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Old 07-29-2020, 03:00 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,007 posts, read 2,104,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
The Southeast corridor is a string of cities that stretches from Utah to Montana along Idaho's eastern boundary.

It begins at the Malad/Bear Lake area, then proceeds to Pocatello, Blackfoot, Idaho Falls, Rexburg, an all the small towns in between, and ends at the Island Park caldera at the Idaho/Montana/Wyoming border at the north.

The corridor is the second-most populated region of the state, following Boise and the Treasure Valley. It's a much larger territory than the TV, so the population is less condensed.

If you study an Idaho state map, you will find the entire center from north to south is lightly populated. All our population here lies along our edges, not in our center.

Essentially, we all live where Idaho is habitable. Our center is mostly too mountainous to ever be inhabited, and where there are no mountains, there are inhabitable lava flows.

The Northern Idaho Panhandle is the remnant strip of territory that was also cut off from Montana and Washington by mountains. NID is cut off from the rest of Idaho by other mountains.
Yes! yes! I am thinking eastern Idaho 3bd. 2 ba. 2+car attached garage up to 1 acre 2,500+ sq. footage preferably not a subdivision (packed like sardines with neighbors) or if it must be a subdivision make it a rural subdivision from Rexburg to Rigby to Blackfoot to Idaho Falls and Twin Falls, Pocatello, Blackfoot, Chubbuck (new homes and or newest homes) to Burley, Firth, Jerome to the Treasure Valley away from (Boise and Eaglefornia)-HATE TRAFFIC AND TRAFFIC SIGNALS But maybe Interested in Kuna, Meridian, Parma, Plymouth to Weiser. That's alot of territory to cover.

Primarily I am looking for the newest home to brand new home and it appears that most of those new/newer properties are in the East part of Idaho has alot of homes like that..
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Old 07-31-2020, 07:44 PM
 
100 posts, read 113,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
I agree with the others; this is not a good time to move at all. Covid-19's economic devastation will continue for a long time, and I don't think recovery will be fast. When recession hits, it has always been slow to come to Idaho, but once it's here, it's always very slow to leave.

There are a lot of advantages in staying put in the place your husband is most familiar with. Since concrete is such a basic requirement in construction, any recession can open up lots of unexpected opportunities in the essential stuff.

But when the time is good, I would consider looking over Idaho Falls as a possible choice. It has always been a very business-oriented city, and one where an entrepreneur can become established. But there will always be some competition here, no matter how exotic the business is.

Idaho Falls is on hold right now due to the virus, just like every other place in the nation. But my home town has some serious prospects for some serious growth in a very sophisticated, advanced industry that's looking to move here.

As a city, I think you might find life here quite pleasant. Our surrounding scenery isn't as impressive as NID, but all the real spectacular scenery is down here. It's all just over the hill or around the bend, and I.F. is in the middle of much of it.

The entire Eastern Idaho corridor is higher and drier than NID. It all lies along the western edge of the Rockies. Idaho Falls straddles the Snake River just south of the convergence. The falls run through the heart of our downtown.
The city is bordered on the east by foothills of the Teton Range, and on the west, it opens up to the Great Snake River plain and the Arco Desert. The plain is bordered by the Lost River Range and the Sawtooths further west, and the northern border is just south of Yellowstone. The closest large city is Salt Lake, 200 mi. to the south.

Idaho Falls services a 200 mile circle around it that includes parts of Wyoming and Montana for everything. Our medical facilities are the second-largest in the state, with only Boise as the largest.

It's always slightly windy here due to the terrain and prevailing winds. But the wind makes the air very fresh and clear as well, and Idaho Falls is sunny in the winters due to the breeze. We get very few temperature inversions, grey days, or log smog here, and what we don't get is fog. Fog is so rare it's comment worthy.

But we can also get some blistering cold spells too, along with massive amounts of powder snow. Our summers are typically in the low-mid 80s, also due to our location, and always a few degrees cooler than Pocatello.

The Teton Valley is colder, though, and the winters there are longer by at least a month. Pocatello is another spot you should look over, as it's quite similar to Idaho Falls and all the other cities down here, but it lies in a more mountainous, more protected location.

Idaho is not a state for anyone who wants a mild climate. From top to bottom, the winters are cold, long, and snowy, and the summer heat can always reach 100 for extended amounts of time.

Life here is very laid-back, but if you've lived all your life in California, you could find it irritating here; we don't have the 24-hour thing going on, and in most of our smaller towns, business is still a 5-day proposition.

