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Old 01-13-2009, 04:01 PM
 
Location: The Brazos River runs thru it.
1,770 posts, read 3,564,617 times
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Blah Blah Blah!!!

Oh I thought you were typing something that made sense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
The only thing "urban" about the southside is the slum/ghetto/dilapidation factor. Otherwise the houses are set up suburban style, in rows with back yards with the usual sprawl.

Westchase isn't urban either. I know the area is trying to pimp it as such, but IMO no communities that hug the beltway are "urban."
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Old 01-13-2009, 04:20 PM
 
Location: #
9,605 posts, read 14,273,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EEstudent View Post
OK SugrarLand is a suburb; nothing compared to Chicago, obviously you dont live out here, there is nothing for 18-30 year old crowd. The town square they built has some good restaurants; and thats about it, there are usually children playing around during the day and snobby high school kids at night.

Is lincoln park like that? hmm maybe I should ask some of the people in the Chicago forum for their opinion;
I'm from Chicago. I used to live 1/2 mile from Lincoln Park. It's like a mini Lincoln Park. But as I said, Houston is not urban in general.
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Old 01-13-2009, 05:20 PM
 
756 posts, read 1,662,027 times
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Southern cities in general are not going to be built as compact as northern cities. This is with good reason. You can actually die if you have to walk long distances in some of the winter temperatures. Can't really die from walking in the heat unless you refuse to drink water.

Houston's a great city. It has great amenities, nice suburbs, and an urban core with lots of culture and nightlife. Houston is not like Chicago, thank god.
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Old 01-14-2009, 03:24 PM
 
Location: houston/sugarland
734 posts, read 863,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coog78 View Post
Southern cities in general are not going to be built as compact as northern cities. This is with good reason. You can actually die if you have to walk long distances in some of the winter temperatures. Can't really die from walking in the heat unless you refuse to drink water.

Houston's a great city. It has great amenities, nice suburbs, and an urban core with lots of culture and nightlife. Houston is not like Chicago, thank god.

Ummm you cant really die from walking out side in the cold unless you really refuse to wear a coat; but cold is curable by going inside just as heat is fixable by also going inside; i dont see your point.

Houston is an 'ok' city; it has got some great food and some great friendly people, but it also has its down sides such as; Sprawl, strip malls, ugliness, construction, refineries, hurricanes, humidity, abysmal public transportation etc. etc.

Houston is not overall great, it has some great neighborhoods (Uptown, Rice Village, Montrose, TMC etc.) but overall it has soo much to improve on
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Old 01-14-2009, 03:41 PM
 
756 posts, read 1,662,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EEstudent View Post
Ummm you cant really die from walking out side in the cold unless you really refuse to wear a coat; but cold is curable by going inside just as heat is fixable by also going inside; i dont see your point.

Houston is an 'ok' city; it has got some great food and some great friendly people, but it also has its down sides such as; Sprawl, strip malls, ugliness, construction, refineries, hurricanes, humidity, abysmal public transportation etc. etc.

Houston is not overall great, it has some great neighborhoods (Uptown, Rice Village, Montrose, TMC etc.) but overall it has soo much to improve on
Sorry, it is a great city. I agree with you that the sprawl and strip malls are horrible and thus I choose not to live in the suburbs. We agree that on average the population is friendly and there is some really good food. I completely disagree about the ugliness comment. Memorial and Eleanoar Tinsley Parks are both very nice as well as Hermann Park.

My biggest frown on the city is the lack of public transportation other than bus. If the Metro routes were better published and more organized like San Francisco, it would not be a problem. We have a moronic politician named Tom DeLay from the stinkhole of Sugarland to thank for ridiculous opposal to mass transit.

Construction is in every city, it's inescapable. The fact that I live in Montrose does give me a favorably skewed view of the city, I admit.

Houston does offer the most bang for your buck out of any American city.
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh N. Hills / Houston-Clear Lake
8,156 posts, read 26,420,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coog78 View Post
Sorry, it is a great city. I agree with you that the sprawl and strip malls are horrible and thus I choose not to live in the suburbs.

As if the chic & uber-trendy places in the inner city here don't have sprawl and strip malls. I'll give any computer-literate Joe 2 minutes with the Google Maps "street view" and bet $20 he'll find at least one in there.
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Old 01-15-2009, 07:22 AM
 
Location: houston/sugarland
734 posts, read 863,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
As if the chic & uber-trendy places in the inner city here don't have sprawl and strip malls. I'll give any computer-literate Joe 2 minutes with the Google Maps "street view" and bet $20 he'll find at least one in there.
He'll at-least find 5
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Old 01-15-2009, 12:35 PM
 
756 posts, read 1,662,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
As if the chic & uber-trendy places in the inner city here don't have sprawl and strip malls. I'll give any computer-literate Joe 2 minutes with the Google Maps "street view" and bet $20 he'll find at least one in there.
How can an inner city sprawl inside itself? By sheer definition, you can find strip malls in the heart of San Francisco or Boston. I think what makes them different inside the loop and any inner city is that you don't tend to have a Payless next to a Subway next to an Old Navy, Kohl's, and across the street from a Wal-Mart.

So no, you can't find that in the inner city. And I'm not sure that I would call Montrose and Rice Village uber-trendy considering they have not changed dramatically the past 20 years?????
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Old 01-16-2009, 07:19 AM
 
Location: houston/sugarland
734 posts, read 863,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coog78 View Post
How can an inner city sprawl inside itself? By sheer definition, you can find strip malls in the heart of San Francisco or Boston. I think what makes them different inside the loop and any inner city is that you don't tend to have a Payless next to a Subway next to an Old Navy, Kohl's, and across the street from a Wal-Mart.

Correct you can find sprawl inside any major city; but its way more prevalent in this city; where in the world do you find buildings that look like they belong in a Suburb within a stone's throw of downtown!? Most other cities have strip malls within surrounding communities, not in the middle of the action.
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Old 01-16-2009, 07:36 AM
 
756 posts, read 1,662,027 times
Reputation: 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by EEstudent View Post
Correct you can find sprawl inside any major city; but its way more prevalent in this city; where in the world do you find buildings that look like they belong in a Suburb within a stone's throw of downtown!? Most other cities have strip malls within surrounding communities, not in the middle of the action.
You find this is any newer city. Not some newer cities, but ALL of them. If you want the older city effect, you have the Northeast and Europe. Does it really matter so much what a building looks like as compared to what is in the building?
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