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Old 08-08-2012, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,857,919 times
Reputation: 3028

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Quote:
Originally Posted by blacknight04 View Post
Great post! The so called "anti-illegals" base most of their arguments on lies and misinformation. That is why they get all upset and offended when you call them out on it. Keep up the good work!!! CIS is the most biased and anti-immigrant organization founded by the well known racist John Tanton. They are for eliminating ALL FORMS of LEGAL IMMIGRATION. So for them to act like they care about green card holders being displaced( which is a huge lie anyway) is just a bunch of CRAP.
You keep posting these silly accusations in every thread. Yet, you still have not offered even one shred of evidence to disprove anything. If they're lies and misinformation, why can't you prove it? The report I linked was not produced by CIS, or any other so-called racist or anti-immigrant group. It's an official report from the State Department. Do you think John Tanton has influence over State Dept officials?

USCIS has standard fees for specific purposes, which all but illegals have been required to pay. Obama has offered Dreamies temporary status and deferred action. The standard fee to apply for temporary status is $1,130. The standard fee to determine if deferred action should be granted is $585. Add to that $380 for a work permit, and $85 for fingerprinting and the grand total is $2,180. Additional fees may be applicable determined by individual circumstances. Yet, Dreamies are only being charged $380 for a work permit, and $85 for fingerprinting for a grand total of $465. And, again, if they don't want a work permit I assume they won't be required to pay that fee. So, their total could even be as little as $85. Let's not forget, they will also be issued a SS card at taxpayers' expense. But, that's another issue.

So, even if we assume all of the current estimated 1.8 million will want a work permit and pay the total $465, multiply that by 1.8 million and the total revenue is $837 million. Sounds nice, huh? What taxpayer would object to an additional $837M in revenue? Now, multiply 1.8 million by the actual cost of $2170 and the total cost is almost $4 BILLION. Now, do the math. Let me know if I have made an error.

Dreamie Fees: $ 837,000,000
Actual Fees: $ 3,906,000,000 - Which still must be paid

Difference: $ 3,069,000,000 - Borne by taxpayers

Being forced to pay hundreds of millions for illegal aliens was bad enough. But, after computing this, clearly, it's far worse than I imagined.

USCIS - I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

USCIS - I-687, Application for Status as a Temporary Resident Under Section 245A of the Immigration and Nationality Act


Oh, the Pew report as promised. . . .

Quote:
Other Immigration Sources

The Mexican Migration Project is a multidisciplinary research effort between investigators in Mexico and the United States that study the Mexican immigrant experience. The Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) is a research and policy analysis organization that focuses on the impact of immigration on the United States. CIS publishes reports on legal immigration and illegal immigration. The Migration Dialogue provides nonpartisan information and analysis of international migration. The Center for Migration Studies publishes International Migration Review, a quarterly journal on migration issues. The Migration Policy Institute (MPI) is dedicated to the study of the movement of people worldwide and publishes reports on the Migration Information Source. The Urban Institute's Immigration Studies Program studies the impact of U.S. Immigration. Georgetown University's Institute for the Study of International Migration, focuses on all aspects of international migration. The Brookings Institution published several pieces on immigration in the U.S. and has links to other research. The National Conference of State Legislatures' Immigrant Policy Project provides legislative research and analysis on immigration policy issues.
https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...Uu0Lr0igXSPwSA

How many times must this same CIS issue be discussed?

Maryland Dreamers sue to stop democracy

Last edited by Benicar; 08-08-2012 at 06:48 PM..
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Old 08-08-2012, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,029,168 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
...USCIS has standard fees for specific purposes, which all but illegals have been required to pay. Obama has offered Dreamies temporary status and deferred action. The standard fee to apply for temporary status is $1,130. The standard fee to determine if deferred action should be granted is $585. Add to that $380 for a work permit, and $85 for fingerprinting and the grand total is $2,180. Additional fees may be applicable determined by individual circumstances. Yet, Dreamies are only being charged $380 for a work permit, and $85 for fingerprinting for a grand total of $465. And, again, if they don't want a work permit I assume they won't be required to pay that fee. So, their total could even be as little as $85. Let's not forget, they will also be issued a SS card at taxpayers' expense. But, that's another issue.