There are fewer things to do here than a city in California has, less entertainment, and much fewer choices in lots of things. Newcomers don't always adjust to our differences, or ever come to enjoy life here even if they do.
(My own Grandmother was one. She spent 89 of her 98 years here, but always talked about moving home to Iowa.)

I've known quite a few folks who have moved here expecting Idaho to be their perfect paradise, and have moved back to where they came from after 2 years or less. But I've also known as many who have moved, adjusted quickly, and sank deep roots here.

The only way for you to know what life here is or isn't is to make a serious plan to look the entire state over at least once, and for about a month or more.

Come expecting nothing but surprises- everything you seek can be found, but it will most often be found in the most unexpected places and ways.

Mike, just wanted to say you have some of the best info on these threads I've seen. Really, ever seen. On any state. Well thought out and written.


The only thing I disagreed with on here is the assertion that C19 will be economically devastating for a long time. While it certainly could be, none of us has a crystal ball. Personally, I believe Trump will waive the similar magic wand that he did before to re-energize everything much sooner than any of us would think.


Heck, there are certain industries and metrics that are still doing mostly well that in most scenarios, and w/ any other President, should never be doing well.
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Old 07-31-2020, 07:59 PM
 
100 posts, read 113,611 times
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OP, I'm in a sort of similar situation as your family, so I've been following this thread and learning from it. Great info, everyone.

I think you are doing the right thing by "stackin' cash" as you said, at least for a little while. Yeah, it's probably not the best time in the world to be relocating. If you can hang tight and save, and aren't in a hurry to leave, that's probably the best.

My family & I were also originally political refugees from CO. It went from a Live and Let Live/Moderate type of place to being overtly Blue (I'll be nice ) and heavily controlled by Denver and Boulder. I didn't recognize the state anymore. As a result, we moved to MT and did a stint up there in the NW part of the state. Lots of challenges, but overall really liked the area & really miss the mountains.

Long story short, I'm investigating these ID threads with interest. Specifically, we're looking at the Idaho Falls area. My wife has a potential job op in town and we might need to make a decision on it really soon. Ideally, we'd rather not move in this C19 climate, but in her line of work, ops like this don't always come often.

And if we move, I'll be looking to set up my own small business in the area, as well. I can't say what I do, or I'll big time dox myself, but there isn't another of "me" for over 200 miles away, so the potential for my line of work is quite large in due time. It'll take much work and bumps in the road I'm sure, but I'm dedicated to making it work and have seen the results from others in my field in their locations.

Best of luck to you and your family....hang in there!
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Old 07-31-2020, 08:05 PM
 
100 posts, read 113,611 times
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OP, one other thing I thought of. I believe you said you're ideally wanting a "warmer" area to be in? As it's been said, I'll reiterate that in the intermountain west, that doesn't occur much. Best you could prob hope for is a banana belt type of area, that will still get a bunch of snow, or be really gray in winter, etc.

Are you OK with the cold? Or is it a no-go type of deal? If you and your fam can deal with it, you'll be fine. When you decide to move, try to hit as many of your "wants" as you can, but be willing to compromise in others. For me, the cold is one of those little compromises when moving to the mountains. But look on the brightside: it often keeps a lot of the rift-raft out.
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Old 07-31-2020, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
25,699 posts, read 17,144,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayne Cobb View Post
Mike, just wanted to say you have some of the best info on these threads I've seen. Really, ever seen. On any state. Well thought out and written.


The only thing I disagreed with on here is the assertion that C19 will be economically devastating for a long time. While it certainly could be, none of us has a crystal ball. Personally, I believe Trump will waive the similar magic wand that he did before to re-energize everything much sooner than any of us would think.


Heck, there are certain industries and metrics that are still doing mostly well that in most scenarios, and w/ any other President, should never be doing well.
I was referring to Covid's effect on Idaho. A recession always comes later to Idaho, sometimes much later, and then it lingers on longer here than in most other states.

It's always been mysterious to me as why that is, but the 1980 recession, which hit the rest of the country hard, didn't reach Idaho until the 3rd quarter of 1981, and then it stuck around to the 3rd quarter of 1989 before it finally lifted. That's generally they way they all go, though some are shorter and milder than others.

This one could sure be different, as the cause really isn't financial. If a vaccine comes quickly that allows us to return to our old closely crowded ways, I honestly think the nation could jump out of it within 18 months or so.

Ive very hopeful that a vaccine will be found. Advanced science is far more powerful than it was just 10 years ago, and I think it's quite possible a vaccine will be something as brand new in the way it works as the virus is.

