U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 04-23-2010, 12:26 AM
 
11,392 posts, read 17,480,844 times
Reputation: 5297

Advertisements

Houston Area Survey looks at where -- and how -- we want to live | khou.com | khou.com Local News

Lots of comments on the KHOU site as to the reliability of these figures, but maybe people's minds really are changing some?

Figure this is more productive than a gripe thread, though it stands to become one sooner or later.

Let's get this out of the way right now - this isn't New York City. Onward. Discuss. Houston.

Honestly I don't know so much that it's the lack of traditional zoning that makes you see what you see but the ordinances that work in place of zoning, regulating parking space, setbacks and such. Basically it's zoning that's just not called such. If businesses have to provide parking, it's cheaper to have surface parking than to build a garage, and this has to do with why you have anomalies like a suburban-style CVS in Midtown, which is supposed to be the urban core here.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-23-2010, 02:07 AM
 
1,106 posts, read 1,474,176 times
Reputation: 915
It's coming. Not now, maybe not soon, but it's definitely coming.

I have many complaints about the way Houston is right now. It's certainly not the worst city in the world but it is definitely hampered by some problems.

However, anyone who has lived in Houston long enough can tell you that a transformation is on its way. It won't happen overnight but when it does happen, Houston will be a lot sexier. I think the first step is finishing the damned light rail lines.

People definitely want Houston to change. People realize that a city of this size really needs to step up the pace.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 02:51 AM
 
Location: houston/sugarland
734 posts, read 468,626 times
Reputation: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by glorplaxy View Post
It's coming. Not now, maybe not soon, but it's definitely coming.

I have many complaints about the way Houston is right now. It's certainly not the worst city in the world but it is definitely hampered by some problems.

However, anyone who has lived in Houston long enough can tell you that a transformation is on its way. It won't happen overnight but when it does happen, Houston will be a lot sexier. I think the first step is finishing the damned light rail lines.

People definitely want Houston to change. People realize that a city of this size really needs to step up the pace.
I agree, I think its time to build from the inner neighborhoods then outwards(but NOT Gentrification) , INSTEAD of letting the developers just pick where the next hype neighborhood is going to be. But, unfortunately Houstonians buy into the "shiny new" developments that keeps feeding the developers.

I really like the news presentation. However, the comments at the bottom suggest that the "media" is after their livelihood and the comments also seem like they want to stop any type of REAL development to help Houston look better
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 10:43 AM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,343 posts, read 8,994,580 times
Reputation: 3403
Nice jfre, thanks for posting.

And you're right, there's not a total lack of zoning, because there are city ordinances for land use, right?

A lot of the complaints I hear are more about aesthetics than anything else. Billboards, signanage, clutter, general ugliness. How much prettier would the Houston area be if we could remove every one of the tallest monster billboards and replace them with a little cluster of trees? There is headway being made in this area, fortunately (Scenic Houston, Trees for Houston, etc.) But it can't happen soon enough...

There are many of us who would definitely consider living closer in, but our options are so limited when we don't have $700k+ to spend on decent family home with good public schools. I have many friends in Austin who live in the city, with kids, in nice (but older) neighborhoods that have great public schools. It's not cheap either, but more like like $300k+ homes (certainly more attainable than the $500k+ you often see here for comparable) because there just seem to be more options; they don't have this problem we do in Houston of bad areas spread around randomly, especially with the large number of apartment complexes, so it's just easier there. In Houston it's more like finding a needle in a haystack. Thus, the master-planned communities in the burbs are so popular here and people just go to these.

