city? I don't get it? We originally wanted to live in Memorial (too expensive and too far) or Meyerland (also too expensive- only 2 houses for sale in our price range). But we are choosing SUgar Land because it is 3 miles from hubby's work. I am SOOOOO happy to get rid of his 2 hour commute, you have no idea. SO I guess I won't use the term if it is meant to demean or criticize!!! I will keep my eye out and take it with a grain of salt.
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Old 07-12-2008, 12:09 PM
 
Location: 77059
7,663 posts, read 17,107,723 times
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It's not a derogatory term per se, but some people use it as such.
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Old 07-12-2008, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Houston (Memorial) and Western NC
8,801 posts, read 14,376,492 times
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It's not derogatory to those that live in Houston. There is a geographic difference between suburb and exburbs to those that live in Houston,and the word is used as mere description.

If you say you live in a suburb of Houston, most people that have lived here for a portion of time will think of HOUSTON neighborhoods within and around the Beltway. Sugarland, The Woodlands, Katy and Pearland are not IN Houtson. They are in entirely DIFFERENT TOWNS. Kingwood is still and exburb due to geopgraphics, and it was only recently annexed.

When I lived in The Woodlands I lived in an EXBURB/EXURB. When I live in Briargrove I live in a SUBURB.

Some people are just so sensitive. :P

Ok, here is a derogatory definition if you are DYING for one. EXBURB
http://209.85.141.104/search?q=cache...lnk&cd=1&gl=us
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Old 07-12-2008, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Houston
415 posts, read 71,823 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagomama View Post
I'm not sure if it is exurb or exburb? I thought it had something to do with suburbs, like a type of suburb? I googled it and it said it is a rural area that doesn't have any commercial areas? We don't really use that term in Chicago (at least I've never heard of it?), maybe because you're either in the suburbs over loaded with commercial areas, or you're on a farm 2.5 hours out of the city. What are examples of exurbs in Houston?
Both cities have exurbs. Exurbs are used all over the nation actually and not unique to Houston. An example of a Chicago exurb would be DeKalb.

For Houston, one would be Brookshire, Sealy, Willis, Splendora, etc. Examples of suburbs of Houston would be Katy, The Woodlands, Sugar Land, Pearland, League City, etc.
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