U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 12-05-2009, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 1,461,815 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
Sounds like you've never been to any, (excuse me let me use the term) "real cities." A lot of cities don't have nearly the amount of trees that Houston does--in general because they lack the open space.

Not to say Manhattan (for example) doesn't have any trees, but relative to office space, outside of Central Park (which is gorgeous by the way) the natural trees are lacking. (You'd probably have to move to one of the outer boroughs for that.) The built environment really covers up that flaw. The real key is incorporating natural elements with synthetic ones, which NYC and quite a few cities do well.

IMO, Houston would have stood better to make the bayous more attractive, rather than making them concrete eyesores. It would be nice if Houston was as forested as those areas, but that suburban look is one Houston is trying to shy away from and currently Houston blurs the two, however, not very well. It also probably would have also helped if the refineries were far inland.
Well it depends on where you are in NYC. Of course Staten Island is full of trees, but I've also seen pictures taken in The Bronx and Queens where there are somany trees that you could easily forget you were in the urban mecca of the universe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-05-2009, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,250 posts, read 2,912,630 times
Reputation: 1508
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
Well it depends on where you are in NYC. Of course Staten Island is full of trees, but I've also seen pictures taken in The Bronx and Queens where there are somany trees that you could easily forget you were in the urban mecca of the universe.
Well, yeaah...that's why I said Manhattan...
Same happens in Houston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 02:37 PM
Status: "Its Football time!!!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Houston, TX
15,388 posts, read 14,874,220 times
Reputation: 13661
Ummm...usually they build refineries close to where the oil is, and where they can easily transport it to end users. In LA they are in the southern part near Carson and Long Beach...near the port. Other industries chose to build close to the refineries because thats where they get their raw materials from. Producing things that are used to make plastics, rubber etc.

Towns in the piney woods have sawmills and pulp plants to process the wood...all about access to the raw materials and transport.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 1,461,815 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
Well, yeaah...that's why I said Manhattan...
Same happens in Houston.
Okay, well I'm missing your point...I mean, I never said Houston didn't already have tons and tons of trees. I was just saying it would be neat if it was as densely forested as places like Kingwood.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 19,092,436 times
Reputation: 6647
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
Okay, well I'm missing your point...I mean, I never said Houston didn't already have tons and tons of trees. I was just saying it would be neat if it was as densely forested as places like Kingwood.
Than we'd look more like Atlanta...yuck!

Nah, I'm just kidding lol

You have to remember that this is Texas and all they would've did is tore down all those trees to implement more concrete. You could say the same for Dallas though; if it had been built more to the East; they'd have better tree coverage.

Austin has the best location in Texas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 1,461,815 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
Than we'd look more like Atlanta...yuck!

Nah, I'm just kidding lol

You have to remember that this is Texas and all they would've did is tore down all those trees to implement more concrete.
I like to pretend that wouldn't be the case lol. And parts of Houston already look like the A. Especially up around Bush Airport.

Quote:
You could say the same for Dallas though; if it had been built more to the East; they'd have better tree coverage.
Yep.

Quote:
Austin has the best location in Texas.
Do you mean of the big cities or the best location period? Because if we're talking about the all around best location, I would say it's the Jacksonville/Rusk/Gilmer/South Tyler areas. Nice hills and tall forests.

Last edited by MrMcCoySays; 12-05-2009 at 05:46 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,250 posts, read 2,912,630 times
Reputation: 1508
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
Okay, well I'm missing your point...I mean, I never said Houston didn't already have tons and tons of trees. I was just saying it would be neat if it was as densely forested as places like Kingwood.
I know and I understand. I'm just saying, there are areas just like that. (Kingwood is technically part of Houston anyway.) However, my point is that it's very difficult to paint any large city with such a wide brush: beautiful, ugly, sparse, built, and everything in between, because that's exactly what a city is: a combination of everything.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,365 posts, read 1,461,815 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
I know and I understand. I'm just saying, there are areas just like that. (Kingwood is technically part of Houston anyway.) However, my point is that it's very difficult to paint any large city with such a wide brush: beautiful, ugly, sparse, built, and everything in between, because that's exactly what a city is: a combination of everything.
Well some people like to argue that Houston is "just as bad" as any other city and that it's "ugliness" is just the result of being very large, and I simply do not agree with that. It's probably about personal preference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 06:14 PM
 
739 posts, read 1,309,574 times
Reputation: 336
probably because its near the gulf of mexico. Houston does plant palm trees and flowers and stuff. I always thought Dallas highways were quite ugly. Except for some of 75 they don't even mow the grass. I think its because when people from the north part of the country hear "gulf of mexico" the first thing they think is oil and oil refinerys and they associate oil and oil refinerys with pollution.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2009, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,831 posts, read 19,092,436 times
Reputation: 6647
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMcCoySays View Post
I like to pretend that wouldn't be the case lol. And parts of Houston already look like the A. Especially up around Bush Airport.

Yep.

Do you mean of the big cities or the best location period? Because if we're talking about the all around best location, I would say it's the Jacksonville/Rusk/Gilmer/South Tyler areas. Nice hills and tall forests.
The Tyler area is nice, but I prefer the Austin area. We use to go to Tyler to spend time at the The Villages (I think it's outside of Tyler). Very secluded and nice! Right by the lake.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:06 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top