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Old 07-29-2013, 10:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silkdashocker View Post
I understand enough about computer science and information systems to be dangerous. While my degree wasn't in CS, i have aquired a CCNA. I agree that a computer science degree will open up many doors, but for you to say that a Forensics degree is useless. You are overstepping the boundaries. Can you prove that those degree's have no value?
A forensic class is useful. The most you need is a certification. A degree is overkill in a small niche area that takes away from the focus from more inportant areas.
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Old 07-30-2013, 11:47 AM
 
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Unless the Forensic program is on the graduate level and the incoming students have science based undergraduate degrees. That would give the students the best of both worlds, especially with more jobs requiring a masters degree to meet the job qualifications and/or because of tough job seeker competition.
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Old 07-31-2013, 09:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PynballWyzyrd View Post
WVU does offer a Master's but it isn't accredited.
That is not true. The masters program at WVU is fully accredited by the appropriate regional accrediting agency. They have not sought specific accreditation for the particular masters degree from that organization. Neither have programs at many other schools.
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Old 07-31-2013, 09:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CTMountaineer View Post
That is not true. The masters program at WVU is fully accredited by the appropriate regional accrediting agency. They have not sought specific accreditation for the particular masters degree from that organization. Neither have programs at many other schools.
Well then they should certainly consider it because the schools in with accreditation seem to be getting more attention.
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Old 08-01-2013, 08:25 AM
 
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They probably should. I think they've been too busy refining their forensic accounting program to get involved with it.
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Old 08-06-2013, 11:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aeros71 View Post
Unless the Forensic program is on the graduate level and the incoming students have science based undergraduate degrees. That would give the students the best of both worlds, especially with more jobs requiring a masters degree to meet the job qualifications and/or because of tough job seeker competition.
aeros71 - You hit the nail on the head.

cry_havoc - You are painting this with too broad of a brush. The Marshall program, that is being discussed here, is a graduate program attended by top students from around the country with degrees in chemistry and biology. The admission requirements are rigorous and admission is highly selective and limited to around twenty students per year according to the program web site. The program itself is housed in the Marshall University Forensic Science Center (MUFSC) which is a working lab and also provides training for crime laboratories throughout the U.S..

You paint forensic science as a worthless degree, but you need to look at the specifics of the degree programs themselves. You insinuate that graduates cannot get jobs, but as I understand it Marshall forensic science graduates are highly sought after and do not have issues finding jobs.

I agree the job prospects in a field like this can be limited (how many city and state crime labs are there anyway) so to me it makes sense that talented chemistry and biology majors attend a two year masters program like Marshall if forensic science is their chosen career. I would certainly hope that if I am ever wrongly accused of a crime that evidence is being analyzed by top professionals with a passion enough for their field to pursue an advance degree.
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Old 08-20-2013, 02:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by goherd View Post
aeros71 - You hit the nail on the head.

cry_havoc - You are painting this with too broad of a brush. The Marshall program, that is being discussed here, is a graduate program attended by top students from around the country with degrees in chemistry and biology. The admission requirements are rigorous and admission is highly selective and limited to around twenty students per year according to the program web site. The program itself is housed in the Marshall University Forensic Science Center (MUFSC) which is a working lab and also provides training for crime laboratories throughout the U.S..

You paint forensic science as a worthless degree, but you need to look at the specifics of the degree programs themselves. You insinuate that graduates cannot get jobs, but as I understand it Marshall forensic science graduates are highly sought after and do not have issues finding jobs.

I agree the job prospects in a field like this can be limited (how many city and state crime labs are there anyway) so to me it makes sense that talented chemistry and biology majors attend a two year masters program like Marshall if forensic science is their chosen career. I would certainly hope that if I am ever wrongly accused of a crime that evidence is being analyzed by top professionals with a passion enough for their field to pursue an advance degree.
I'm sure Marshall has a good rep in this field but it doesn't matter. At the end of the day the vast majority of grads won't work in forensics and the science credentials will triumpth the forensic ones. Nobody is going to care if you went to Marshall. Forensics is a profit center degree. It is an area that universities make a ton of money off of while not giving a good degree. A forensic degree isn't even needed to go into forensics. It is like taking mechanical engineering to become a mechanic.

I'm not putting Marshall down. I'm putting the whole field down.
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Old 08-21-2013, 02:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goherd View Post
aeros71 - You hit the nail on the head.

cry_havoc - You are painting this with too broad of a brush. The Marshall program, that is being discussed here, is a graduate program attended by top students from around the country with degrees in chemistry and biology. The admission requirements are rigorous and admission is highly selective and limited to around twenty students per year according to the program web site. The program itself is housed in the Marshall University Forensic Science Center (MUFSC) which is a working lab and also provides training for crime laboratories throughout the U.S..

You paint forensic science as a worthless degree, but you need to look at the specifics of the degree programs themselves. You insinuate that graduates cannot get jobs, but as I understand it Marshall forensic science graduates are highly sought after and do not have issues finding jobs.

I agree the job prospects in a field like this can be limited (how many city and state crime labs are there anyway) so to me it makes sense that talented chemistry and biology majors attend a two year masters program like Marshall if forensic science is their chosen career. I would certainly hope that if I am ever wrongly accused of a crime that evidence is being analyzed by top professionals with a passion enough for their field to pursue an advance degree.
Possibly the most dubious aspect of the program at Marshall is their association with the State Police crime lab. You might not remember this, but that particular lab had an analyst who intentionally falsified test results resulting in improper convictions of many people charged with crimes, who were not guilty. Some served lengthy prison terms. It has been some years now, but the name Zinn comes to mind. The FBI has a far more prestigious and tamper proof lab.
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Old 08-21-2013, 02:45 PM
 
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Fred Zain is the name you are looking for.

Who was Fred Zain? - The Herald Dispatch

Scores of Convictions Reviewed as Chemist Faces Perjury Accusations : Forensics: Fred Zain's expert testimony and lab tests helped put scores of rapists and murderers behind bars. But college transcript shows he flunked some chemistry classes and bar

Also trying to link the MU Forensic program to situations and incidents, these happened well before the MU program was in existence by the way, the WV State police had in the past is a leap even Evel Knievel couldn't make.
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Old 08-21-2013, 04:10 PM
 
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From the article above:

> Zain worked as a serologist for the West Virginia State Police from 1980 to 1989

a) The West Virginia State Police Forensic Laboratory is in South Charleston, WV, not at Marshall. Marshall houses the West Virginia's Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) laboratory facility.

b) The West Virginia Board of Trustees approved the foundation of the Marshall University Forensic Science Graduate Program and established the West Virginia Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) under the authority of the West Virginia State Police at Marshall in 1994.

CTMountaineer - there is nothing "dubious" about the Marshall University Forensic Science Center or the forensic science graduate program.

cry_havoc - you say "Nobody is going to care if you went to Marshall. Forensics is a profit center degree" which could not be further from the truth in regard to the Marshall University Forensic Science Center and forensic graduate program. This center provides training for laboratories across the country and the graduates of the Masters program are in high demand because of the rigorous education (including a mandatory internship) and the reputation of the program. Do you live near Huntington? Perhaps you should stop by Marshall and do some first hand research and report back.
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