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Old 01-09-2012, 11:19 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 2,387,732 times
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He can't legally immigrate to Canada either. Shall we bash the Canadians over it?

Immigrating to Canada

 
Old 01-09-2012, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Pa
20,310 posts, read 18,900,571 times
Reputation: 6517
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Really, your wife or mine has to say something more that they are married to us?...
Not at all. They get their VISA because we are assuming the R for them. In other words we have demonstrated the financial ability to take care of them and are willing to provide for them. It lower the risk of our nation having to foot the bill.
The non-sponsored immigrant should need to demonstrate that they will also have the means to support themselves and not become a burden upon our country.
Apply for an immigration VISA to another country. What do they require? Most will not accept a marriage sponsor as enough. The immigrant must demonstrate that they have the finances and or income to support living in the new country.
That is not an unreasonable expectation.
 
Old 01-09-2012, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Pa
20,310 posts, read 18,900,571 times
Reputation: 6517
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Most of the two-thirds legally immigrating each year are not under any quotas (spouses, minor children, and parents of U.S. citizens), but you would delay/exclude those doing it the correct way? Even doctors or nurses (one-fourth of doctors in the United States are foreign-born, and one-third of the nurses)? My legally immigrating Mexican wife and stepchildren thank you that others like them, even in instances that they are related to U.S. servicemembers (like I was), would not be allowed to come here because you are inconvenienced to think there is too many Mexicans already.
I have to agree with you. It is flat out wrong to punish those who follow the rules because some have broken the rules. Your wife and step children should be welcomed with open arms. For what its worth I welcome them.
 
Old 01-09-2012, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,015,841 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eleanora1 View Post
He can't legally immigrate to Canada either. Shall we bash the Canadians over it?

Immigrating to Canada
A Provence could want a Mexican food restaurant, and bring him in...
 
Old 01-09-2012, 12:08 PM
 
14,307 posts, read 11,158,884 times
Reputation: 2130
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Most of the two-thirds legally immigrating each year are not under any quotas (spouses, minor children, and parents of U.S. citizens), but you would delay/exclude those doing it the correct way? Even doctors or nurses (one-fourth of doctors in the United States are foreign-born, and one-third of the nurses)? My legally immigrating Mexican wife and stepchildren thank you that others like them, even in instances that they are related to U.S. servicemembers (like I was), would not be allowed to come here because you are inconvenienced to think there is too many Mexicans already.
Our government should have made it clear from the get-go that we are going to consider diversity first as our criteria rather than allowing in so many from one ethnic/national group just because they married an American. If their spouse doesn't make the cut then if they truly love each other they should reside in the foreign born spouses country. I would also exclude extended family members such as aunts, uncles, cousins and parents of the foreign born spouse. I can't think of many scenarios where an American citizen's parents and siblings are foreign born and waiting to come here unless the parents were/are here illegally in the first place.

Ok, let the flames begin.
 
Old 01-09-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,199,101 times
Reputation: 757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquid Reigns View Post
That's just it, the OP only says he has been working at a restaurant, doesn't say how long, doesn't really give any info other than that the person is oneself. Based on my HS diploma and field of work, even though right now I could be working at McDonald's, I could apply for and obtain a TN or even try to get an H1B, H2A, etc.
For argument's sake, let's say that you have worked at the restaurant for five years, and can get a good recommendation from your employer.

You go to the same consulate where you got your visitor's B-2 visa and ask about the TN visa. They tell you that you can't apply for a TN with only a high school education. Only very specific fields that require at least a bachelor's can qualify you.

Then you ask about the H1-B. The consular official tells you that you also need at least a bachelor's. You discover that it is even harder to get than the TN visa because the employer needs to pay the Department of Labor to prove that they are providing a competitive wage, in addition to having a yearly quota.

Then you ask about the H2-A, which is for agricultural workers. It looks like you qualify! Only it is NOT an immigrant visa and it will not allow you to stay in the U.S. after you finish your temp job.

So now what do you do? You still want to immigrate to the U.S. LEGALLY.

Quote:
I think we should scrap family visas all together, limit it to wife or child only and turn the other visas into visas anybody can attain which meet certain requirements, which could be age classifications, education levels, etc.
Until that happens, what should you as an experienced Mexican restaurant waiter do if you want to immigrate to the U.S.? Remember: You've never committed a crime or done drugs, you have no communicable diseases, you want to combat the stereotype of Mexicans all coming illegally, by coming legally. You are willing to wait however many years are necessary and fill out the required paperwork.
 
Old 01-09-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: California
2,477 posts, read 1,714,115 times
Reputation: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
For argument's sake, let's say that you have worked at the restaurant for five years, and can get a good recommendation from your employer.

You go to the same consulate where you got your visitor's B-2 visa and ask about the TN visa. They tell you that you can't apply for a TN with only a high school education. Only very specific fields that require at least a bachelor's can qualify you.

