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Unread 01-25-2010, 12:17 AM
 
Location: USA
527 posts, read 929,689 times
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Default Idaho vs Montana

Both of these states are beautiful but it seems that many people tend to pick Idaho over Montana for retirement and for general living and I was wondering why that is? Are jobs more readily available in Idaho vs Montana?
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Unread 01-25-2010, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Coeur d Alene, ID
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MT is a little more out of the way than ID is, and with that winters are a bit more harsh.
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Unread 01-25-2010, 02:50 PM
 
Location: FINALLY in N. Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaner View Post
MT is a little more out of the way than ID is, and with that winters are a bit more harsh.
I agree with that.. Also they seem to be a more proud of the land as far as price for the most part.. I've been to Montana several times in different locale's and me personally I think Idaho is prettier, and has more to offer someone who is thinking about retiring..

Just my opnion for what its worth..
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Unread 01-25-2010, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, ID
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Moving a family here...unless I put us right around Missoula or Kalispell, there wasn't nearly the variety of activities for my children as there are in the Sandpoint/CDA area. Kalispell is NOT an area I like (high plains isn't my preference, even with scenic views of gorgeous mountains), and while there are some areas not far from Missoula I liked, I preferred NID. If I could not live in NID, my second choice would have been the area off Hwy 200 about 20-40 miles outside Missoula.
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Unread 01-25-2010, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
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In Idaho...you can refer to Montana as one of those dang, liberal Eastern states .
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Unread 01-25-2010, 05:39 PM
 
Location: USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trace_Rinaldi View Post
I agree with that.. Also they seem to be a more proud of the land as far as price for the most part.. I've been to Montana several times in different locale's and me personally I think Idaho is prettier, and has more to offer someone who is thinking about retiring..

Just my opnion for what its worth..

That is interesting... I noticed that as well. Property is more expensive for reasons that do not logically make sense. I can understand why they have a heftier property tax (diverting lack of a sales tax on to property) but that should have no bearing on valuation which I think is high for what you get. I think jobs are more scarce than Idaho too but I can't be sure since I haven't taken a trip out to Montana nor have I attempted to do any business there.
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Unread 01-29-2010, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
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I have lived in both states. I'm an Idaho native, from Idaho Falls, but I moved to the Bozeman area twice.
The scenery is about equal in both states, but Montana has much more prairie. Most of Montana is prairie, but most of Idaho has mountains. Most of scenic Montana lies on the western edge of the state and is the communities in the scenic parts are more concentrated. Idaho has more mountains, and more small towns close to them.

Bozeman has a mountain chain on the edge of town, but so does Arco, Idaho. Arco doesn't have a nearby Interstate, and that makes all the difference. Property costs 4 times more in Boze than Arco. (but Arco is a very small town, so it lack a lot of other amenities.) By the same measure, living in Ceour D'Alene ID, next to a lake, is about the same as living in Poulsen MT next to an equally nice lake. Living in McCall, ID, next to a lake and a ski area, is about the same as living in Whitefish MT- same stuff, same high priced real estate, same inflated living costs on everything.

The super-rich spend about the same, and live the same, in Sun Valley, ID or Livingston, MT. Lotsa movie stars in either valley.

The difference for retired people can be large. Idaho has property and sales taxes, Montana has no sales tax. A new car costs less in Montana, with no tax added to the price, but buying a set of license plates for a new car costs up to $3,000, depending on how much the car was. The plates will cost close to that the following year, and only gradually come down as the car de-values. All property taxes are higher in Montana.
In Idaho, the sales tax will cost $3000 on the same car, but the plates will cost around $40, year after year. The difference is Idaho takes many small bites, Montana takes big bites less often.

In my experience, Montana weather is generally worse than Idaho's. Both go to extremes. There are few cultural differences. Montana generally has lower paying jobs than Idaho. Montana has a somewhat livelier art/writing/music scene going on statewide than Idaho.

