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View Poll Results: WHICH of these towns would you choose to move to?
Coeur d’Alene 4 36.36%
Wallace 0 0%
Hailey 3 27.27%
A different town - if you choose this, name which town 4 36.36%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 11. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-27-2021, 11:32 PM
 
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First I want to thank ALL of you for helping me with my question:
volosong, MTJoe, banjomike, Clark Fork Fantast, nm9stheham, oldafretired, Cdarocks...instead of replying to each individually I will make comments below - hopefully this will work ok:

First let me say, your input has been REALLY helpful - and I appreciate the time you took to give me your feedback. I am leaving in one week on a road trip to Idaho to explore the entire state. I am trying to figure out the best area for me to move to. I know I mentioned 3 specific towns - and I didn't realize they were all polar opposites from one another when I listed them. I had read an article that made me want to inquire more about them: https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/idah...o-small-towns/

The article was entitled 10 most beautiful charming towns in Idaho. So how would I know the true differences? That's why I am posing the question to you locals. I definitely will have to rent for a while but as this is an exploratory road trip I am about to embark on, I need to make up my mind pretty quickly as to which place I will like the best. Because once I leave Idaho and head back east I want to pack up and leave and head back to ID knowing where I am going (which town).

I know No One in these places - I can put a pin on a map and tell the GPS to take me to Sandpoint or Bonner's Ferry or Featherville - but once I get to that pin point - now what? That is the issue - just driving around random streets (not sure where the 'town' or sights or anything is in a given town) is definitely a challenge so any feedback on how you would attempt this would be appreciated. I wish I had two more months to do more research to know these answers, but unfortunately I have to go in a week. So I am TOTALLY OPEN to your suggestions, it does NOT have to be one of the 3 towns at all....I will have about 2-4 weeks to make this trip, but need to do it economically.

So volosong suggested this area, which I would like to check out:
Coeur d'Alene area. Primarily because of the surrounding natural environment, the friendliness of the residents, and the respectful attitude of motorized vehicles toward bicyclists. If I were to move, and money was not a consideration, it would be to another city in this immediate area, (Dalton Gardens or the Avondale Lake neighborhood between the cities of Hayden and Hayden Lake.

Idaho is a very libertarian state. Not the political party, but in individual freedom and individual responsibility way. And many/most are fanatical about it. I LOVE TO HEAR THIS

About the only place with a 'hard and fast' rule is Costco. Either a mask or a face shield...or no entrance. Guess I won't be going to Costco!

I'm about 30 minutes north of CdA in Spirit Lake. Hardly anyone wears masks. And those that do are probably older people who might have health issues so they are being careful. I go to the local cafe at least once/week and I've only seen probably less than 10 people in total wearing masks since this craziness started. People are much more independent up here and don't have that communist/socialist collectivist attitude. Even at the large supermarket in Athol where I think I saw a sign at the entrance asking people to mask up, most of the customers don't don masks and even a lot of the employees are maskless.
I LOVE TO HEAR THIS!! YAY! So grateful people are not caving in to this tyrannical crap. So is Spirit Lake a town or an area? I would like to check it out - so what areas do you suggest? Is Athol a town in Spirit Lake? I definitely am interested!!!

Masks are mandated by the Panhandle Health district (basically the northern 4 counties) and I believe Post Falls and CDA both have city council mandates. Compliance is maybe 50/50 overall. More so in town, less so on the outskirts. Cross the border into WA and watch out though. Gov. Little is what I would call a concerned conservative. I suggest doing some reading about him to see how he aligns with your personal ideals. Local news sources: Krem.com KHQ.com/Spokesman Review (same owners) KXLY.com CDA Press Krem or KHQ Thanks for the info. on the masks - so I think I would prefer the outskirts - I will stay clear of WA! Thanks also for the news sources, great tips!