So, even if we assume all of the current estimated 1.8 million will want a work permit and pay the total $465, multiply that by 1.8 million and the total revenue is $837 million. Sounds nice, huh? What taxpayer would object to an additional $837M in revenue? Now, multiply 1.8 million by the actual cost of $2170 and the total cost is almost $4 BILLION. Now, do the math. Let me know if I have made an error.

Dreamie Fees: $ 837,000,000
Actual Fees: $ 3,906,000,000 - Which still must be paid

Difference: $ 3,069,000,000 - Borne by taxpayers

Being forced to pay hundreds of millions for illegal aliens was bad enough. But, after computing this, clearly, it's far worse than I imagined...
So if other applicants are filing petitions like an I-191, "Application for Advance Permission to Return to Unrelinquished Domicile", for $585, and DACA members are not, that's over a billion dollars more "borne by taxpayers"? Why are you computing a difference in total petition fee amounts for different categories, then phrasing it as a burden to taxpayers, a funding source that USCIS has never used? USCIS could double fees, and any surplus is not going back to taxpayers either.

The error you made is that the difference is nothing close to a "cost"...

You need a petition for "Presenting Cockamamie Math"...
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,857,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
So if other applicants are filing petitions like an I-191, "Application for Advance Permission to Return to Unrelinquished Domicile", for $585, and DACA members are not, that's over a billion dollars more "borne by taxpayers"? Why are you computing a difference in total petition fee amounts for different categories, then phrasing it as a burden to taxpayers, a funding source that USCIS has never used? USCIS could double fees, and any surplus is not going back to taxpayers either.

The error you made is that the difference is nothing close to a "cost"...

You need a petition for "Presenting Cockamamie Math"...
You are really grasping at straws. When did I mention I-191? That's right, I didn't. So, why, other than being desperate and disingenuous, would you try to dispute me by referencing something totally unrelated to the info I posted? The I-191: Application for Advance Permission to Return to Unrelinquished Domicile, and the petitions I posted, I-601: Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility, and I-687: Application for Status as a Temporary Resident have absolutely NOTHING in common.

Clearly, the only one trying to obfuscate is YOU. It is a fact Obama has offered illegals the opportunity for temporary status, deferred action, and work permits. I have provided verifiable data and actual fees charged by USCIS. I even linked to the USCIS website for the convenience of all who may wish to verify the amounts I posted. As for USCIS doubling fees, that is certainly their prerogative. However, that has no bearing on the issue at hand, which is, the fees being waived for illegals that must be borne by taxpayers.

Perhaps you can explain how deferred action will be determined by federal employees, who must spend countless hours examining documents and verifying information; or, how illegals will go through the normal procedures to establish temporary status, again, by federal employees assigned to those tasks, by ONLY paying for the cost of a work permit and fingerprinting. I notice you haven't tried to dispute the paltry $465 total fee, because you know that is all illegals are being required to pay. Do you actually believe the thousands of employees and contractors required for such a project, including the FBI and other law enforcement agencies, will be willing to volunteer their services? Only in your dreams.

By your own admission, USCIS petitions are fee-based. I have clearly demonstrated illegals, unlike others, are not being charged for the most costly services. So, if taxpayers will not foot the bill, who, pray tell, will pay?

Indeed the difference is a cost. While I am not an accountant, I do believe if the cost for services exceeds the total revenue, it then becomes a liability/deficit, not an asset. I based my computation on the number of estimated petitioners, multiplied by fees charged, then compared that to the actual fees charged for those services. There is nothing "cockamamie" involved in my computation. But, you know that.

As previously stated, the ONLY way this will not cost taxpayers monetarily, is if the government has no intentions of actually conducting background checks, or requiring illegals to go through the established immigration process. If this is the plan, and their so-called temporary status and deferred action will simply be rubber-stamped, then this is an even greater travesty, and will prove to be far more costly to citizens victimized by rogue illegals who were allowed to slip through the cracks. This will also prove to be an action Obama and supporters of DACA will sorely regret.

