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Old 07-23-2008, 05:11 PM
 
112 posts, read 353,271 times
Reputation: 63

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I moved here not long ago and was surprised to see that everywhere i went, trees were planted with mounds of dirt and mulch up around the trunk and root perimeter of the tree.

I can not understand why this is a common practice here when it is contrary to healthy procedure for planting and maintaining healthy growth.

No plant should have mulch or dirt above the surface of the ground, especially around it's trunk or main stem. The increases the chance for rot, fungus, and the promotion of bugs.

Yet....in HOUSTON, this is common in every new development or business landscape and the practice is continued long afterward by home and business owners .

Anybody got a clue how the practice was started and why it is perpetuated.

BY THE WAY, I HAVE NEVER SEEN THIS DONE TO SUCH AN EXTREME ANYWHERE ELSE.
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Old 07-23-2008, 06:24 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
283 posts, read 1,154,996 times
Reputation: 153
Quote:
Anybody got a clue how the practice was started and why it is perpetuated.
Ignorance. I think some of these trees on public property are planted by city personnel, others are planted by volunteer groups. Too many of those doing the planting don't know how (to do the job right) and nobody knowledgeable is supervising them. Why not try and contact somebody with the city and give them some specific locations, tell them what you saw and explain the problem? Sometimes you get results. I was watching a city crew (subcontractors, I believe) redo some broken up sidewalks near downtown and rather than suspending the rebar (before pouring the concrete mix) as it should be they were placing the rebar FLAT on the excavated surface. I called the appropriate city department, they responded by sending an inspector over and later contacted me to let me know they had made this crew redo the job and do it right. So much of this city work is done by subcontractors and so many of those are not very good at what they're supposed to do.

These guys may be able to get results for you:
City of Houston eGovernment Center
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Old 07-23-2008, 06:43 PM
 
112 posts, read 353,271 times
Reputation: 63
Default Rampant

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastender67 View Post
Ignorance. I think some of these trees on public property are planted by city personnel, others are planted by volunteer groups. Too many of those doing the planting don't know how (to do the job right) and nobody knowledgeable is supervising them. Why not try and contact somebody with the city and give them some specific locations, tell them what you saw and explain the problem? Sometimes you get results. I was watching a city crew (subcontractors, I believe) redo some broken up sidewalks near downtown and rather than suspending the rebar (before pouring the concrete mix) as it should be they were placing the rebar FLAT on the excavated surface. I called the appropriate city department, they responded by sending an inspector over and later contacted me to let me know they had made this crew redo the job and do it right. So much of this city work is done by subcontractors and so many of those are not very good at what they're supposed to do.

These guys may be able to get results for you:
City of Houston eGovernment Center
Thanks. I will try that but most of what I see is in developments and is literally everywhere. The two oaks in my front yard that come as standard builder landscaping with the house and everyone else's, are done like that and every tree coming into the subdivision.

We have been leasing so we are also looking at homes to buy and find that in Victory Lakes, Tuscan Lakes, South shore Harbor..all over.

It proves that even if you perpetrate something totally false with consistency, it can be made to appear right.

We all ought to know this by now when we consider the wool glasses we wear from the actions of our government.
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Old 07-23-2008, 11:20 PM
 
Location: where nothin ever grows. no rain or rivers flow, TX
2,028 posts, read 7,334,594 times
Reputation: 442
cedar (mulch), insects hate them. I personally have not seen cedar (like dogear fencing or my black mulch) with mold. probably because its hot and dry out there. I would think insects would rather live in a grass patch where they got sustenance and right conditions for fungus
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Old 07-24-2008, 02:45 AM
 
28 posts, read 76,563 times
Reputation: 14
simply cosmetic
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Old 07-24-2008, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Houston
407 posts, read 1,549,919 times
Reputation: 294
I'm not 100% positive but I always assumed they were planting the root ball 6-12 inches above ground and then overlaying with soil. This is how it's recommended to plant azaleas for example. Our soil is very poor draining clay and when we get a lot of rain (it happens) the root balls can sit in water But if they are planted above ground they can drain. The additional height also allows for the soil to settle.

Last edited by citizen_jane; 07-24-2008 at 06:15 AM..
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Old 07-24-2008, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Charleston Sc and Western NC
9,274 posts, read 22,772,739 times
Reputation: 4684
1. Our soil isn't great. Mostly clay, so this allows the root ball a little breathing room.
2. Most yard crews haven't a clue what they are doing (Mow and Blow) and don't speak a lick of english, so this keeps them from weed whacking the saplings into shavings.
3. Most builders have to replant any dead landscaping if it dies within a certain time period. This allows them to escape possibilities of 1 &2.
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Old 07-24-2008, 08:39 AM
 
Location: where nothin ever grows. no rain or rivers flow, TX
2,028 posts, read 7,334,594 times
Reputation: 442
business area landscapes in most cases i've seen look perfectly healthy to me. at least in MY area. so I do not understand why some people think the professional landscapers are doing something ignorant. people cant even take care of their own lawns out there while biz areas actually have grass in the shaded areas of their healthy trees so I think they are doing something right. probably a trade secret not many know
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Old 07-24-2008, 08:44 AM
 
43 posts, read 157,638 times
Reputation: 46
yeah, it's bad form, but at least they are planting trees
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Old 07-24-2008, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh N. Hills / Houston-Clear Lake
8,156 posts, read 26,425,344 times
Reputation: 4395
Fact is a lot of disrespectful, know-nothing know-it-alls think professional laborers of all types do ignorant things.

There's nothing wrong with using mulch around the trees. I use pine bark mulch and have half a dozen healthy trees, with one 50 foot longleaf pine. No bugs or mold to speak of in there. The mulch breathes better than our soil, and eventually decomposes to dirt so it has to be redone 2-3x per year. Some neighbors put colorful annuals around their trees in the mulch and they grow & flower just fine during their season. Again, I see no problem with this.
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