Then you ask about the H1-B. The consular official tells you that you also need at least a bachelor's. You discover that it is even harder to get than the TN visa because the employer needs to pay the Department of Labor to prove that they are providing a competitive wage, in addition to having a yearly quota.

Then you ask about the H2-A, which is for agricultural workers. It looks like you qualify! Only it is NOT an immigrant visa and it will not allow you to stay in the U.S. after you finish your temp job.

So now what do you do? You still want to immigrate to the U.S. LEGALLY.



Until that happens, what should you as an experienced Mexican restaurant waiter do if you want to immigrate to the U.S.? Remember: You've never committed a crime or done drugs, you have no communicable diseases, you want to combat the stereotype of Mexicans all coming illegally, by coming legally. You are willing to wait however many years are necessary and fill out the required paperwork.
Your now changing the parameters of your initial argument, and nullifying visas based on incorrect info.

The TN Visa doesn't require a BS and will work with simply having a HS Diploma.

The H1B doesn't require a degree either for the 65,000 cap. (since I work in a restaurant, I could be a very good cook, for which I could claim to be a chef, thus proving the equivalent of a BS)

All 3 visas, even though they are non-immigrant, can apply for and receive a change of status while here. The H1B is known as a "dual intent" visa and is probably the easiest to receive CoS with.
 
Old 01-09-2012, 12:42 PM
 
14,307 posts, read 11,158,884 times
Reputation: 2130
Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
For argument's sake, let's say that you have worked at the restaurant for five years, and can get a good recommendation from your employer.

You go to the same consulate where you got your visitor's B-2 visa and ask about the TN visa. They tell you that you can't apply for a TN with only a high school education. Only very specific fields that require at least a bachelor's can qualify you.

Then you ask about the H1-B. The consular official tells you that you also need at least a bachelor's. You discover that it is even harder to get than the TN visa because the employer needs to pay the Department of Labor to prove that they are providing a competitive wage, in addition to having a yearly quota.

Then you ask about the H2-A, which is for agricultural workers. It looks like you qualify! Only it is NOT an immigrant visa and it will not allow you to stay in the U.S. after you finish your temp job.

So now what do you do? You still want to immigrate to the U.S. LEGALLY.



Until that happens, what should you as an experienced Mexican restaurant waiter do if you want to immigrate to the U.S.? Remember: You've never committed a crime or done drugs, you have no communicable diseases, you want to combat the stereotype of Mexicans all coming illegally, by coming legally. You are willing to wait however many years are necessary and fill out the required paperwork.
Then you just remain in your homeland. This isn't rocket science, you know. It is no different than one wanting to buy an expensive home but they get turned down for a mortage because they can't make the income criteria to qualify or lack the 20% down payment. People want a lot of things but if they can't have them then they just have to accept that fact.
 
Old 01-09-2012, 12:51 PM
 
3,204 posts, read 2,385,544 times
Reputation: 1544
Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
For argument's sake, let's say that you have worked at the restaurant for five years, and can get a good recommendation from your employer.

You go to the same consulate where you got your visitor's B-2 visa and ask about the TN visa. They tell you that you can't apply for a TN with only a high school education. Only very specific fields that require at least a bachelor's can qualify you.

Then you ask about the H1-B. The consular official tells you that you also need at least a bachelor's. You discover that it is even harder to get than the TN visa because the employer needs to pay the Department of Labor to prove that they are providing a competitive wage, in addition to having a yearly quota.

Then you ask about the H2-A, which is for agricultural workers. It looks like you qualify! Only it is NOT an immigrant visa and it will not allow you to stay in the U.S. after you finish your temp job.

So now what do you do? You still want to immigrate to the U.S. LEGALLY.



Until that happens, what should you as an experienced Mexican restaurant waiter do if you want to immigrate to the U.S.? Remember: You've never committed a crime or done drugs, you have no communicable diseases, you want to combat the stereotype of Mexicans all coming illegally, by coming legally. You are willing to wait however many years are necessary and fill out the required paperwork.

Maybe you should enroll in a university in Mexico and acquire job skills that are more in demand in the US while you are waiting. That way if coming to the US doesn't work out, it still benefits you in the end.

A friend of mine had his heart set on going to Harvard. He felt if he graduated from a prestigous university he would be able to provide a better lifestyle for his family. After going through the usual process he found it just wasn't feasible. He attended college in the state and realized just because we want something doesn't make it happen. So you utilize the options you have to their best potential.
 
Old 01-09-2012, 01:01 PM
 
Location: California
2,477 posts, read 1,714,115 times
Reputation: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isitmeorarethingsnuts? View Post
Maybe you should enroll in a university in Mexico and acquire job skills that are more in demand in the US while you are waiting. That way if coming to the US doesn't work out, it still benefits you in the end.
Excellent advice! Especially since the immigrant doesn't mind waiting some time as described by usuario.
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