As for Idaho, you can either get lots of sunshine (South, East), or lots of trees, rivers, and lakes (North and Central). That's a little too schematic, but overall you have to decide what is more important to you. If you're just looking for a place to have a new set of experiences for a few years, I'd say you can take some chances based on a checklist and the opinions of strangers, but if you're looking for a permanent home you need to come up and breathe the air. (With or without a mask.) I am on my way to breathing that amazing Idaho air here in about 9-10 days - I can't wait! With No mask! That is a tricky one...I love trees, rivers, lakes and sun - I guess I can't have it all - I realize - I am looking for a permanent home. I am SO TIRED OF MOVING. I know Idaho will be the LAST state I reside until I die. I want a community - I need some roots - I feel like I have been moving so much - and now I just want a safe sanctuary somewhere that I can live in peace and hang on to a little bit of freedom (if there really is any left - but I will feel like I have more of that feeling in Idaho). That is why its vital I find someplace that has that community that is on the same page - in regards to what's going on (being 'woke' to the events and not a sleeping sheep like 97% of most Americans). I know that might be a hard order to find - but even if I can't find exactly that - at least Nice friendly people who still believe in community and are ok with welcoming in a newbie. I would like to find a place that is AFFORDABLE (I can skip the Sun Valley places!) - I love nature - love hiking - and hoping to find a house I can rent somewhere with trees/set back off a main road/little more rural if possible - maybe I am asking for too much? I don't know, but I need affordable.

I need to figure out the best strategy for seeing a place - rather than just inputing a town in a GPS and going there and not knowing what or where to go - where is the center of town? Where do people shop? etc. etc. If you have any ideas on how you would tackle this I am all ears.

Now tell me would you go to all of these places to scratch them off the list and know one way or another - or is this going to be too much to see/too overwhelming do you think? If you have any ideas on a route, would love to hear it. I was thinking of these towns (I know nothing about any of them):

1.)Preston
2.)Bruneau
3.)Featherville
4.)Hailey
5.)Ketchum
6.)Stanley
7.)McCall (long valley)
8.)Lewiston
9.)Moscow
10.)Post Falls
11.)Coeur D'Alene
12.)Weiser
13.)Payette
14.)Priest Lake
15.)Sandpoint and Boundary County
16.)Bonner's Ferry
17.)Hayden Lake
18.)Athol
19.)Spirit Lake

I read in a book I am using as a reference - that a good area would be snake river valley from Payette to Burley - I have no idea even where that is. Also interested (but not sure what towns this would encompass): Along Highways 75, 93, 28 on the east side of the snake river valley range, and Highways 56 and 95 on the west including the Bitterroot Valley of Hamilton Montana. Also good sites along Hwy 200 leading around the lake toward Clark Fork and beyond. Not quite sure its all mumbo jumbo reading that....anyways, my list of 3 places has expanded, and become a bit overwhelming. Anyways, I think it might be better to make the list smaller - do you agree?

Thank you for your help! If it takes me a few days to respond, its because I am packing for ID trip! I need your feedback, thank you. And yes, I do love the sun, but even if I get it a little I will be ok. The key for me would be lots of nature - lots of trees - I don't mind the snow - but want to grow vegetables (may have to do inside if the weather is bad?) - want to eventually (down the road) when I can own a place have chickens, etc. I would like to be more rural/remote - where my house is not sticking out like a sore thumb -I like farmers markets (if there are any)....

But initially need to find an affordable rental and if it could meet any of those specifications, all the better.....If you KNOW OF ANY person renting their house (its just me so I do not need a big place) but would prefer a house over an apt. or condo. Please let me know if you know of anything!!! Thank you again for your help! You all seem so nice - I really appreciate your help.

Last edited by mangococonut; 01-28-2021 at 12:04 AM..
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Old 01-28-2021, 01:28 AM
 
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Post Falls, CDA, Hayden Lake are all pretty much suburbs of each other and would constitute a "larger city" than the others I mention here. Easy to scope out in a full day. Throw in Rathdrum while you're at it.
Spirit Lake, Athol, Sandpoint, Bonners and Priest would be a long day and although all are small it would be easy to miss a key positive/negative trying to blow through them in a day due to travel distance. Also keep in mind it gets dark here by 5:00.

You mention "budget" often but don't specify what yours is. That's okay, maybe do some rental searches in those areas to get a feel for what it's going to cost. Post Falls, CDA and Hayden are likely to be the most expensive. If you can make do with the outlying towns then prices should be much better but you'll need to be more self-sufficient. CDA to Bonners takes about 1.5 hours. I believe you mentioned "work from home" so a daily commute is not an issue correct? Can you get by for 1-3 days without power also? Our recent storm did that to even the heavily populated areas.

The CDA area is a hotpoint right now for transplants. This drives up costs. Sandpoint would be #2 on that list but it is still an interesting mix of yuppie and redneck. Bonners/Priest have not had the same interest that I'm aware of. This would make them more affordable in comparison but they are also more isolated.