For your convenience, I am re-posting the two petitions in question. Note, the absence of I-191.



USCIS - I-601, Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility

Quote:
Purpose of Form :
An alien who is ineligible to be admitted to the United States as an immigrant or to adjust status in the United States, and certain nonimmigrant applicants who are inadmissible, must file this form to seek a waiver of certain grounds of inadmissibility.

All 11 pages must be submitted.

Filing Fee :
$585
Please note the following petition is rarely offered, for obvious reasons. We stopped offering "temporary status" to illegal aliens in 1988. Until now, the official policy after the mass amnesty of 1986 stated we would NEVER again reward people for being in this country illegally.

USCIS - I-687, Application for Status as a Temporary Resident Under Section 245A of the Immigration and Nationality Act

Quote:
Purpose of Form :
For use during the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) Section 245 A legalization program of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, which ended in 1988. The form is now used to apply to USCIS for benefits under the terms and conditions of certain settlement agreements.

Currently there is no filing period open for the submission of this Form. Applications may be accepted under certain special circumstances, and those applicants will be provided an address by USCIS when appropriate.

Filing Fee :$1,130. (An $85 fee per applicant over 14 years of age for biometrics services may be required. See form instructions.)


IBM, if you are unable to debate this issue with honesty and integrity, consider this my last response to you.

Last edited by Benicar; 08-09-2012 at 08:47 AM..
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,029,168 times
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A little out of order, and quite a bit of baloney trimmed:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
...IBM, if you are unable to debate this issue with honesty and integrity, consider this my last response to you...
This is quite the statement, especially considering your comments on this topic...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
You are really grasping at straws. When did I mention I-191? That's right, I didn't. So, why, other than being desperate and disingenuous, would you try to dispute me by referencing something totally unrelated to the info I posted? The I-191: Application for Advance Permission to Return to Unrelinquished Domicile, and the petitions I posted, I-601: Application for Waiver of Grounds of Inadmissibility, and I-687: Application for Status as a Temporary Resident have absolutely NOTHING in common.

Clearly, the only one trying to obfuscate is YOU. It is a fact Obama has offered illegals the opportunity for temporary status, deferred action, and work permits. I have provided verifiable data and actual fees charged by USCIS. I even linked to the USCIS website for the convenience of all who may wish to verify the amounts I posted. As for USCIS doubling fees, that is certainly their prerogative. However, that has no bearing on the issue at hand, which is, the fees being waived for illegals that must be borne by taxpayers.

Perhaps you can explain how deferred action will be determined by federal employees, who must spend countless hours examining documents and verifying information; or, how illegals will go through the normal procedures to establish temporary status, again, by federal employees assigned to those tasks, by ONLY paying for the cost of a work permit and fingerprinting. I notice you haven't tried to dispute the paltry $465 total fee, because you know that is all illegals are being required to pay. Do you actually believe the thousands of employees and contractors required for such a project, including the FBI and other law enforcement agencies, will be willing to volunteer their services? Only in your dreams.

By your own admission, USCIS petitions are fee-based. I have clearly demonstrated illegals, unlike others, are not being charged for the most costly services. So, if taxpayers will not foot the bill, who, pray tell, will pay?

Indeed the difference is a cost. While I am not an accountant, I do believe if the cost for services exceeds the total revenue, it then becomes a liability/deficit, not an asset. I based my computation on the number of estimated petitioners, multiplied by fees charged, then compared that to the actual fees charged for those services. There is nothing "cockamamie" involved in my computation. But, you know that.

As previously stated, the ONLY way this will not cost taxpayers monetarily, is if the government has no intentions of actually conducting background checks, or requiring illegals to go through the established immigration process. If this is the plan, and their so-called temporary status and deferred action will simply be rubber-stamped, then this is an even greater travesty, and will prove to be far more costly to citizens victimized by rogue illegals who were allowed to slip through the cracks. This will also prove to be an action Obama and supporters of DACA will sorely regret...
I brought up the I-191 to show how you are failing to rationally grasp that a difference in petition category fees is not a "cost", nor will that amount be "borne by taxpayers". How much time do you think it takes to adjudicate an I-191, with a petition fee of $585.00? The amount is made artificially high, because we don't want to encourage someone with residency here to be outside the United States more than a year.

