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Old 11-19-2006, 02:21 PM
 
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Could you please advise what would be a pretty safe area from hurricanes, I was looking at the different areas.
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Old 11-19-2006, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whirlwind View Post
Could you please advise what would be a pretty safe area from hurricanes, I was looking at the different areas.
I would say the north central part of the state might be in the safer location. But hurricanes can create horror away from the coast. Tornados, floods, and wind can affect any part of the state.

Take a look at the following site for info on survival guide: http://redcross.tallytown.com/hsg.html (broken link)
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Old 11-19-2006, 02:41 PM
 
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I would say in no area of Florida would you be safe from a storm.
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Old 11-19-2006, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
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Take a look at the ACCUWEATHER site, great info...

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hur...act=stormfacts


Hurricaneville is also a good source, like their presentations...
http://www.hurricaneville.com/facts.html

Last edited by sunrico90; 11-19-2006 at 02:54 PM.. Reason: added site
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Old 11-19-2006, 03:26 PM
 
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Florida is a peninsula. Spin the wheel....
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Old 11-19-2006, 03:53 PM
 
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If you build right or buy right, you will be safe anywhere in Florida. New construction codes require cement block with rebar reinforcement and more cement poured in the holes. The homes come with builder-supplied shutters, the garage doors are reinforced, and the roofs are trussed. You'll have your own little cement bunker ready to withstand 140 mph winds.

Course you could move to Calif. and take your chances against mud slides and fires, or to the midwest where they have tornadoes.

I wouldn't let the fear of hurricanes keep you from moving down here.
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Old 11-19-2006, 04:25 PM
 
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Check out some of the pictures on this site. some are new homes under the new code.
remember Homestead, Florida is far from the beach or water.
http://www.ultimatechase.com/Index.htm
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Old 11-19-2006, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
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Homestead is within the range of the storm surge under the worst conditions so beware. If you build a home at the proper elevation with a POURED CONCRETE roof and have good window protection you have nothing to worry about. I would take my chances with a cat 5 hurricane in such a home rather than endure an eartquake. Since I may eventually move to the midwest I would have to build even stronger, to withstand 300+ MPH winds of a tornado. My advice, avoid the coast, live under a concrete roof and RELAX! You'll be able to see the hurricane run it's course and be alive and well to help your friends and neighbors. Well that is unless you live in a community where they design your house to fail.
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Old 11-19-2006, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
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A 100% concrete structure will provide the best protection. Now the owner needs to make sure that the distance to a water source will not create a surge that will flood the lot. Therefore; the whole lot has to be prepare to sustain the storm.

Had the opportunity to experience a cat 2 in Puerto Rico and they use 100% concrete on their houses. The residential area developed a problem with the foundation and they had several homes flooded. Basically the water eroded around the house foundation and water and mud damaged the homes.

Not a complete lost, but the owners (Americans) believe that their homes were storm proof and mother nature proof everyone wrong...
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Old 11-19-2006, 11:50 PM
 
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Tallahassee.....they go next to, under and above and rarely through. Of course now they'll get wacked It's just tucked neatly in the corner up there in the panhandle.....
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