My suggestion, as it applies to Northern Idaho, is as follows.
-If you are healthy.
-If you do not need to commute every day.
-If you can be without power/water/etc for a day or 2 in an emergency...
Pull up a map with CDA to the south, Bonners to the north, Post Falls to the west and ....well nothing to the east (I'll cover this in a sec.). Look at every small town in that square and choose one of those. You'll have nearly the same topography in any one of them. Mountains and trees. CDA/PF/Rathdrum are more prairie but the mountains are literally minutes away. In fact everything is only about an hour's drive from everything else in North Idaho.
East of CDA puts you over the pass (4th of July). With your history of warmer climates I don't recommend anything east of there based on weather and limited sunshine due to the steeper mountains surrounding all those towns. Prices in Kingston/Wallace/Pinehurst/etc. are however significantly less than the other areas on your list. I'd leave those as "extended research once you live here".

Keep in mind that we are having a very mild winter this year. What you see while here is not indicative of typical snowfall. In fact we're headed back to the lower 40s later this week...that's not normal this time of year.

Anything more specific, feel free to ask.

Last edited by MTJoe; 01-28-2021 at 01:41 AM..
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Old 01-28-2021, 10:14 AM
 
891 posts, read 400,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mangococonut View Post
I need to figure out the best strategy for seeing a place - rather than just inputing a town in a GPS and going there and not knowing what or where to go - where is the center of town? Where do people shop? etc. etc. If you have any ideas on how you would tackle this I am all ears.

Now tell me would you go to all of these places to scratch them off the list and know one way or another - or is this going to be too much to see/too overwhelming do you think? If you have any ideas on a route, would love to hear it. I was thinking of these towns (I know nothing about any of them):

1.)Preston
2.)Bruneau
3.)Featherville
4.)Hailey
5.)Ketchum
6.)Stanley
7.)McCall (long valley)
8.)Lewiston
9.)Moscow
10.)Post Falls
11.)Coeur D'Alene
12.)Weiser
13.)Payette
14.)Priest Lake
15.)Sandpoint and Boundary County
16.)Bonner's Ferry
17.)Hayden Lake
18.)Athol
19.)Spirit Lake

I read in a book I am using as a reference - that a good area would be snake river valley from Payette to Burley - I have no idea even where that is. Also interested (but not sure what towns this would encompass): Along Highways 75, 93, 28 on the east side of the snake river valley range, and Highways 56 and 95 on the west including the Bitterroot Valley of Hamilton Montana. Also good sites along Hwy 200 leading around the lake toward Clark Fork and beyond. Not quite sure its all mumbo jumbo reading that....anyways, my list of 3 places has expanded, and become a bit overwhelming. Anyways, I think it might be better to make the list smaller - do you agree?

Thank you for your help! If it takes me a few days to respond, its because I am packing for ID trip! I need your feedback, thank you. And yes, I do love the sun, but even if I get it a little I will be ok. The key for me would be lots of nature - lots of trees - I don't mind the snow - but want to grow vegetables (may have to do inside if the weather is bad?) - want to eventually (down the road) when I can own a place have chickens, etc. I would like to be more rural/remote - where my house is not sticking out like a sore thumb -I like farmers markets (if there are any)....

But initially need to find an affordable rental and if it could meet any of those specifications, all the better.....If you KNOW OF ANY person renting their house (its just me so I do not need a big place) but would prefer a house over an apt. or condo. Please let me know if you know of anything!!! Thank you again for your help! You all seem so nice - I really appreciate your help.
Just a side note... I hang around this forum as people here ARE indeed nice. I am from the mtns of VA right now, but have been conducting a slow search of parts of ID, MT and WY for 3-4 years now, anticipating my nearing retirement. So I have been working this same process but very slowly. I like the sun and the trees, but have lived deep in a forest before, and tend favor the sun over the trees.



With all you need to learn, I'd like to suggest that you delay your trip for a few weeks if you can, and spend an intense amount of time looking at a few things on the internet for each area:
- Google satellite views of each town. This can give you some idea of the amount trees nearby, which seems to be very important to you. Plus it can give some comparative idea on size of the town, how settled the surrounding area is, and how mountainous it is. Now, if you are not good with maps, then this may not help, but I'd suggest you give it a try for a few towns and see if it helps. I learn a ton of stuff about each area form this simple exercise, coupled with real estate site views.