The I-601 (most commonly used for an illegal alien that is married to a U.S. citizen) is ultimately to gain legal residency, a different petitioning level. An I-765 (work authorization for a non-immigrant) is the closest petition at USCIS with a comparison to DACA applicants, but is only $380, and can be a longer term than 2 years (it lasts as long as the non-immigrant visa status, and does provide an appropriate ID at no additional cost). You referred to background checks, run by the FBI, but USCIS never compensates the FBI for the investigations it conducts (it is the role of that agency, no matter if they are checking on or for another government agency; Years ago, the backlog of naturalization "name checks" were caused by the FBI).

How you got to the point of thinking that any waived fees, or incomparable petition amounts, are paid by U.S. taxpayers is beyond me. The hyperbole distracts from rational discussion. I've shown what comparable petitions at USCIS do, and given the background to how the process works in a concise, easy to understand method. Whether you want to continue that discussion with me is up to you, but take out that false posturing please.
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Old 08-14-2012, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,857,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
A little out of order, and quite a bit of baloney trimmed:
I see somebody didn't do his homework again.

My comments were not out of order. Nor were they baloney. I am trying to have a serious discussion regarding a very serious issue. In response, all you have done is deflect and/or make snide remarks. Sorry, but I can't take you seriously when you behave in this manner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
This is quite the statement, especially considering your comments on this topic...
And, I stand by the comments you bolded. Unlike you, I actually know how the system works. Perhaps you thought I was pulling your leg when I said I have consulted on several major government projects; which, by the way, includes involvement in the development, implementation, and rollout for the agency now known as DHS. Or, did you think DHS just opened shop one day without the hard work and dedication of thousands?

I reiterate. Without charging the appropriate fees, DHS cannot provide the services required for this project. So, they will either rubber-stamp applications, or the fees will be covered by others. It's just that simple. Since USCIS services are fee-based, the costs waived for Dreamies will be recouped either by increasing fees charged to legal immigrants, which is highly unlikely, would be cost-prohibitive, and incredibly unfair. Or, the most likely scenario will be to divert tax funds appropriated for special TPS circumstances.

If you actually knew what you were talking about, you would know this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
I brought up the I-191 to show how you are failing to rationally grasp that a difference in petition category fees is not a "cost", nor will that amount be "borne by taxpayers". How much time do you think it takes to adjudicate an I-191, with a petition fee of $585.00? The amount is made artificially high, because we don't want to encourage someone with residency here to be outside the United States more than a year.
No, you mentioned I-191 to deflect from the issue being discussed. Nothing more, nothing less.

No matter how hard you try, you cannot change the fact that USCIS charges specific fees for specific petitions based on COSTS to provide those services. Dreamies are NOT being charged those fees. So, naturally, someone else, in this case, taxpayers, will pay.

Quote:
USCIS fees are based on the relative identifiable costs associated with providing each particular benefit or service in adherence with government-wide fee setting guidelines in OMB Circular A-25, the CFO Act, and FASAB guidance. Filing fees do not function as tariffs, generate general revenue to support broader policy decisions, or like fines to deter unwanted behavior.

Besides those policies, filing fees are not used to favor businesses, families, geographical areas, influence larger public policy in favor of or in opposition to immigration, limit immigration, support broader infrastructure, or impact costs beyond USCIS.

DHS designed this rule to establish fees sufficient to reimburse the costs of processing immigration benefit requests and the related operating costs of USCIS. While USCIS has authority to collect fees for broader government-wide costs of administering the United States immigration system, DHS has chosen to structure the fees to recover only the projected full operational cost.

