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Old 06-01-2011, 08:09 AM
 
14,307 posts, read 10,433,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Except that "ANY" law enforcement will not ask for it...
They would under the proper circumstances just like if you are Latino and it wouldn't be based on one's skin color or "look" either contrary to the pro-illegals claims.

 
Old 06-01-2011, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Tempe, Az
1,421 posts, read 1,160,536 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by olecapt View Post
Gosh I was lucky. My foreign born wife was never told any such thing and after 35 years in the USofA she became a citizen. But in the interim no one other than a border agent ever asked her.

than again Brits are that way. They demand that you persecute them a bit so they can feel...well...British...

And by the way if you believe that cooperating with the police is the right thing to do ... you are more British than American.

We threw the bastards out for that sort of behavior if you remember.
I got nothing to hide; do you? I aint afraid of the cops.
 
Old 06-01-2011, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 3,716,030 times
Reputation: 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagonut View Post
They would under the proper circumstances just like if you are Latino and it wouldn't be based on one's skin color or "look" either contrary to the pro-illegals claims.
Police do not ask immigration status on the street, generally any arrested detainee will go through processing from ICE when they are booked into jail if there is any questions about immigration status...
 
Old 06-01-2011, 10:20 AM
 
14,307 posts, read 10,433,593 times
Reputation: 2130
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Police do not ask immigration status on the street, generally any arrested detainee will go through processing from ICE when they are booked into jail if there is any questions about immigration status...
Where did I say that they did? Did you not see that I said "proper circumstances"?
 
Old 06-01-2011, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
1,648 posts, read 1,384,314 times
Reputation: 3168
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
No dog in this hunt but I believe you're being diliberately obtuse. The poster is merely implying that "regardless of what an overwhelming majority of American citizens wish for or feel prudent; legislaters are governed by other concerns such as lobby groups or constituents that perhaps rely on illegal labour to maximize shareholder profits. He is saying as a comparator that he will be able to fly to the moon and sing like Aretha before legislaters will take their heads out of their butts and deal with the issue of illegal immigration.

My sincere apologies to the poster "Bandon" if I have overstepped the boundaries in attempting to quell this obfuscation nonsense from 1751texan. Your point was perfectly clear to myself and I suspect anyone else without an 'agenda'.
I understand perfectly, Brusan. And thanks
 
Old 06-01-2011, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
1,648 posts, read 1,384,314 times
Reputation: 3168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyanna View Post
My husband is a British immigrant to this country, LEGALLY, and when he was granted legal permanent residency status he had to agree to ALWAYS carry proof of his right to live and work in this country. He also had to agree to PRODUCE that evidence if it is requested by ANY law enforcement officer. My British daughter-in-law is expected to follow these same rules. They aren't complaining about it! If I am stopped by law enforcement I expect that I will be asked to produce identification. I have no qualms about providing it. I grew up expecting to follow this as a matter of course. If a crime is committed in my neighborhood by a WHITE woman who fits my same general description I would expect the police to question me, because I fit the PROFILE. I have no problem with cooperating with the police.

The science of profiling has been highly successful in catching the perpetrators of crime, particularly murder, rape and serial killings.

You are one of the lucky ones. I too was married in 05 to a British Man in England. TMALSS, we went through all the correct channels for him to emigrate here. He was promised a work authorization (he was a comp programmer. A brilliant one) within 3 months of his arriving here. We waited and waited, kept getting runarounds and such...months went by, and one day he passed away suddenly from a heart attack. If he had been given his work authorization he most likely would have had the medical insurance/preventative care he needed and maybe he would still be here.

I'll always wonder if he had been Mexican, the borg that work for immigration would have done things a little differently (IE been more competent and truthful). I'll never know the answer to these questions and truthfully my experience has caused me a lot of unresolved anger and resentment/bitterness towards TPTB and illegals themselves. Whether it's right or not to feel this way, I am a woman who has lost the absolute love of her life and it's probably becuase of those people.
 
Old 06-01-2011, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
1,648 posts, read 1,384,314 times
Reputation: 3168
Quote:
Originally Posted by ErikCortez View Post
I got nothing to hide; do you? I aint afraid of the cops.
Your culture is much more acqueiscent and blindly obedient to the Man though then we fiesty Americans are,
Or at least USED to be.