- Go on local websites and see what you can find for rentals for each town
- Go on the real estate sites and see what sizes and prices of houses there are. This can tell you a lot about the local economy. For example, McCall is going to show you more higher rpiced houses, since it is a vacation home area, and Ketchum is going to be reeeeeelly high priced for houses since it is a high end ski area.
- You can look up climate on this site (I perfer Sperlings) and see how many sunny days there are on average


After some practice, you can develop at least some basic filtering and ordering criteria for this long list of towns, and make up a chart with some info scribbled in for each of the above categories. But ultimately, I sense that you indeed need to 'lay eyes' on the area; I am the same way. I have been all over much of the area you list execept for No ID, for just that reason. (It is the winter sun thing for me...)



As for your trip, 1 week will be too much for this whole list to do much more than drive through and beep the horn LOL. Do you have a bit more time? I hate to suggest this, because you will miss the most dramatically scenic area on your list, but I would first knock off the Hailey/Ketchum/Stanley route. You wold reach it from the south via ID75, but once you get to Stanley, then you will probably go east to Challis, then Salmon, and then up into western MT on US93, then cut west at Missoula to northern ID via I-90. That is a loooong route. Or go up on the west side of ID and down the east side last, and then bypass the Hailey/Ketchum/Stanley section on the interstates if you are short of time.


And one more suggestion: Find a decent place to rent and then use that as your base for frequent weekend forays to each area of interest. There is no real 'central' town in ID; that is all wilderness. Somewhere between Boise and McCall seems to be the most central locale to your areas of interest for future driving forays.
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Old 01-28-2021, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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Hi, mangococonut...

That "most charming" list is tilted toward the mountain getaway side of Idaho's towns more than the daily life, bread and butter, making a living side.

I've visited or lived all over this state from top to bottom at one time or another, and I've never been to Stites or Featherville. Neither sound to me that they would be all that easy to live in, even if they're hell for scenic.
I've spent considerable time in Stanley, and it's not a place I would like to live in full-time year round. Most folks don't, and that's part of why it's so small.
The scenery surrounding Stanley is incredible, and as close to true wilderness as you'll find in the west, but nights often dip down to near-reezing in the middle of the summer, and winters there last for up to 9 months of the year.
2 solid weeks of -10º in the day can be a real drag.

Too small, too remote? Maybe. If I was in my 20s, in perfect health, immortal and bulletproof, either of those towns might be perfect for living in a hermitage or on the weekends, during vacations, holidays, or the like.
Living in them full-time would be another, different story. It would all depend on what I was doing to make a living, and how long I intended to do the work.
Nowadays, I wouldn't want to live in a tiny town at all. I'm too old, and age has restricted me too much.

Don't be so sure you will love it here; some folks do, and others don't. Folks move here thinking they crave isolation, but after tasting it for a few months, find they miss being around other people even more.

The air here is great, but not all the time.
Even though Idaho didn't burn last summer, all summer long we got the smoke from the fires in other states.
The smoke was so bad here I developed a serious case of chronic bronchitis by early last October. By Election Day, when I had a doctor's appointment, may lungs were so constricted the doc put me on supplemental oxygen.

It's great here until it isn't, and when it's not great, it's not always terrible. But when it's terrible, it can be really terrible. Idaho has many extremes.

I'm not trying to discourage you, but I'm not trying to encourage you either. I'm glad you are planning to come here during the winter to look things over; winters here can be discouraging for sure.

Just don't get yourself mentally over-committed to moving here just yet. This has never been a state for everyone, and Idaho tends to select her children as much as they select her.

Try to be objective when you're here and try not to allow the newness of this place to overwhelm you. I hope you have a good time and a very enjoyable stay!

After you've been here a while, you'll know much more than you know now.
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Old 01-28-2021, 02:37 PM
 
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MTJoe and nm9stheham THANK YOU SOOOOOO MUCH for your continued help -- I knew there was something special about Idahoans, they really are down to earth friendly helpful people (unlike many places I Have lived)! So thank you again....

Oh what I meant is that I am planning to leave for ID in one week (on 2/3) and it should take maybe 4 days to get there - and then I will have 2-4 weeks to explore! So hopefully in that time I will be able to see a lot. I appreciate that route idea, and the ideas to check out google satellite and real estate sites as well!