In addition, since fees provide the capacity necessary for USCIS to do the work associated with the filing, when fees do not fully recover costs USCIS is unable to maintain sufficient capacity to process the work. This diminished capacity could significantly delay immigration, an impact which can be far more of a burden on a family than the proposed change in filing fee.
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
The I-601 (most commonly used for an illegal alien that is married to a U.S. citizen) is ultimately to gain legal residency, a different petitioning level. An I-765 (work authorization for a non-immigrant) is the closest petition at USCIS with a comparison to DACA applicants, but is only $380, and can be a longer term than 2 years (it lasts as long as the non-immigrant visa status, and does provide an appropriate ID at no additional cost). You referred to background checks, run by the FBI, but USCIS never compensates the FBI for the investigations it conducts (it is the role of that agency, no matter if they are checking on or for another government agency; Years ago, the backlog of naturalization "name checks" were caused by the FBI).
Again, you are showing your ignorance. There's a reason USCIS charges $85 for fingerprinting, and it isn't determined arbitrarily. Contrary to your misinformed belief, there are indeed costs associated with those charges. Or, do you think the fact that DHS and the FBI are both federal agencies means they offer inter-agency services free of charge? Newsflash: Government agencies don't barter services. They are separate entities, with individual budgets and funding, and must operate within those constraints.

I won't even delve into the specific purposes for the petitions. The most salient fact remains, Dreamies are only being charged fees to cover work permits and fingerprinting.

Quote:
Federal agencies spend over $50 billion annually on goods and services using interagency contracts, which leverage the government's buying power, simplify procuring commonly used goods and services, and allow agencies to use the contracts and expertise of other agencies. Agencies that operate interagency contracts and provide assisted acquisition services for other agencies recover their costs by charging a fee to their customers.
U.S. GAO - Interagency Contracting: Improvements Needed in Setting Fee Rates for Selected Programs

Quote:
To the extent not supported by appropriations, the cost of providing free or reduced services must be transferred to all other fee-paying applicants. That is one reason why USCIS is relatively conservative with respect to intentionally transferring costs from one applicant to others through fee waivers.

Asylees are not required to pay filing fees for employment authorization documents, providing them with a means to become gainfully employed and earn wages to cover the cost of adjustment. 8 CFR 103.7(c). Granting an exemption to adjustment of status fees for this class of immigrant will increase the fees paid by other applicants.
Quote:
The biometrics fee covers costs associated with the use of the collected biometrics to pay the cost of FBI and other background checks. Thus, an applicant will pay the biometrics fee whenever he or she files another immigration benefit request that requires the collection, updating, or use of biometrics for background checks.

Biometric fees will continue to balance the initial capture, reuse, identity verification, and anti-fraud functions performed whenever an applicant or petitioner, or other individual, is required to submit fingerprints.
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
How you got to the point of thinking that any waived fees, or incomparable petition amounts, are paid by U.S. taxpayers is beyond me. The hyperbole distracts from rational discussion. I've shown what comparable petitions at USCIS do, and given the background to how the process works in a concise, easy to understand method. Whether you want to continue that discussion with me is up to you, but take out that false posturing please.
Again, a fee is required for each petition to cover the costs for services rendered. When fees are waived, as in this particular amnesty, they must be recouped. It is safe to assume DHS has no intentions of devastating legal immigrants with such a prohibitive and unfair burden. After all, we are talking about billions of dollars, not a few hundred thousand. Therefore, the ONLY option is to use tax-funded appropriations earmarked for special circumstances.

Quote:
USCIS believes that it is important that fees be based as much as possible on the relative identifiable costs associated with providing each particular benefit or service to follow the spirit of government-wide fee setting guidelines in OMB Circular A-25, the CFO Act, and FASAB guidance. USCIS uses an activity-based cost model to determine the appropriate fee for each immigration benefit request. This model considers a variety of factors such as budgetary costs, the number of anticipated requests, the time necessary to adjudicate the request, the locations that receipt and complete the request and their associated resources, and the number of fee waivers or exemptions that may be granted for each form type.

