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Old 06-01-2018, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
2,030 posts, read 910,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BamaDave View Post
Agree. The vast majority of land areas, even in the general locations where strong tornadoes have typically tracked, have never experienced the core of a strong tornado. Even the bad ones affect relatively small swaths of land. They are not like hurricanes that can impact many many square miles of land area at once.
Very true, but if you happen to be unfortunate enough to be directly in the path of one, it's Katie bar the door.

I remember the '74 tornadoes, as well as the '89 one in Jones Valley, and in both cases I knew people at work who had devastating damage, and even a fatality. That leads one to believe that the damage swath is more than one might think, since the number of my friends isn't THAT large. When more than 300 people are killed in one tornado outbreak in the state, the tragedy cannot be overstated. We've never had a hurricane that even came close to that number, although the areal coverage might be much higher.
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Old 06-01-2018, 08:33 PM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,399 posts, read 2,155,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketDawg View Post
When more than 300 people are killed in one tornado outbreak in the state, the tragedy cannot be overstated.
Just that Hackleburg/Phil Campbell tornado alone killed 72 people.....

2011 Hackleburg–Phil Campbell, Alabama tornado - Wikipedia
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Old 06-03-2018, 05:53 AM
 
Location: North of Birmingham, AL
264 posts, read 203,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketDawg View Post
Very true, but if you happen to be unfortunate enough to be directly in the path of one, it's Katie bar the door.

I remember the '74 tornadoes, as well as the '89 one in Jones Valley, and in both cases I knew people at work who had devastating damage, and even a fatality. That leads one to believe that the damage swath is more than one might think, since the number of my friends isn't THAT large. When more than 300 people are killed in one tornado outbreak in the state, the tragedy cannot be overstated. We've never had a hurricane that even came close to that number, although the areal coverage might be much higher.
Do you mean in Alabama? Hurricane Katrina killed over 1,000 people in Louisiana and Mississippi.
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Old 06-03-2018, 08:24 AM
 
3,966 posts, read 1,593,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
Owens Crossroads is between the track of two long-lived violent tornadoes that occurred on Apr 27 2011, the Hackleburg/Phil Campbell one and the Cullman one. The Cullman tornado passed just a few miles south of Owens Crossroads. There is nothing in the climatology or geography of the place that would say Owens Crossroads is more or less likely to receive a direct hit than those locations that did get hit.
I'm not sure I would agree with that. Owens Crossroads sits on the eastern side of a pronounced ridgeline. Meanwhile, if you look at all the paths of Madison County's tornados over the years, they all have the same pattern: They move in nice straight lines over the flat, western portion of Madison County, and then peter out once they hit the hills. That doesn't mean tornados can't hit mountainous areas, but it seems to affect both their formation and path.

If you look at Jackson County immediately to the east, tornados in the mountainous section are rare and relatively weak, while the tornados that form in the Tennessee River valley portion of the county are stronger and more plentiful.

None of that is to say that a strong tornado couldn't hit Owens Cross Roads. But I would guess that, statistically speaking, the odds are less likely. I mean, over the course of several decades, no less than ten tornados have hit in the Harvest area, three of them F5s and one an F4. I'm not sure I would blithely state that it's no more than a statistical anomaly.
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Old 06-03-2018, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
2,030 posts, read 910,767 times
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Originally Posted by BamaDave View Post
Do you mean in Alabama? Hurricane Katrina killed over 1,000 people in Louisiana and Mississippi.
Yes.
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Old 06-03-2018, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
152 posts, read 53,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
I'm not sure I would agree with that. Owens Crossroads sits on the eastern side of a pronounced ridgeline. Meanwhile, if you look at all the paths of Madison County's tornados over the years, they all have the same pattern: They move in nice straight lines over the flat, western portion of Madison County, and then peter out once they hit the hills. That doesn't mean tornados can't hit mountainous areas, but it seems to affect both their formation and path.

If you look at Jackson County immediately to the east, tornados in the mountainous section are rare and relatively weak, while the tornados that form in the Tennessee River valley portion of the county are stronger and more plentiful.

None of that is to say that a strong tornado couldn't hit Owens Cross Roads. But I would guess that, statistically speaking, the odds are less likely. I mean, over the course of several decades, no less than ten tornados have hit in the Harvest area, three of them F5s and one an F4. I'm not sure I would blithely state that it's no more than a statistical anomaly.

It's true that tornadoes tend to be less common in mountainous terrain which makes sense as the air is cooler and thus less dynamic at higher altitude. There's a lot less tornadoes in higher Appalachia than in the lowlands around it.



But I don't know if I'd fully buy into it as an insurance policy for Owen's Crossroads as the area is at the outskirts of that mountainous region and we're not exactly talking about massive mountains at that point either. We've certainly seen tornadoes cross ridges of such a magnitude. Pisgah and Flat Rock on Sand Mountain were hit by a strong tornado on April 27 and that tornado came up the mountain from the Tennessee River valley just like that.
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Old 06-03-2018, 12:16 PM
 
3,966 posts, read 1,593,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
It's true that tornadoes tend to be less common in mountainous terrain which makes sense as the air is cooler and thus less dynamic at higher altitude. There's a lot less tornadoes in higher Appalachia than in the lowlands around it.



But I don't know if I'd fully buy into it as an insurance policy for Owen's Crossroads as the area is at the outskirts of that mountainous region and we're not exactly talking about massive mountains at that point either. We've certainly seen tornadoes cross ridges of such a magnitude. Pisgah and Flat Rock on Sand Mountain were hit by a strong tornado on April 27 and that tornado came up the mountain from the Tennessee River valley just like that.
That's true, but that's not what I'm saying. I'm only pointing out that they are less likely to occur. If you look at the sheer density of tornados in the flatlands to the west of Huntsville or to the SE of Huntsville in the Tennessee Valley, I would argue that the hilly terrain must have some inhibiting effect.
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