MTJoe - Pull up a map with CDA to the south, Bonners to the north, Post Falls to the west and ....well nothing to the east (I'll cover this in a sec.). Look at every small town in that square and choose one of those. You'll have nearly the same topography in any one of them. Mountains and trees. CDA/PF/Rathdrum are more prairie but the mountains are literally minutes away. In fact everything is only about an hour's drive from everything else in North Idaho.
East of CDA puts you over the pass (4th of July). With your history of warmer climates I don't recommend anything east of there based on weather and limited sunshine due to the steeper mountains surrounding all those towns. Prices in Kingston/Wallace/Pinehurst/etc. are however significantly less than the other areas on your list. I'd leave those as "extended research once you live here".
I will take all of those points into consideration. What did you mean 4th of July? Is the weather in Wallace that much colder than those on the west? You said, Can you get by for 1-3 days without power also? Our recent storm did that to even the heavily populated areas. Well I never have done that before in a cold area - so would you definitely need a generator - or what other options would you suggest?


The CDA area is a hotpoint right now for transplants. This drives up costs. Sandpoint would be #2 on that list but it is still an interesting mix of yuppie and redneck. Bonners/Priest have not had the same interest that I'm aware of. This would make them more affordable in comparison but they are also more isolated. Yes I don't want to be any where that transplants have driven up the cost - I am trying to keep things as affordable as possible! Is that Sandpoint area also pricey?

Is there any resource you all are using to compare the sunlight as I have not found it? Just to get a reference point if there is a big difference. Also with the year round temperature differences between areas...

Yes a lot I need to research in less than a week - I wish I could extend my research out further and leave in a month - but due to other circumstances need to go on 2/3. I GREATLY appreciate your continued help. Thank you!
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Old 01-28-2021, 02:42 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
739 posts, read 157,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nm9stheham View Post
...Google satellite views of each town.
Yeah, the larger towns will have google street view, so you can do a "virtual drive around" even before you leave. The smaller towns? Well, you might catch a glimpse from the main highway, or as nm9 says, you've got satellite view. Have a great trip!
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Old 01-28-2021, 02:44 PM
 
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When will they enact some growth restrictions? Summer in CDL to Spokane is too much traffic. People need to get organized, and let the politicians know that too much growth is not something they want.
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Old 01-28-2021, 03:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mangococonut View Post

Oh what I meant is that I am planning to leave for ID in one week (on 2/3) and it should take maybe 4 days to get there - and then I will have 2-4 weeks to explore! So hopefully in that time I will be able to see a lot. I appreciate that route idea, and the ideas to check out google satellite and real estate sites as well!


Is there any resource you all are using to compare the sunlight as I have not found it? Just to get a reference point if there is a big difference. Also with the year round temperature differences between areas...

Yes a lot I need to research in less than a week - I wish I could extend my research out further and leave in a month - but due to other circumstances need to go on 2/3. I GREATLY appreciate your continued help. Thank you!
OK, good I did not realize that you had 3-4 weeks to roam around ID. So that makes the pre-research time less critical. Getting eyes on these places will be pretty important, IMHO.


For the sunny days per year, you can google 'xyz city, ID, city data climate' and get the info form this site, but it AFAIK will not give you a direct total number of sunny days per year. (I will PM you another way that lists the sunny days per year very clearly, because if I post it here it will get cut as that site is perceived to be a competing site to city-data.)


OBTW, as for your route, if you go up through Hailey/Ketchum/Stanley, just be aware that ID21 west out of Stanley goes through what is known as 'avalanche alley' and if they get a coupla big avalanches there, it can be blocked for months. So you count on going east from Stanley on ID75 through Challis and on.


9 months of winter in Stanley? LOL define 'winter'..... Maybe 5-6 months typically. And -10F does not bother everyone.... I've been in Stanley at -40F to -20F for a week and went snowmobiling and snowshoeing. Living there is another matter, but some folks adapt. But you have to be prepared and pretty determined to deal with the cold and traveling distances. But Stanley is actually one of the 'least isolated' of the isolated spots IMHO, because they keep a good highway, ID75, south to Ketchum open for medical emergencies. Featherville would be a lot tougher simply due to the road in and out. But getting housing in Stanley is VERY tough, and you better have work already lined up. The availability of land is very restricted by the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. You probably cannot afford anything there, even moreso with the last 2 year's of price runup.
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Old 01-28-2021, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
25,681 posts, read 17,130,616 times
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Hi, mango...
Bear in mind that Idaho is almost 500 miles long and 300 miles wide.

This is mid-winter here, so the roads are going to be snowy/icy in spots and travel will be slow going. There is only one highway, a 2-lane, that traverses the state north and south, and most of it lies next to a river, so much of the drive is in canyon bottom, which also makes for a slow drive.

In winter, it could take as long as 20 hours to drive from Moscow south to Hailey. Preston is farther south and east of Hailey and could take another 2 1/2- 3 hours in the winter. Preston is the southernmost city in your list.

