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View Poll Results: Is Houston in East Texas?
Yes 15 19.23%
No 49 62.82%
Umm...yeah, kinda 12 15.38%
Not sure 1 1.28%
Other 1 1.28%
Voters: 78. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-08-2010, 11:34 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 4,426,265 times
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Default Do you consider Houston a part of East Texas?

I'm constantly seeing/hearing people say that houston is no longer (or has never been) a part of east texas, but my question is why not?

is it tyler-texarkana-marshall east texas? no. but it's gulf coastal east texas. it's southeast texas

i've seen some of the silliest reasons for not including houston in this great region: because it's not COVERED in pine trees, it's not hilly, it's not black and white (even though houston historically was), it's not ultra-conservative, there aren't rebel flags everywhere....but the way i see it, if east texas were it's own state, wouldn't houston be like the "downstate" (like nyc is to new york state)?

and let's not forget the fact that greater houston does in fact sit in the far eastern portion of our state. just a short drive from louisiana, at that. so what's the deal?
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:41 PM
 
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Of course!
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:46 PM
 
Location: East Texas
146 posts, read 318,617 times
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well when people say east tx they think of pine trees, houstons northern subbarbs are east tx by area, but houston is in sou heast tx
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:49 PM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 4,426,265 times
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but that's the thing. where is it written that east texas=pine forests? east texas is a diverse region, and i'm waiting for someone to give me a good reason as to why houston should not be included in that region

if houston isn't east texas, what is it? it for sure isn't south texas
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Gringolandia
246 posts, read 457,355 times
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Well, Fort Worth is in the eastern part of Texas, not a lot farther from Louisiana than Houston is. Does that mean Fort Worth is part of East Texas? I can say for a fact that the majority of people in Houston don't even THINK about East Texas, much less think they are a part of it. Houston is Houston. Other than being Texan, we don't define ourselves geographically. If people from other places don't agree with that attitude, we couldn't care less.
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:58 PM
 
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From a strictly geographical point of view, the answer to "is Houston in the eastern portion of the state of Texas?" is yes. It surely isn't in the western part of the state, or the north, or the central.

The Piney Woods stretch southward into far north and east Houston, although development has moved into it. Once you've gone up 59 past Kingwood, you're there.

Culturally though, there's little in common. It may not have always been like this, but 21st century Houston can't really be fit into a regional Texas cultural identity. The city transcends the state where it resides in a lot of ways, and even the nation it sits in.

There is even this cultural divide in places that nominally are within the Houston metro. Take Texas City for an example. My hometown is kind of an isolated place. People receive the Houston TV stations, they might follow the sports teams, but the differences between the culture and mentality there and in the big city could not be more different. Just 35 miles or so separates them in distance, but on a more profound level they're worlds apart.

East Texas, as in places like Lufkin, Longview, Kilgore - they probably fit in better with the "Deep South" than any other place in Texas. A lot of the people there have been there for generations and are descended from people who moved from Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, the Carolinas and a lot of that culture remains. Contrast with Houston, which has seen hundreds of thousands of people from all over the country and the world who are more recent arrivals to Texas.

Geographically, Houston is also in Southeast Texas but once again, there is quite a difference culturally between Houston and Beaumont or Port Arthur or Nederland. There's more of a Cajun influence there, and without the transient nature of those who have moved to Houston in the last few decades.
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Old 06-09-2010, 12:30 AM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 4,426,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfre81 View Post
From a strictly geographical point of view, the answer to "is Houston in the eastern portion of the state of Texas?" is yes. It surely isn't in the western part of the state, or the north, or the central.

The Piney Woods stretch southward into far north and east Houston, although development has moved into it. Once you've gone up 59 past Kingwood, you're there.

Culturally though, there's little in common. It may not have always been like this, but 21st century Houston can't really be fit into a regional Texas cultural identity. The city transcends the state where it resides in a lot of ways, and even the nation it sits in.

There is even this cultural divide in places that nominally are within the Houston metro. Take Texas City for an example. My hometown is kind of an isolated place. People receive the Houston TV stations, they might follow the sports teams, but the differences between the culture and mentality there and in the big city could not be more different. Just 35 miles or so separates them in distance, but on a more profound level they're worlds apart.

East Texas, as in places like Lufkin, Longview, Kilgore - they probably fit in better with the "Deep South" than any other place in Texas. A lot of the people there have been there for generations and are descended from people who moved from Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, the Carolinas and a lot of that culture remains. Contrast with Houston, which has seen hundreds of thousands of people from all over the country and the world who are more recent arrivals to Texas.

Geographically, Houston is also in Southeast Texas but once again, there is quite a difference culturally between Houston and Beaumont or Port Arthur or Nederland. There's more of a Cajun influence there, and without the transient nature of those who have moved to Houston in the last few decades.
so is new york city not really new york? the city is nothing like upstate. the same can pretty much be said of any major city. but you have to look at the city's history, and houston is historically east texas. why does it becoming a global city have to change that?

you could even look at the older/lower income areas of houston and see that the southern culture is definitely there
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Old 06-09-2010, 01:00 AM
 
11,312 posts, read 17,002,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlGreen View Post
so is new york city not really new york?
Culturally NYC hasn't much in common with upstate New York. Even Buffalo has more in common with Pittsburgh or Cleveland than NYC. You could draw similar parallels between Rochester or Syracuse and other midsized cities in the Midwest. There are more similarities there than with NYC.

Quote:
the same can pretty much be said of any major city. but you have to look at the city's history, and houston is historically east texas. why does it becoming a global city have to change that?
Right. Compare Chicago to Rockford, Illinois. What really do they have in common other than both being in northern Illinois and having the same climate more or less? Culturally it's a world of difference, and that comes with a place being a global city. It comes to transcend its physical location.

Quote:
you could even look at the older/lower income areas of houston and see that the southern culture is definitely there
I did a photowalk awhile back that started on Washington Avenue near Shepherd; it went through Old Sixth Ward and into downtown. Somebody on another forum said he thought it looked like I went from Mexico to the Old South into the heart of a major city. And this was a stretch of not quite five miles.

While you're right about portions of Houston being like that, and the Old Sixth is one of them, you won't get that kind of contrast in, say, Lufkin or Hemphill. Houston is simply too dynamic to put in a larger regional category.
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Old 06-09-2010, 06:18 AM
 
Location: 77059
7,697 posts, read 17,678,111 times
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Historically, Houston had German population of about 33% during the early years of statehood. So I suppose that could make us part of Central Texas historically. I also suppose if you wanted to make a "Gulf state" from Brownsville to Port Arthur, then Houston would be considered "upstate."

I personally feel we're at too much of a crossroads to put us in any other region besides "Houston metro." (The same could also be said for Dallas.)
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Old 06-09-2010, 07:36 AM
 
Location: America
5,098 posts, read 4,426,265 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
Historically, Houston had German population of about 33% during the early years of statehood. So I suppose that could make us part of Central Texas historically.
there are parts of the southeast that were historically german

Quote:
I also suppose if you wanted to make a "Gulf state" from Brownsville to Port Arthur, then Houston would be considered "upstate."
houston and the golden triangle region are far more culturally southern than other coastal bend cities like brownsville or corpus. in fact, houston is more southern than pretty much all points west in the state.

Quote:
I personally feel we're at too much of a crossroads to put us in any other region besides "Houston metro." (The same could also be said for Dallas.)
but the point is, houston has to be classified in a region, and it certainly isn't south texas or central texas

and let's not forget that there used to be barely any mexicans in houston
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