To the extent not supported by appropriations, the cost of providing free or reduced services must be transferred to all other fee-paying applicants. That is one reason why USCIS is relatively conservative with respect to intentionally transferring costs from one applicant to others through fee waivers.
Quote:
When no appropriations are received, or fees are statutorily set at a level that does not recover costs, or DHS determines that a type of application should be exempt from payment of fees, USCIS must use funds derived from other fee applications to fund overall requirements and general operations.

In the absence of appropriations, however, USCIS's only funding source is fee revenue.
Next time, do a little research. Then, perhaps you'll be better-equipped to offer facts, rather than your unapprised opinion and nonsensical assumptions. It will also help you easily discern between "hyperbole/false posturing" and the unadulterated truth. Stick with what you have learned through your immigration experience, and stop trying to portray yourself as a legal immigration SME.


DHS Source: Federal Register, Volume 75 Issue 185 (Friday, September 24, 2010)

Last edited by Benicar; 08-14-2012 at 11:19 AM.. Reason: To add additional info.
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Old 08-14-2012, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
A fee charged for the deferred action application would ensure the process does not pose an extra burden on taxpayers, Napolitano said.
Homeland Security Today: Napolitano Defends Deferred Action on Immigration Enforcement for Qualified Young Illegal Aliens


What "fee" would that be, Janet? Not only have you not included a fee for deferred action, you also have ignored the fee for a temporary status petition. Since applications will be accepted starting tomorrow, when do you plan to add this charge? Or, is your so-called "Deferred Action Application" merely an application for a work permit?
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,029,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
...No matter how hard you try, you cannot change the fact that USCIS charges specific fees for specific petitions based on COSTS to provide those services. Dreamies are NOT being charged those fees. So, naturally, someone else, in this case, taxpayers, will pay...
Of course the bureaucracy of USCIS is going to say their petition fees are based closely to "costs". Look over the previously mentioned one-page I-191 petition, and tell me what takes $585 to process. The N-300 is $250 to make a declaration of becoming a citizen!

My last experience with USCIS was to add biometric data to my stepson's Resident Card (a requirement when an LPR becomes 14 years-old). If filed within a month of the 14th birthday, it is only the $85 biometric fee. Otherwise it is $450 total.

I called beforehand, to make sure the filing amount was correct for our promptness. USCIS rejected the petition, and said I needed to pay the full amount. So I called USCIS again, gained the representative's badge number and name after being told again I filed the correct fee, and re-submitted the application. Ultimately they hope to cause enough delays or confusion to collect more fees, and it is a relatively common occurrence (the filing address for my wife's initial I-765 was changed after we sent it in, but they attempted to keep the fee, and reject the petition for being filed to the wrong address; Amazingly the check is forwarded to the correct address to cash it).

I can believe you would defend such a demented system, and suddenly become more concerned for the time and petition fees that those processing through USCIS have when being used as an argument against illegal aliens. For the level DACA is, the petition fees are appropriate, placed higher than work authorization is for non-immigrants. Taxpayer funding has never supported USCIS, you can say it does a million times, but it will not become true.
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Old 08-15-2012, 04:59 AM
 
25,370 posts, read 37,683,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
4.6 Million Waiting for Green Cards Displaced by Dreamers | Center for Immigration Studies

No line? Click the waiting list on the above link. And, despite having untold millions of illegal Mexicans in this country, Mexico outnumbers all countries, with over 1 million waiting to enter through legal channels. It is not humanly possible for DHS to process the estimated 1.8 million deferred action applications as promised, unless they do not intend to conduct background checks, or require Dreamies to go through the normal process. Otherwise, it will take years. Of course, that could be the plan. Obama can still say he tried.