Developers definitely have some great opportunities to develop more sustainable/walkable, mixed-use and family-friendly developments in town. The question is will they do it, or will they just keep building more crap and more apartments? Maybe it is a good idea for city of Houston to start having more say and more power in this... these days, you need more than just good jobs to attract (and keep) the best.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 12:59 PM
 
1,147 posts, read 1,114,608 times
Reputation: 714
I don't get this. Every city in America, except Houston, has micro-managing governmental land-use planning. And what does it do? Does it prevent acres of ghetto in Philadelphia, Detroit, Chicago, New York and Baltimore? Did it prevent (or precipitate?) urban renewal disasters in San Francisco, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and St. Louis? Why did most cities typically experience their most rapid growth before zoning and begin shrinking after the implementation of zoning? Can anyone actually point out a city where governmental land-use planning was successful across the entire city?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Inner Loop
789 posts, read 915,809 times
Reputation: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by EEstudent View Post
I agree, I think its time to build from the inner neighborhoods then outwards(but NOT Gentrification) , INSTEAD of letting the developers just pick where the next hype neighborhood is going to be. But, unfortunately Houstonians buy into the "shiny new" developments that keeps feeding the developers.

I really like the news presentation. However, the comments at the bottom suggest that the "media" is after their livelihood and the comments also seem like they want to stop any type of REAL development to help Houston look better
^I absolutely agree with this.

And so many people talk about making neighborhoods better. But they don't understand finding a place, maybe fixing it up if it's needed, and staying there for the rest of your life. That's how you make a good neighborhood. People are so use to moving these days. I'm sure people in the old days didn't move nearly as often.

Yes this was off topic a bit, but I just wanted to say it after reading so many posts on this site. I should have made a thread about it, haha.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 01:41 PM
 
8,538 posts, read 9,851,523 times
Reputation: 4262
Quote:
Originally Posted by glorplaxy View Post
It's coming. Not now, maybe not soon, but it's definitely coming.

I have many complaints about the way Houston is right now. It's certainly not the worst city in the world but it is definitely hampered by some problems.

However, anyone who has lived in Houston long enough can tell you that a transformation is on its way. It won't happen overnight but when it does happen, Houston will be a lot sexier. I think the first step is finishing the damned light rail lines.

People definitely want Houston to change. People realize that a city of this size really needs to step up the pace.
I heard the same words.......
















40 years ago...LOL
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
3,394 posts, read 2,556,683 times
Reputation: 1967
What is meant by this statement?

Quote:
Klineberg has done this study for 29 years and said he believes America's future is here and now. In four years, Texas will look like Houston today, he said.
Klineberg goes even further, suggesting that in 20 years, America will look like Houston.
It sounds like he's saying Houston is ahead of the curve, or something. I don't get it. I thought the point of the article is that Houston is trying to go the "other" direction toward more urban areas, but this statement from Klineburg sounds the opposite; as if he's touting Houston as the model for the rest of Texas and America. Perhaps it's just written poorly. Opinions? Thoughts?



IMO, Houston's sprawl is no worse or no better than the DFW area. There's sprawl everywhere here, and I agree there should be better use of the land. In the meantime, they're building farther and farther out in the DFW area.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 02:10 PM
 
Location: The Lone Star State
5,217 posts, read 3,335,711 times
Reputation: 3331
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyev View Post
Can anyone actually point out a city where governmental land-use planning was successful across the entire city?
Austin? For the most part at least.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 02:22 PM
 
Location: ATX-HOU
5,843 posts, read 2,604,785 times
Reputation: 1369
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfre81 View Post
Honestly I don't know so much that it's the lack of traditional zoning that makes you see what you see but the ordinances that work in place of zoning, regulating parking space, setbacks and such. Basically it's zoning that's just not called such. If businesses have to provide parking, it's cheaper to have surface parking than to build a garage, and this has to do with why you have anomalies like a suburban-style CVS in Midtown, which is supposed to be the urban core here.
I agree. I think more ordinances like the Urban Corridor Initiative are needed along major arterials, along with more urban parking requirements, setback, and wider sidewalks.

Generally, I think Houston has done well during these last booms in terms of land use. There are certainly many areas of improvement but Houston has always been a city that constantly reinvents itself.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top