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Old 12-13-2013, 01:06 AM
 
1,614 posts, read 596,891 times
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Huntington has undergone many changes in the past few years. What will the city be like in ten, twenty years? Please keep it apolitica (unless
discussing legal ir structural changes, such as annexation, home rule, regionalization and the like), thoughtful, and respectful. Feel free to include other parts of the Tri-State, and to discuss what you think it will be
like and/or what it ideally will be like, regarding any aspect of the city or of life in the area.

Last edited by robertbrianbush; 12-13-2013 at 01:29 AM.. Reason: Correct typo
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Old 12-13-2013, 10:53 AM
 
748 posts, read 1,357,177 times
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Probably wiped off the map with no jobs, crime, and drugs. I saw on the news this morning for four people was shot and one killed. Good lord the state of WV just needs to go, there aint a thing there except the above mentioned. Shoot Huntington wont ever get any better only worse, people in WV don't want progress they just want the same ol crappy things as before. Give the people of Huntington a new restaurant and they think they have REALLY done some thing. Heaven forbid anyone bring business, things to do and so on, my my that may actually make it a big city and make it a place worth living in, oh heavens no don't want that. It's a poor city, in a poor state with poor broke trashy people....it will never get any better. So my answer is I bet if I come back to Huntington in 10 years it will still the the same crap but a different day, but more then likely worse. Downtown Huntington looks like a dang ghetto, but shoot that's basically all it is now, and probably all it ever will be. You can put in 10 new restaurants and some silly dog park but really, it's just a joke...Huntington has no idea what progress even is. I think any part of WV esp in that area is just going to get worse. Man CK is just turned into trash the Mexicans and the blacks are starting to ruin it. Not that it wasn't ruined before with drugs and gossip, but it was better then having the trash move in. Barboursville is pretty nice but I was noticing a change before I moved, and the trash from Huntington was slowly creeping up there and I was noticing a difference in some parts. I don't have a sunny outlook at all for the state of WV and least of all Huntington, but it's a cycle and poor is poor and it won't change until the peoples / governments / business owners thinking does and I doubt that will happen any time soon.
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Old 12-13-2013, 02:51 PM
 
1,575 posts, read 1,795,666 times
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Seriously, this is a positive thread (he specifically mentioned keep it respectful). We all know you hate everything about Huntington and WV, so it's not like you're giving us any news here. Please, if you are going to be negative, avoid these boards. There's no need for it.
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Old 12-13-2013, 07:51 PM
 
941 posts, read 1,050,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elewis7 View Post
Seriously, this is a positive thread (he specifically mentioned keep it respectful). We all know you hate everything about Huntington and WV, so it's not like you're giving us any news here. Please, if you are going to be negative, avoid these boards. There's no need for it.
I concur.
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Old 12-13-2013, 08:16 PM
 
1,575 posts, read 1,795,666 times
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And, back to the OP. I'm not very familiar with Huntington so it's hard for me to say one way or another what will happen. I know I'd like to see greater access to the riverfront, development of the ACF property (see: ballpark), expansion of the PATH, build-out of 4th Ave between downtown and Marshall, and a combination of more people and annexation to push the population over 50,000 (and, hopefully, past Charleston for competition's sake).

The fun thing is that I'm moving to Huntington in June so I'll actually get to see it happen!
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Old 12-13-2013, 10:00 PM
 
941 posts, read 1,050,575 times
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I have a very positive outlook towards the City of Huntington.

Population
In ten years Huntington could quite possibly be the largest city in the state by both proper and metro populations. It's borders will have been expanded and there will be an slight increase in the population density towards the core of the city. The suburbs around the city will most likely have the most growth, as is the case in most cities in the US. Since WV is always a few years behind most other areas of the country, it might be possible to predict its growth patterns by what is going on elsewhere. Urban sprawl is slowing down and city centers population loss has begun to slowly reverse. This will probably be the case with Huntington, but on a smaller scale.

Cityscape
I imagine that this will be visibly different in 10 years time and very very different in 20 years time. There are improvements being made all over the city right now with many more in the works.