Questioning authority and the WHY of things is just in our native natures. And that's one of the reasons I believe TPTB want illegals here, in fact the more the merrier to them. All you have to do is ask yourself who it benefits ? Well, it for sure doesn't benefits the masses who are losing good paying jobs to these invaders, but I could see how it would benefit the small elite 3% who just LOVE the nonquestioning culture who are so eager to obey. They want a dumbed down America, I don't understand how everyone cannot see this.
 
Old 06-01-2011, 02:35 PM
 
Location: NW Las Vegas - Lone Mountain
15,756 posts, read 30,914,440 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandon View Post
You are one of the lucky ones. I too was married in 05 to a British Man in England. TMALSS, we went through all the correct channels for him to emigrate here. He was promised a work authorization (he was a comp programmer. A brilliant one) within 3 months of his arriving here. We waited and waited, kept getting runarounds and such...months went by, and one day he passed away suddenly from a heart attack. If he had been given his work authorization he most likely would have had the medical insurance/preventative care he needed and maybe he would still be here.

I'll always wonder if he had been Mexican, the borg that work for immigration would have done things a little differently (IE been more competent and truthful). I'll never know the answer to these questions and truthfully my experience has caused me a lot of unresolved anger and resentment/bitterness towards TPTB and illegals themselves. Whether it's right or not to feel this way, I am a woman who has lost the absolute love of her life and it's probably becuase of those people.
YOu are mostly a victim of 9/11. The entire legal immigration system has become unresponsive and difficult since that event. There are now huge delays in many circumstances...multi years to get a green card even after having passed all the hurdles. I believe they are even inventing new terminology to define these people trapped in the twilight zone.
 
Old 06-01-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 3,716,030 times
Reputation: 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandon View Post
...He was promised a work authorization (he was a comp programmer. A brilliant one) within 3 months of his arriving here. We waited and waited, kept getting runarounds and such...months went by, and one day he passed away suddenly from a heart attack. If he had been given his work authorization he most likely would have had the medical insurance/preventative care he needed and maybe he would still be here...
The I-765 (for a "non-immigrant" to apply for work authorization) is one of the few immigration petitions that has to acted on by USCIS in a timely manner, in this case, 90 days. Do you have your notices from USCIS saying when the petition was received and any action on it? Was a response given back within that 90-day period to say if it was rejected or not?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandon View Post
...I'll always wonder if he had been Mexican, the borg that work for immigration would have done things a little differently (IE been more competent and truthful). I'll never know the answer to these questions and truthfully my experience has caused me a lot of unresolved anger and resentment/bitterness towards TPTB and illegals themselves. Whether it's right or not to feel this way, I am a woman who has lost the absolute love of her life and it's probably becuase of those people.
We can compare notes then. My (Mexican) wife and I also married in 2005 (outside of the United States). In 2007, she was admitted under a K-3 non-immigrant visa, probably very similar to your husband's path. Immediately we sent in an I-765 that was rejected right at the 88th day mark.

A month after the petition was mailed USCIS changed the "drop-box" location. Our petition was not forwarded through to the new location, but of course the petition fee was routed correctly to be cashed. We were told that since we filed to the "wrong address" the petition was denied.

We could refile to the "correct address" with a new petition fee if we wanted. Instead I decided to wait out until my wife was able to get her residency for work authorization, and we bore through her not being able to be employed in the United States. Our experience showed what I had heard, that USCIS would "easy out" of the I-765's right before the end of the 90 day period (if they were still awaiting review, getting close to the 90 days would cause them to be rejected without a further look).

From that "Mexican" perspective we also had trouble, so I don't know what to tell you other that I am sorry for your loss...

Please don't hate me or my wife, she is the love of my life too...

Last edited by IBMMuseum; 06-01-2011 at 02:59 PM..
 
Old 06-01-2011, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 3,716,030 times
Reputation: 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by olecapt View Post
YOu are mostly a victim of 9/11. The entire legal immigration system has become unresponsive and difficult since that event. There are now huge delays in many circumstances...multi years to get a green card even after having passed all the hurdles. I believe they are even inventing new terminology to define these people trapped in the twilight zone.
Agreed, some areas like the LIFE Act had just got out many of the kinks right before 9/11, and the gains were scrubbed away in an instant. Specifically to 9/11, I had an eighteen-month advance notice for a fifth military deployment to the Persian Gulf region, and USCIS managed to delay longer than that. We tried involving both of my Senators and had letterhead sent in from my Commander.

I certainly felt for much of the time that I was in the Twilight Zone...

Last edited by IBMMuseum; 06-01-2011 at 03:08 PM..
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