I suggest you study a map closely, and divide your trips. Half of your list is in the panhandle, which begins at Lewiston and ends at the Canadian border. That's an all-day drive.

Weiser, Payette and McCall are all closer to Boise and the Treasure Valley area, and from Boise, you can go to Stanley, Ketchum and Hailey. All are in the Wood River valley.

You have completely by-passed 3 of Idaho's largest cities and their surrounding areas; farther south from Wood River lies Twin Falls, and then, about 150 eastward, is Pocatello. Driving from Hailey to Preston would require going through Pocatello on your way.

North of Pocatello by 50 miles is Idaho Falls, the largest city in the SouthEast corridor, which stretches from Utah on the South to Montana on the north and is bordered by Wyoming on the east. This corridor lies along the west slope of the Rockies, including the west slope of the Tetons, which form Idaho's eastern border.

The corridor starts with Pocatello and ends at the Montana border in Island Park. This is a 150-mile stretch. Preston is about 50 miles S.E. of Pocatello in the Bear Lake area, and is closer to Salt Lake City.

The corridor is one of the 3 most populated regions in the state; the Panhandle, the Treasure Valley, and the SE Corridor are where all the state's major goods and services are, where the most people live, and where most of the city life abides. Each city has bunches of small surrounding villages, and they all have lots of surrounding wilderness that's very close by.

Considering the time of year, I wouldn't plan on trying to see everything on your list in under 3 weeks, and if the weather takes a bad turn, even more time than that.

I suggest breaking your trips up into 3 different regions, and plan on making more than one visit.

Make sure to thoroughly prepare your vehicle for winter travel, and plan on some 'down days' where there's nothing specific on your agenda. Try to make each visit leisurely enough that you can do some exploring from a comfortable center spot.
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Old 01-28-2021, 09:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mangococonut View Post
....[/i]... What did you mean 4th of July? Is the weather in Wallace that much colder than those on the west? You said, Can you get by for 1-3 days without power also? Our recent storm did that to even the heavily populated areas. Well I never have done that before in a cold area - so would you definitely need a generator - or what other options would you suggest?


4th of July is the mountain pass between CDA and Wallace/Kellog/Pinehurst etc. With your history being warmer climates I don't recommend moving to that side of the pass until you decide you (or anyone reading this) can handle winter driving here. All those towns are going to be much less expensive to live in but they are all in deep valleys. The Rathdrum/Post Falls prairie area will have direct sun for maybe another hour after Wallace has seen it go behind the mountains. You said sun was important. On sunny winter days it gets cold fast when the sun goes down.
A whole-house generator would be optimal but many get by on just a wood stove and candles. Your skills/needs will determine your comfort level in the event of a power outage. Isolated areas often get power restored later than the main corridors after a storm.


The CDA area is a hotpoint right now for transplants. This drives up costs. Sandpoint would be #2 on that list but it is still an interesting mix of yuppie and redneck. Bonners/Priest have not had the same interest that I'm aware of. This would make them more affordable in comparison but they are also more isolated. Yes I don't want to be any where that transplants have driven up the cost - I am trying to keep things as affordable as possible! Is that Sandpoint area also pricey?

-In 2020 Idaho was the #1 move-to state according to United Van Lines.
-Circa 2018 the CDA metro area was the 11th fasting growing metro area in the nation.
-Local news reports that there are 15-20 buyers for every home listed in the CDA/Post Falls area right now.
...the costs have already been driven up and I see no slowing in the near future. This is why I suggested looking at the "small" towns in that map range mentioned before. Sagle, Athol, Spirit Lake, Westmond, Bonners Ferry, Moyie Springs etc. All close to good amenities but far enough away from CDA that commuters aren't as willing to move there.You have an advantage over them.




...Yes a lot I need to research in less than a week -...


Agreed. We can type until we're blue in the face (fingers?) but ultimately you have to decide what will work for you.

Other things to consider:
-Does your "work-from-home" require high speed internet?
-What kind of car do you drive? Can you afford to buy a 4wd/AWD one?

All of my remarks apply to the northern area of Idaho. Others have commented on the southern portion. One exception is that somebody mentioned Idaho being 300 miles wide. That's southern Idaho. The Panhandle is only 50 miles across.
(Corrected my "quote response" for better understanding.)

Last edited by MTJoe; 01-28-2021 at 11:19 PM.. Reason: Can't spell good when I'm medicated. :)
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