I speculate that vacant industrial properties will be where the greatest change will occur. Many industrial properties along the city's main thoroughfares will most likely be occupied by commercial and/or some private presence. This will be especially true with the areas closest to downtown and Marshall University. Look for development along 5th and 3rd Avenues in between 22nd and 25th Streets. Marshall University will also be acquiring land around itself and expanding.

Hal Greer Blvd
Hal Greer Blvd will be super busy and dense with traffic and commercial activity. Look for some apartment complexes start to arise with the expansion of the Forensic Science program and medical school. The projects will be gone and in its place will be commercial developments (this includes the vacant lot across the street), most likely a large grocery store.

West End
The West End will be in the middle of a revival in 10 years and be starting to thrive in 20 years (maybe sooner). Hopefully, Central City become the "Arts District" that the City envisions. There is a lot of potential here, with a lot of industrial property to redevelop. Central City has a bright future and I anticipate an increase in density here. It will be like a miniature downtown with a hip vibe.

The Southside, Walnut Hills, ect.
The Southern neighborhoods is where I believe a lot of expansion will take place in the form of land annexation and an increase in housing stock. Some of the cities best housing stock is in the area and I believe that it will stay this way.

Guyandotte and Altizer (i.e. Far East Side)
Guyandotte and Altizer are the most unpredictable areas to predict. As much as I want to believe that these areas will prosper, I feel like they will be the most stagnant in Huntington.

Highlawn
The Highlawn neighborhood is in for some change. There are some really nice condos that are finished or are almost finished being built there. The Highlawn Baptist Church was just sold to some bidder and will likely be redeveloped for the hospital or some other purpose.

Highlawn is unique because it has the most diverse mix of housing stock and the best access to amenities. Downtown is just a mile away, while Marshall is even closer, and St. Mary's Hospital is in its cre. It certainly has all of the shopping you need to get through day-to-day life. The Huntington Mall also is only a 10-15 min drive away (depending location). Highlawn is also one of the few, it may be the only, neighborhood with direct access to the river without the flood wall being in the way. It also has a nice community park with free access to tennis and basketball courts.

Why mention all of this if we are talking about development 10-20 years down the road? This is because future development will recognize these neighborhood traits and take advantage of them. Look for development in the western side of the neighborhood, such as more student housing. The property value will go up if there as well if the old ACF properties are redeveloped.

Westmoreland
This neighborhood will continue to be a residential neighborhood and will increase population, along with the Ceredo-Kenova area. I will attribute this to the developments in Prichard, WV (if you are unfamiliar with these then I can explain more with citations). I am not sure how much this growth will be but a few hundred people is very possible. I would very doubt that you will see anything in the thousands, but I won't rule it out.

Downtown/Marshall
Marshall has some changes hopefully coming in the next 10-20 years. Just check out their 10-year Master Plan for that info.

Downtown has been changing for the better for the past few years. This is where there will be an increase in density, if not anywhere else. This will be due to both Marshall's expansions and current developers. There are some vacant offices and apartments/condos downtown that are filling up fast. If this continues then there will be a demand begin to arise. I will say that in 20 years, there will be no vacant lots downtown and the property value will be increased.

Crime
Despite recent events, crime has gotten better in the city. Recently, the city received a grant to hire more police officers and they anticipate hiring more in the future. This will hopefully help keep crime down.

Economy
Assuming most of the above will come to fruition, the economy will certainly flourish. I can tell you now that the city's surplus has been getting larger each year, most likely due to the recent increase in construction.

Final Note
If I have missed anything, then others will surely fill in.
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Old 12-13-2013, 10:44 PM
 
9,401 posts, read 11,464,116 times
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Although I expect that Marshall will continue to shoot itself in the foot by neglecting their current programming, employees, faculty, and students in ill advised expansion moves, I believe the City of Huntington will experience a major rebirth in its natural position as a transportation hub. It's position on the Ohio River along with ready major rail access will permit the city to flourish, especially if they join with other Ohio River cities to get the expressway development of WV Route 2 from Huntington to Chester in place to take advantage of the Shale oil and gas developments further upstream.

