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View Poll Results: Dis Nafta and American agribuisiness force millions of mexican farmers out of work?
No 7 36.84%
Yes 10 52.63%
Not sure 2 10.53%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-04-2011, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Beverly, Mass
940 posts, read 1,566,793 times
Reputation: 539

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Since NAFTA was signed into law in 1993, illegal immigration in the U.S. has increased threefold to 12 million from 3.9 million in 1993. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, 57 percent of those entering the country illegally are from Mexico.

"Those displaced workers are largely the result of U.S. corn exports to Mexico. Heavily subsidized American Agribusiness not only put hundreds of thousands of American family farms out of business, but also dumped billions of dollars worth of American agricultural products into the Mexican market, putting millions of peasant farmers out of business. Between 1994 and 2001, the flood of cheap, subsidized American corn caused the price of the crop to fall 70 percent in Mexico. The drop in prices caused millions of farm jobs to disappear, with the numbers falling from 8.1 million in 1993 to 6.8 million in 2002.
Those out-of-work farmers make up the bulk of the illegal immigrants entering the U.S. each year. Unable to compete with their highly subsidized American competitors - $10 billion in 2000 alone - rural Mexican farmers have increasingly sought employment in the U.S."


Illegal Immigration and NAFTA | Economy In Crisis


"Mexican Farm Income: NAFTA-required changes have resulted in literally millions of Mexican peasant farmers leaving their small farms and their livelihoods and being forced to migrate. The land redistribution program established in the Mexican Constitution at the time of the Mexican Revolution was changed to meet NAFTA's foreign investor protection requirements-- meaning that, for the first time in 80, years small farmers could lose their land to bad debt. Projections range up to 15 million displaced Mexican small farmers because of NAFTA's agriculture provisions. At the start of NAFTA, more than one quarter of Mexican workers were employed in agricultural production. While overall population growth in Mexico over the past decade was 20%, rural population growth is now 6% while urban population growth is 44%, showing a trend of displaced farmers migrating to Mexico's cities, where unemployment rates are high, or to the north."

http://www.citizen.org/publications/...ct.cfm?ID=6788

Last edited by konfetka; 12-04-2011 at 07:54 PM..
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Old 12-04-2011, 07:45 PM
 
14,307 posts, read 11,146,155 times
Reputation: 2130
Quote:
Originally Posted by konfetka View Post
Since NAFTA was signed into law in 1993, illegal immigrantion in the U.S. has increased threefold to 12 million from 3.9 million in 1993. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, 57 percent of those entering the country illegally are from Mexico.

"Those displaced workers are largely the result of U.S. corn exports to Mexico. Heavily subsidized American Agribusiness not only put hundreds of thousands of American family farms out of business, but also dumped billions of dollars worth of American agricultural products into the Mexican market, putting millions of peasant farmers out of business. Between 1994 and 2001, the flood of cheap, subsidized American corn caused the price of the crop to fall 70 percent in Mexico. The drop in prices caused millions of farm jobs to disappear, with the numbers falling from 8.1 million in 1993 to 6.8 million in 2002.
Those out-of-work farmers make up the bulk of the illegal immigrants entering the U.S. each year. Unable to compete with their highly subsidized American competitors - $10 billion in 2000 alone - rural Mexican farmers have increasingly sought employment in the U.S."


Illegal Immigration and NAFTA | Economy In Crisis
Yeah well, these peasant farmers from Mexico sure aren't picking crops in our country since only 3% of illegals are doing so in this country. 97% of them are doing jobs that most Americans will do.
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Old 12-04-2011, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Beverly, Mass
940 posts, read 1,566,793 times
Reputation: 539
I think the costs of illegal immigration we are paying now, are just logical consequences of our aggresive trade policies, which we have benefited from earlier.

"The Bush administration has sought to control immigration at the border, but that's virtually impossible," said Harley Shaiken, director of UC Berkeley's Center for Latin American Studies. "The beginnings of immigration are in the displacement of farmers in Mexico."