Folks tend to move to Idaho and stay, and tend to move to Montana and leave in 2 years. This is mostly due to the cost of living, weather differences, and failed expectations of the newcomers. This is especially true in Bozeman, where tourists are very impressed at first glance, and there are more of them. They move because it's so beautiful, and aren't prepared for all the rest of it at all.
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Unread 01-29-2010, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Bigfoot Country
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
I have lived in both states. I'm an Idaho native, from Idaho Falls, but I moved to the Bozeman area twice.
The scenery is about equal in both states, but Montana has much more prairie. Most of Montana is prairie, but most of Idaho has mountains. Most of scenic Montana lies on the western edge of the state and is the communities in the scenic parts are more concentrated. Idaho has more mountains, and more small towns close to them.

Bozeman has a mountain chain on the edge of town, but so does Arco, Idaho. Arco doesn't have a nearby Interstate, and that makes all the difference. Property costs 4 times more in Boze than Arco. (but Arco is a very small town, so it lack a lot of other amenities.) By the same measure, living in Ceour D'Alene ID, next to a lake, is about the same as living in Poulsen MT next to an equally nice lake. Living in McCall, ID, next to a lake and a ski area, is about the same as living in Whitefish MT- same stuff, same high priced real estate, same inflated living costs on everything.

The super-rich spend about the same, and live the same, in Sun Valley, ID or Livingston, MT. Lotsa movie stars in either valley.

The difference for retired people can be large. Idaho has property and sales taxes, Montana has no sales tax. A new car costs less in Montana, with no tax added to the price, but buying a set of license plates for a new car costs up to $3,000, depending on how much the car was. The plates will cost close to that the following year, and only gradually come down as the car de-values. All property taxes are higher in Montana.
In Idaho, the sales tax will cost $3000 on the same car, but the plates will cost around $40, year after year. The difference is Idaho takes many small bites, Montana takes big bites less often.

In my experience, Montana weather is generally worse than Idaho's. Both go to extremes. There are few cultural differences. Montana generally has lower paying jobs than Idaho. Montana has a somewhat livelier art/writing/music scene going on statewide than Idaho.

Folks tend to move to Idaho and stay, and tend to move to Montana and leave in 2 years. This is mostly due to the cost of living, weather differences, and failed expectations of the newcomers. This is especially true in Bozeman, where tourists are very impressed at first glance, and there are more of them. They move because it's so beautiful, and aren't prepared for all the rest of it at all.
Great post banjomike! It really gave a nice perspective on the subtle differences.
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Unread 02-09-2010, 07:50 PM
 
10 posts, read 24,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toyman at Jewel Lake View Post
In Idaho...you can refer to Montana as one of those dang, liberal Eastern states .
[MOD CUT] I was very impressed with the Idaho political climate.

I'm going westbound Highway 12 to Lewiston, ID next August and looking forward to non -25f winters and piles of freaking snow, like east of the Divide.

Last edited by Sage of Sagle; 02-10-2010 at 12:15 AM.. Reason: Keep the political commentary out of this forum
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Unread 02-09-2010, 11:40 PM
 
3,184 posts, read 3,251,330 times
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Oh please--can we avoid political stereotypes plus the R-word on this thread?

In the 6 years we've been coming to NID, we've usually done roads trips to MT. When we were looking for property in 2007 and 2008, we actually hadn't yet decided whether to buy land in NID or WMT, but once I started looking online, and actually went seriously property-hunting in person, subtle differences became noticeable: NID's back roads seem better maintained; the small towns are somewhat closer in NID than in WMT, at least it feels that way; there are (were) many more properties available in NID than in WMT, at a more reasonable price, with more acreage; and I do believe there are more restaurants in NID than in WMT! All in all, I get the feeling that WMT is the ultimate, wild, and somewhat neglected outpost in a huge state, while NID is a vibrant, well-managed, much more intimate region, with easy access to an international airport (Spokane). And you still get the vastness and wildness of nature in NID, with spectacular views. But I have to say that I think it's wonderful to have the best of both states, with property in NID and WMT less than 5 miles away!
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