They need to break away from the negativity of southern WV politics and cooperate with upstream areas to promote progress along the entire Ohio River corridor. That is where Huntington's future naturally lies, and if there is any forward thinking at all still in that city they will devote their efforts in that manner.
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Huntington, WV
4,153 posts, read 6,855,022 times
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To quickly address the first response, if you hate WV as much as you claim, why waste your time searching WV news reports and posting on a WV forum? And as a tip, true happiness can only be found within and can be applied just about anywhere. Rarely will you find true long-term happiness based solely on your surroundings. Hopefully you can find some inner happiness for yourself.

Where I see Huntington in 10 years, I agree with almost all of what Pynball said. I think you will see better use of downtown buildings which will then lead to the need for more construction. I think this will be especially true along 4th Ave where the connection and convenience to Marshall make it a natural place for mixed use buildings with businesses in the lower levels and apartments up top. This will fill in some of the current gaps and add to the feel of downtown.


Based on this growth, I feel that the Southside neighborhood will see the first benefits. The 10th Street Corridor is ripe for redevelopment and to provide a greater connection between the Riverfront and Ritter Park. The PATH goes through here and being in the Southside, it will be sure investment that will increase property values all around. This will hopefully lead to further renovations in existing homes, especially once a historic district can be established here. I think Highlawn will also see similar growth but I think the growth there will be slower.

The Hal Greer area has tremendous potential being on a main thorough fair and wedged between the hospital and Marshall. I think the future here depends on how much private development occurs. If they can get a grocery store and some serious redevelopment along 16th street, Cabell Huntington buys more from the 13th Ave side and Marshall could make some plans for future expansion along the railroad tracks, this would make that area ripe for new development based on the current low property values. I think this type of improvement would be more along the lines of a 30 year change though as opposed to 10 years.

The ACF property has the biggest opportunity to really change the feel of Huntington. If they add further retail development, a new downtown hotel and conference center on the river, a Marshall Baseball field, etc that would be a big plus. I would even like to see a new train station added there with higher visibility and convenience as I think it would see more use.

I also think that 14th Street West will see some good growth. I'm really glad that they are being proactive with this because if this change can occur before they get I-73/74 rerouted through there, the potential will be exponentially increased once that opens.

Add to this the plans to annex areas and increase new housing stock on the perimeter of the city and I think Huntington could be pushing 55-60,000 people over the next 10-15 years based on annexation and real growth.

With a much more attractive Huntington, I think Marshall will see some growth, regardless of the naysayers. I think over the next 20 years, Marshall could see some growth to about 20,000 students, especially with current and planned improvements and growth of degree programs. The growth of the city and Marshall will continue to act synergistically and each will encourage new growth in the other.

Either way, Huntington is definitely headed in the right direction. Sections of downtown that were nearly devoid of businesses are now almost completely full. You are seeing the upper floor of buildings that set empty for years now being turned into condos and office space. Once the new Visual Arts Center opens downtown, you'll then have an extra 500 students downtown that will need places to eat and shop and will want to live as close to school and work as they can. Huntington has already improved exponentially in the last 10 years and with the momentum we currently have, in another 10 years I think the city will be in a really good place. Given 30 more years, barring any unforeseen circumstances, I think the sky is the limit for Huntington. This is as long as the residents and leadership here keep pushing for more and better and never stay satisfied with where we currently are but look to constantly improve and stay ahead of the change.
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Old 12-14-2013, 04:10 PM
 
9,401 posts, read 11,464,116 times
Reputation: 1507
Quote:
Originally Posted by tbailey1138 View Post
To quickly address the first response, if you hate WV as much as you claim, why waste your time searching WV news reports and posting on a WV forum? And as a tip, true happiness can only be found within and can be applied just about anywhere. Rarely will you find true long-term happiness based solely on your surroundings. Hopefully you can find some inner happiness for yourself.

Where I see Huntington in 10 years, I agree with almost all of what Pynball said. I think you will see better use of downtown buildings which will then lead to the need for more construction. I think this will be especially true along 4th Ave where the connection and convenience to Marshall make it a natural place for mixed use buildings with businesses in the lower levels and apartments up top. This will fill in some of the current gaps and add to the feel of downtown.


Based on this growth, I feel that the Southside neighborhood will see the first benefits. The 10th Street Corridor is ripe for redevelopment and to provide a greater connection between the Riverfront and Ritter Park. The PATH goes through here and being in the Southside, it will be sure investment that will increase property values all around. This will hopefully lead to further renovations in existing homes, especially once a historic district can be established here. I think Highlawn will also see similar growth but I think the growth there will be slower.