Mexico's corn farmers see their livelihoods wither away / Cheap U.S. produce pushes down prices under free-trade pact - SFGate
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Old 12-05-2011, 07:40 AM
 
14,307 posts, read 11,146,155 times
Reputation: 2130
Quote:
Originally Posted by konfetka View Post
I think the costs of illegal immigration we are paying now, are just logical consequences of our aggresive trade policies, which we have benefited from earlier.

"The Bush administration has sought to control immigration at the border, but that's virtually impossible," said Harley Shaiken, director of UC Berkeley's Center for Latin American Studies. "The beginnings of immigration are in the displacement of farmers in Mexico."

Mexico's corn farmers see their livelihoods wither away / Cheap U.S. produce pushes down prices under free-trade pact - SFGate
Yeah, blame it all on NAFTA, lol. If memory serves me right the consenting countries all signed the dotted line and that includes Mexico. They should petition their own governments if it is impacting them negatively. The answer isn't to come here in violation of our immigration laws as "we" the American people are being negatively impacted and we had no say in NAFTA. Most of these illegals are farming here in our country. They are taking other American jobs that once paid a liveable wage.
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Old 12-05-2011, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,809,199 times
Reputation: 3028
Quote:
Originally Posted by konfetka View Post
Since NAFTA was signed into law in 1993, illegal immigration in the U.S. has increased threefold to 12 million from 3.9 million in 1993. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, 57 percent of those entering the country illegally are from Mexico.

"Those displaced workers are largely the result of U.S. corn exports to Mexico. Heavily subsidized American Agribusiness not only put hundreds of thousands of American family farms out of business, but also dumped billions of dollars worth of American agricultural products into the Mexican market, putting millions of peasant farmers out of business. Between 1994 and 2001, the flood of cheap, subsidized American corn caused the price of the crop to fall 70 percent in Mexico. The drop in prices caused millions of farm jobs to disappear, with the numbers falling from 8.1 million in 1993 to 6.8 million in 2002.
Those out-of-work farmers make up the bulk of the illegal immigrants entering the U.S. each year. Unable to compete with their highly subsidized American competitors - $10 billion in 2000 alone - rural Mexican farmers have increasingly sought employment in the U.S."


Illegal Immigration and NAFTA | Economy In Crisis


"Mexican Farm Income: NAFTA-required changes have resulted in literally millions of Mexican peasant farmers leaving their small farms and their livelihoods and being forced to migrate. The land redistribution program established in the Mexican Constitution at the time of the Mexican Revolution was changed to meet NAFTA's foreign investor protection requirements-- meaning that, for the first time in 80, years small farmers could lose their land to bad debt. Projections range up to 15 million displaced Mexican small farmers because of NAFTA's agriculture provisions. At the start of NAFTA, more than one quarter of Mexican workers were employed in agricultural production. While overall population growth in Mexico over the past decade was 20%, rural population growth is now 6% while urban population growth is 44%, showing a trend of displaced farmers migrating to Mexico's cities, where unemployment rates are high, or to the north."

Public Citizen
I don't think we need to shed too many tears for Mexico. . .

Quote:
(Reuters) - Mexico's economy is the world's 11th largest by World Bank estimates and total output is expected to grow by roughly 4 percent this year after a 5.5 percent expansion in 2010.
Mexico's economy and risks | Reuters

Quote:
Mexico's trade regime is built upon 13 trade agreements with 44 countries, including the United States, Canada, and the European Union. In 2010 it exported nearly $300 billion of goods, led by electronic and other machinery (38% of total), road vehicles and transportation equipment (17.8%), and mining and crude oil (14.6%). Mexico relies heavily on supplying the U.S. market but has also sought to diversify its export destinations. Eighty percent of Mexico’s exports went to the United States in 2010, down from a high of nearly 90% in 2001.
Quote:
Mexico’s agricultural sector accounts for 5% of GDP and employs 13.7% of the work force. Top revenue-producing crops include corn, tomatoes, sugar cane, dry beans, and avocados. Mexico also generates significant revenue from the production of beef, poultry, pork, and dairy products. Implementation of NAFTA has opened Mexico's agricultural sector to the forces of globalization and competition, and some farmers have greatly benefited from greater market access. In particular, fruit and vegetable exports from Mexico have increased dramatically in recent years. However, structural inefficiencies that have existed for decades continue to limit improvements in productivity and living standards for many in the agricultural sector.
Mexico

