U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alabama > Huntsville-Madison-Decatur area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-23-2018, 09:38 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,873 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

What kind of tornado activity has there been in Owens Crossroads? Is it a safe place to live?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-23-2018, 09:57 AM
 
Location: California → Tennessee → Ohio
1,457 posts, read 2,503,085 times
Reputation: 1008
They get EF5's!

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2018, 10:12 AM
 
7,937 posts, read 3,700,607 times
Reputation: 24009
Here's a useful map. While any location can be hit by a tornado, there are areas where they are more prevalent, both in frequency and strength. Owens Crossroads is removed from the high traffic areas. Meanwhile, I wouldn't live northwest of Huntsville on a bet, or at least without a reinforced concrete tornado shelter in my basement:

Tornado History Project: Madison County, Alabama
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 08:37 AM
 
Location: North of Birmingham, AL
689 posts, read 436,742 times
Reputation: 848
Quote:
Originally Posted by caliguy92832 View Post
They get EF5's!

That tornado didn't affect Owen's Crossroads, nor was it EF5 intensity in the Huntsville metropolitan area or at the location where that video was recorded (still very bad, though).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
5,312 posts, read 3,069,206 times
Reputation: 3970
Quote:
Originally Posted by BamaDave View Post
That tornado didn't affect Owen's Crossroads, nor was it EF5 intensity in the Huntsville metropolitan area or at the location where that video was recorded (still very bad, though).
Yeah, I'm pretty sure that was the huge EF-5 at Hackleburg/Phil Campbell in late April 2011. Based on the accents of the two taking the video, that assessment fits.

That one was without a doubt the most destructive storm I've ever seen. We travel that route when we go to ballgames in Starkville, and there was literally total destruction for miles. Apparently the tornado pretty much traveled the route of the highway from just outside Hamilton to east of Hackleburg. There's still visible evidence of the damage today.

That one continued on to west of Huntsville, but had lost some of its strength by the time it got this far up. It was still strong enough to destroy main power feed lines from the Brown's Ferry nuclear plant.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-29-2018, 02:07 PM
 
375 posts, read 541,406 times
Reputation: 271
Based upon the Tornado History Project site, Owens Crossroads is considerably much safer than Madison and West Huntsville.

Those houses on County Line Rd are just asking for it!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-29-2018, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
2,809 posts, read 1,075,342 times
Reputation: 6761
Owens Crossroads is between the track of two long-lived violent tornadoes that occurred on Apr 27 2011, the Hackleburg/Phil Campbell one and the Cullman one. The Cullman tornado passed just a few miles south of Owens Crossroads. There is nothing in the climatology or geography of the place that would say Owens Crossroads is more or less likely to receive a direct hit than those locations that did get hit.


It bears pointing out that tornadoes - even big ones - have fairly small-scale impact and as a result you may never see one in your neighborhood even if you like in a tornado-prone area like Northern Alabama. At the same time, you might get hit a number of times over the years..it's mostly a matter of luck.


If one is very safety-conscious, a fully underground basement or tornado shelter would be advisable in this area either way. Some tornadoes are simply not survivable above ground. If one prefers to save the money and relies on never 'winning' the tornado lottery, then one should at least have a tornado safety plan and have ways of staying informed and up-to-date regarding hazardous weather.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-29-2018, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
5,312 posts, read 3,069,206 times
Reputation: 3970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
Owens Crossroads is between the track of two long-lived violent tornadoes that occurred on Apr 27 2011, the Hackleburg/Phil Campbell one and the Cullman one. The Cullman tornado passed just a few miles south of Owens Crossroads. There is nothing in the climatology or geography of the place that would say Owens Crossroads is more or less likely to receive a direct hit than those locations that did get hit.


It bears pointing out that tornadoes - even big ones - have fairly small-scale impact and as a result you may never see one in your neighborhood even if you like in a tornado-prone area like Northern Alabama. At the same time, you might get hit a number of times over the years..it's mostly a matter of luck.


If one is very safety-conscious, a fully underground basement or tornado shelter would be advisable in this area either way. Some tornadoes are simply not survivable above ground. If one prefers to save the money and relies on never 'winning' the tornado lottery, then one should at least have a tornado safety plan and have ways of staying informed and up-to-date regarding hazardous weather.
I agree with what you say, but it does indeed "seem" like the Havest area has more tornado damage than other areas around here. But, as you say, there's really no scientific evidence that one area in this vicinity is more prone to damage than another.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2018, 09:43 AM
 
Location: North of Birmingham, AL
689 posts, read 436,742 times
Reputation: 848
Yeah, that video was taken at the Limestone Correctional Facility. I think the tornado was at a strong EF-4 intensity when it passed that area. Horrible day!

Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketDawg View Post
Yeah, I'm pretty sure that was the huge EF-5 at Hackleburg/Phil Campbell in late April 2011. Based on the accents of the two taking the video, that assessment fits.

That one was without a doubt the most destructive storm I've ever seen. We travel that route when we go to ballgames in Starkville, and there was literally total destruction for miles. Apparently the tornado pretty much traveled the route of the highway from just outside Hamilton to east of Hackleburg. There's still visible evidence of the damage today.

That one continued on to west of Huntsville, but had lost some of its strength by the time it got this far up. It was still strong enough to destroy main power feed lines from the Brown's Ferry nuclear plant.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-01-2018, 09:45 AM
 
Location: North of Birmingham, AL
689 posts, read 436,742 times
Reputation: 848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veritas Vincit View Post
It bears pointing out that tornadoes - even big ones - have fairly small-scale impact and as a result you may never see one in your neighborhood even if you like in a tornado-prone area like Northern Alabama. At the same time, you might get hit a number of times over the years..it's mostly a matter of luck.
Agree. The vast majority of land areas, even in the general locations where strong tornadoes have typically tracked, have never experienced the core of a strong tornado. Even the bad ones affect relatively small swaths of land. They are not like hurricanes that can impact many many square miles of land area at once.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alabama > Huntsville-Madison-Decatur area
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top