The Hal Greer area has tremendous potential being on a main thorough fair and wedged between the hospital and Marshall. I think the future here depends on how much private development occurs. If they can get a grocery store and some serious redevelopment along 16th street, Cabell Huntington buys more from the 13th Ave side and Marshall could make some plans for future expansion along the railroad tracks, this would make that area ripe for new development based on the current low property values. I think this type of improvement would be more along the lines of a 30 year change though as opposed to 10 years.

The ACF property has the biggest opportunity to really change the feel of Huntington. If they add further retail development, a new downtown hotel and conference center on the river, a Marshall Baseball field, etc that would be a big plus. I would even like to see a new train station added there with higher visibility and convenience as I think it would see more use.

I also think that 14th Street West will see some good growth. I'm really glad that they are being proactive with this because if this change can occur before they get I-73/74 rerouted through there, the potential will be exponentially increased once that opens.

Add to this the plans to annex areas and increase new housing stock on the perimeter of the city and I think Huntington could be pushing 55-60,000 people over the next 10-15 years based on annexation and real growth.

With a much more attractive Huntington, I think Marshall will see some growth, regardless of the naysayers. I think over the next 20 years, Marshall could see some growth to about 20,000 students, especially with current and planned improvements and growth of degree programs. The growth of the city and Marshall will continue to act synergistically and each will encourage new growth in the other.

Either way, Huntington is definitely headed in the right direction. Sections of downtown that were nearly devoid of businesses are now almost completely full. You are seeing the upper floor of buildings that set empty for years now being turned into condos and office space. Once the new Visual Arts Center opens downtown, you'll then have an extra 500 students downtown that will need places to eat and shop and will want to live as close to school and work as they can. Huntington has already improved exponentially in the last 10 years and with the momentum we currently have, in another 10 years I think the city will be in a really good place. Given 30 more years, barring any unforeseen circumstances, I think the sky is the limit for Huntington. This is as long as the residents and leadership here keep pushing for more and better and never stay satisfied with where we currently are but look to constantly improve and stay ahead of the change.
While I don't disagree with much of what you're saying, I believe that won't happen unless they change the focus there. The things you are pointing out are continuations of the failed policies of the past that have not really caused more than cosmetic changes to the city. You are not going to get Marshall to 20,000 students in 10 years by adding more and more programs (the Kopp model). Doing that will simply continue to alienate faculty and staff, and weaken existing offerings. They've added 3 programs in the past few years and have fewer students since doing so. Take a look at the historic enrollment figures there for the past 20 years, then look at all the money they have poured into new buildings and programs, and compare current enrollment with that of the past. The intended results have not taken place, and the faculty there has lost faith in the school's leadership.

The real future there lies in being more closely tied in with developments to the north. If they follow that path, many of the developments you mentioned will take place.
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Old 12-14-2013, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Huntington, WV
4,153 posts, read 6,855,022 times
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What you don't apparently see is that the focus HAS changed here, significantly. Our leaders in the past have not been business friendly and they have been reactive with policies, looking only to tread water so to speak. The current leaders are much more proactive, looking at what we can do to be a better city and actually grow rather than simply fight to maintain. With regards to Marshall, the programs you mentioned have just started and haven't even gained accreditation. Give them time and they will work.

Crime still happens, as it does with any city, but our levels here are at historical lows. We have more businesses downtown now than at any time over the last 30 years and downtown living is making a big comeback. These things are already in the process of taking place. And while I'm sure if the opportunity exists to improve the infrastructure of WV 2, our leaders will do what they can to support it. But at the same time, they aren't going to sit around waiting and complaining for the state to do something, they are going to work on the things we can control. Many such initiatives have been started by the residents here through Create Huntington simply by coming up with an idea and being connected to the resources to make it happen. Route 2 expansion would be nice but the Ohio River would be just as good for the transportation of the materials you are talking about. Probably more efficient too. Ashland Oil ships products up sand down the river every day and the river never needs to be widened or repaved. Where there's a will, there's a way.
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