We are resilient people, so no matter what happens, Idahoans will ride this out and get back to biz as soon as it's possible. This is a very rare instance that won't be repeated for a while.(I hope.)
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Old 08-02-2020, 07:04 PM
 
82 posts, read 56,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
Essentially, we all live where Idaho is habitable. Our center is mostly too mountainous to ever be inhabited, and where there are no mountains, there are inhabitable lava flows.
Well yet another thing I didn't know about Idaho ... Lava flows??? Who would have thought. Are any of them active?
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Old 08-02-2020, 07:28 PM
 
5,894 posts, read 5,479,218 times
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My understanding is that there were some lava eruptions / flows 2,000 - 15,000 years ago. The big lava fields apparently formed 0.5 - 1.5 million years ago. The remnant volcanoes and underlying systems may see future activity in coming thousands of years but the threat isn't considered high at this time.

Last edited by NW Crow; 08-02-2020 at 07:38 PM..
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Old 08-02-2020, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
25,699 posts, read 17,144,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrunik View Post
Well yet another thing I didn't know about Idaho ... Lava flows??? Who would have thought. Are any of them active?
No.
Humans were here in the last eruptions, though, as they occurred about 3,000 years ago.

Part of the flows are a National Monument.

https://www.nps.gov/crmo/index.htm

The First astronauts trained at the Craters in preparation for the moon landing.

The lava stretches all the way across that bottom of the state from east to west. Like Hawaii, the lava isn't everywhere in a layer; it flowed in fingers. So never reached a lot of places, while it covered others up.

U.S. 20 goes through some of the heaviest flows for about a 75 mile stretch of the highway.

Idaho is where a lot of the biggest geologic activity of the North American continent occurred. Our western border is where the 2 separate tectonic plates that form our present continent collided, which thrust the Teton range up like splinters stick up in a broken board. That's why the Tetons look so dramatic on the Wyoming side.

The Idaho side was the over-riding plate, so it has a long highland area that leads up to the Tetons. When the plates collided they brought the much older hot spot under them closer to the surface, which eventually cut its way upward and began erupting. The hot spot then traveled northeast and formed Yellowstone Park.

(Actually, the hot spot stayed in the same place, and the plates moved above it. but it's easier to visualize the other way around.)

Idaho is really geologically interesting; the northern end of the state was all glaciated in the last ice age, as was part of the center and the south, but the glacier walls ended in other parts of the state as well. The ice age floods formed many of our most extreme features. We have Hells' Canyon, which is deeper than the Grand Canyon, and the Snake River was the main drainage when Lake Bonneville, the great inland sea, drained after an earthquake opened up the mountains that kept it contained.

The Shoshone Falls are higher than Niagara, and they were formed from those waters. The flood was so massive the canyon was cut a mile deeper into the earth in only about 2 weeks.

We have one of the largest aquifers in the U.S.- the water all pools and flows through the lava underground, and comes from the snow melt of the Rocky Mountains. The Lost River actually becomes lost- it flows to a spot where it disappears, goes underground, and then comes out at 10,000 Springs in the wall of the Snake River Canyon about 100 miles away.

Volcanic soil is extremely rich. If this was a more temperate state, literally anything could grow here.

NID has typically poorer glaciated soil, except in the Palouse, where massive loess deposits formed. After the Earth warmed up after the last Ice Age, massive drought hit China and most of Asia.
Huge windstorms carried the loess dust all the way to Idaho, where the sky literally rained dirt that's over 9 feet thick in some places.

The dirt is all rich topsoil, the lightest soil, and it's even richer than volcanic soil. it made the Palouse a little agricultural gold mine surrounded by poorer, more rocky glaciated soil.

I began my interest in our geology in high school; I had a really good teacher who got me hooked on it. He wasn't here very long, as the Alaska oil strike lured him up there. He made a lot of money doing geological work for the pipeline.
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Old 08-02-2020, 10:19 PM
 
874 posts, read 320,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrunik View Post
Well yet another thing I didn't know about Idaho ... Lava flows??? Who would have thought. Are any of them active?
family and friends living near old lava flows and when visiting we visited one really nice one. It has a tunnel that was made and the controlled air flow allowed ice to form in the summer. Sonya Henne iced skated in the middle of a frozen lake in it long ago. They made a lot of money off the ice as it was the only way to have a cold beer in the Summer.


North of Twin Falls in the middle of the lava fields.
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Old 08-03-2020, 08:10 AM
 
82 posts, read 56,754 times
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Mike if you ever write a book on Idaho history, I'll be first to buy it! Great info as always.
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