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Old 09-24-2007, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,148 posts, read 36,696,242 times
Reputation: 3785

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Bear with me here while I put thoughts to ions:

Many years ago there were large houses built in the cities; I am referring in particular to prior to WW II when we had large amounts of immigration from Europe, etc.

Once the flow of immigrants (legal and otherwise) was pinched off; it seemed that many of those 'grand old homes' quickly fell into disrepair due to the owners either having to pay market wages for gardeners, etc. or attempt to maintain their edifices themselves.

Fast forward to the last 10 years or so: does anybody see a parallel between the 'McMansions' and the large numbers of illegal immigrants today?

It would not surprise me to see many of those oversized homes wind up either in ruins or at least sectioned into apartments (assuming it would be tolerated under zoning ordinances) once the illegals are removed.

Something to ponder here.

Moderators; if this thread is in the wrong forum, please move it as you see fit
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Old 09-24-2007, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,757 posts, read 23,272,892 times
Reputation: 6092
I don't see the parallel between immigration and McMansions, however I do think that we have overbuilt large homes (everybody can define that as they choose). I think that the low interest rates kicked off this construction boom, and the odd financing that was prevalent the past few years further fueled it. Adding in the expectation of many folks that this was a sound investment vehicle, and you end up with a glut of oversized housing.
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Old 09-24-2007, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
1,889 posts, read 7,002,365 times
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I have one thought- speaking as a resident of south florida....Many of the legal immigrants that come here are from cultures that support collectivistic ideology (many of them live in extended family households). There's usually several working adults in the home and a few kids. From what I see, their homes are quite large but they are not sectioned off into apartments- the families use the entire home and bring income into it. It may work for them because, say, there are at least 3 or 4 working adults- making at least 25k- 30k (entry level, or labor type of job). Right there, you have a household income of 100k per year. Compare that to the average American family with only 2 adults in the home. Even if the 'average american' was bringing in a double income of 40k each, that's still 20k less than the immigrants in my example. But I do realize your post mentions illegals and I cannot speak for them, about them, or their habits. But for those that migrate and actually stay (legally), this is often what you see.
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Old 09-24-2007, 09:46 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,627,982 times
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The old homes of America looked like hell because alot of the urban nightborhods went to hell. Those people had more than enough money to pay the gardener. They took that money to the suburbs. Anyways, the fad (yes, fad) of McMansions will bite us in our communal asses. Not because of their size, but because they are built horribly. Why would you want a half-million dollar house with vinyl siding and no windows on two sides on a lot where the trees were plowed down? We all know how well these houses will age.
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Old 09-24-2007, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Tucson
42,837 posts, read 77,290,209 times
Reputation: 22814
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaBear View Post
Bear with me here while I put thoughts to ions:

Many years ago there were large houses built in the cities; I am referring in particular to prior to WW II when we had large amounts of immigration from Europe, etc.

Once the flow of immigrants (legal and otherwise) was pinched off; it seemed that many of those 'grand old homes' quickly fell into disrepair due to the owners either having to pay market wages for gardeners, etc. or attempt to maintain their edifices themselves.

Fast forward to the last 10 years or so: does anybody see a parallel between the 'McMansions' and the large numbers of illegal immigrants today?

It would not surprise me to see many of those oversized homes wind up either in ruins or at least sectioned into apartments (assuming it would be tolerated under zoning ordinances) once the illegals are removed.

Something to ponder here.

Moderators; if this thread is in the wrong forum, please move it as you see fit
Well, the idea has been circulating for a while: McMansions Turn 'McApartments,' Stirring Ire - washingtonpost.com

It's certainly nothing new. That's exactly what's happened in many a country after nationalization. The problem is the majority of people here don't care for history much, particularly foreign. Unfortunately, that darn history tends to repeat itself, ya know... Wish I could show you a picture of real "communal living," but can't find any. Watching the movie East-West can help - East-West - Movie - Film.com (http://www.film.com/movies/eastwest/6172482 - broken link).

Sounds too far-fetched? Don't bet your life savings on that thought. Oh, yeah, that guy in the movie (a Russian) also thought nothing like this could happen when he went back to the Soviet Union with his French wife and son. How could it... Stalin "welcomed back" all expats ... Wow, thinking of him twice tonight. Who "woulda thunk" that would happen...
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Old 09-25-2007, 01:28 AM
 
2,432 posts, read 6,014,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
I don't see the parallel between immigration and McMansions, however I do think that we have overbuilt large homes (everybody can define that as they choose). I think that the low interest rates kicked off this construction boom, and the odd financing that was prevalent the past few years further fueled it. Adding in the expectation of many folks that this was a sound investment vehicle, and you end up with a glut of oversized housing.

I agree, and to make matters worse in many areas, like California, you have a housing bubble that is bursting. Some of these wouldn't be so bad if they were on decent sized lots. But in many communities the developers stack them almost one on top of another. In all likelihood, in another ten years or so, many of these McMansions will be split up into apartments.

Which can bring whole new problems into some of these neighborhoods.
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Old 09-25-2007, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,148 posts, read 36,696,242 times
Reputation: 3785
Thank you everyone for your responses.

Also; has anybody noticed that the average lot size seems to hover around 50' x 100'? That size has been around since at least 1900. It is as if that is the best compromise for commuting whether by foot, vehicle, or public transportation, space around individual houses as well as population density to support efficient use of utilities.
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Old 09-25-2007, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,757 posts, read 23,272,892 times
Reputation: 6092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawkeye48 View Post
I agree, and to make matters worse in many areas, like California, you have a housing bubble that is bursting. Some of these wouldn't be so bad if they were on decent sized lots. But in many communities the developers stack them almost one on top of another. In all likelihood, in another ten years or so, many of these McMansions will be split up into apartments.

Which can bring whole new problems into some of these neighborhoods.
This would need to be constructively addressed through zoning restrictions not allowing subdivision of houses. But practically speaking, if folks are willing to accept sharing certain spaces in a house, you really can't prevent it very effectively.
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