Quote:
The Mexican Government encouraged only crops like corn and beans until the year 1990 by restricting the import of these crops from other nations by implying certain acts. After that, the Mexico Agriculture though has decreased in percentage of Gross domestic product but as a whole it has increased in a remarkable way. There are many products that are produced by the Mexico Agriculture are among the top three ranks it terms of production in the world. Some of them are:

Mexico is ranked one in producing things like Onions and Chayote, Avocados, Lemons and Limes and the seed of Safflower.

Mexico is ranked second for producing things like Papaya, Dry fruits, chillies and peppers and some other things as well.

Mexico is considered third in producing things like oranges, mangoes, chicken meat, whole beans ,Asparagus and some other things.
Mexico Agriculture | Economy Watch

Quote:
Mexican exports to the United States reached over US$138 billion, while Mexican exports to Canada grew from US$2.7 billion to US$8.7 billion, an increase of almost 227%.
NAFTA: A Decade of Success | Office of the United States Trade Representative


In reality, Mexico has managed to have at least 10% of its citizens leave the country for a "better life" in the United States, of which many are here illegally and being supported by U.S. taxpayers; receives billions per month in remittances back from its citizens; in addition to exporting billions in agriculture to this country. That sounds like a pretty good deal for Mexico.
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Beverly, Mass
940 posts, read 1,566,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
I don't think we need to shed too many tears for Mexico. . .

Mexico's economy and risks | Reuters




Mexico


Mexico Agriculture | Economy Watch

NAFTA: A Decade of Success | Office of the United States Trade Representative


In reality, Mexico has managed to have at least 10% of its citizens leave the country for a "better life" in the United States, of which many are here illegally and being supported by U.S. taxpayers; receives billions per month in remittances back from its citizens; in addition to exporting billions in agriculture to this country. That sounds like a pretty good deal for Mexico.
If Mexican economy is doing so great, than why don't you see hordes of Americans lining up to move there for a better life?
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:20 PM
 
14,307 posts, read 11,146,155 times
Reputation: 2130
Quote:
Originally Posted by konfetka View Post
If Mexican economy is doing so great, than why don't you see hordes of Americans lining up to move there for a better life?
Because unlike Mexicans we love our country and wouldn't dream of deserting it in bad times. We will fight for our rights. We'd have a better life here and did so before the arrival of millions of illegal aliens.

Why would we move to a country that is not of our culture and their language isn't English?
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Old 12-05-2011, 03:22 PM
 
Location: San Diego
32,799 posts, read 30,034,103 times
Reputation: 17687
Quote:
Originally Posted by konfetka View Post
If Mexican economy is doing so great, than why don't you see hordes of Americans lining up to move there for a better life?
I'll take, "Drug Cartels" for 100 and the win.
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Old 12-05-2011, 08:04 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,699,632 times
Reputation: 22158
Quote:
Originally Posted by konfetka View Post
If Mexican economy is doing so great, than why don't you see hordes of Americans lining up to move there for a better life?
Well for one, Mexico is a nation that has immigration laws and protects it's jobs for it's people. There would be some consequences for an American caught working their illegally.
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Old 12-06-2011, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,809,199 times
Reputation: 3028
Quote:
Originally Posted by konfetka View Post
If Mexican economy is doing so great, than why don't you see hordes of Americans lining up to move there for a better life?
Are you refuting the info I posted? Is Mexico not ranked 11th, not a top producer/exporter of agriculture, and not enjoying a thriving middle class?

Do you see hordes of Americans lining up to move to Canada, which has a better economy than Mexico, as well as being a majority English-speaking country? No, you do not.

Why don't you explain why Mexicans refuse to remain in their own country, which enjoys a lower unemployment rate than the U.S., has a thriving middle class, quality education, beautiful scenery, delicious food, the list goes on. . . .

Oh, that's right, in Mexico they can't become high school dropouts and teen parents, and then rely on taxpayers to support their families.
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