Oh, before the CIS bashers chime in, they link directly to the U.S. Department of State.
That is just one big issue! The other issue is that legal aliens have to pay thousands of dollars to stay here, while illegals pay less than $400!....and we have no clue who they are!
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Old 08-16-2012, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Of course the bureaucracy of USCIS is going to say their petition fees are based closely to "costs". Look over the previously mentioned one-page I-191 petition, and tell me what takes $585 to process. The N-300 is $250 to make a declaration of becoming a citizen!
To my knowledge, you have never worked for USCIS or any of the agencies involved in the immigration process. So, how can you presume to know what their jobs entail, let alone the time required to perform those tasks? Do you actually think employees just wave a magic wand, and voila! millions of petitions are processed and applicants are set to go? Lacking a factual basis for your assertion, you rely solely on your opinion and assumptions, which are so off-the-wall it's beyond belief.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
My last experience with USCIS was to add biometric data to my stepson's Resident Card (a requirement when an LPR becomes 14 years-old). If filed within a month of the 14th birthday, it is only the $85 biometric fee. Otherwise it is $450 total.

I called beforehand, to make sure the filing amount was correct for our promptness. USCIS rejected the petition, and said I needed to pay the full amount. So I called USCIS again, gained the representative's badge number and name after being told again I filed the correct fee, and re-submitted the application. Ultimately they hope to cause enough delays or confusion to collect more fees, and it is a relatively common occurrence (the filing address for my wife's initial I-765 was changed after we sent it in, but they attempted to keep the fee, and reject the petition for being filed to the wrong address; Amazingly the check is forwarded to the correct address to cash it).
More baseless assumptions. But, despite your immigration ordeal, you continue to support illegals who avoid these hassles by circumventing the law. Incredible!

Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
I can believe you would defend such a demented system, and suddenly become more concerned for the time and petition fees that those processing through USCIS have when being used as an argument against illegal aliens. For the level DACA is, the petition fees are appropriate, placed higher than work authorization is for non-immigrants. Taxpayer funding has never supported USCIS, you can say it does a million times, but it will not become true.
No, I defend the right of this country to charge fees to non-citizens for the privilege of residing in this country. And, my argument is based on the fact that legal immigrants are being placed at the back of the line behind illegal aliens. I also oppose fees being waived for this so-called deferred actions, which will ultimately burden taxpayers and/or legal immigrants. In my opinion, this is wrong. You are certainly entitled to disagree.

You clearly don't understand the resources required for this project if you actually believe the fees charged Dreamies are appropriate. They are here illegally and have used aliases, fake documents, stolen SSNs, and more. How on earth do you believe charging only for the cost of a work permit and fingerprinting could even begin to cover the costs associated with conducting a thorough investigation and processing the necessary info?

Obviously, others also take issue with this unfair and unnecessary burden. . .

Quote:
Washington, D.C. – House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) and Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) today sent a letter to Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano expressing concern about the Department’s plan to grant deferred action to illegal immigrants, particularly with regard to how the plan will be funded without imposing additional taxes on American citizens. The letter also raises fiscal concerns of the new policy relating to the management of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), a fee-based agency.

The letter urges Secretary Napolitano to clarify the rationale behind the fee assessment for illegal immigrants and to explain why this plan puts the interests of illegal immigrants ahead of the interests of legal immigrants and American taxpayers.

The decision not to charge a fee for form I-821D processing threatens a return to enormous backlogs and another request to Congress for appropriated funds. It is wrong to put the interests of illegal immigrants ahead of the interests of legal immigrants and U.S. citizens. And it is an additional insult to make U.S. taxpayers foot the bill for this massive amnesty program.
Smith and Grassley to DHS: Who Will Cover the Cost of Administrative Amnesty?

Sorry, but taxpayers do indeed fund USCIS and all government agencies. Do you actually not realize federal appropriations are tax-funded? Or, do you simply not understand the concept of appropriations?

ap·pro·pri·a·tion (-prpr-shn)
n.
1. The act of appropriating.
2.
a. Something appropriated, especially public funds set aside for a specific purpose.
b. A legislative act authorizing the expenditure of a designated amount of public funds for a specific purpose.

Who do you think paid the fees for those here on TPS? Hint: Not the refugees. Do you honestly believe the government charged fees to Haitians fleeing the earthquake; or, the thousands offered TPS from Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Somalia, Sudan, and most recently, Syria? Rarely does a refugee have the means to pay. C'mon, use your head.

While funding for USCIS is primarily fee-based, millions of tax funds are appropriated to cover costs for hardship cases such as refugees. It's hard to believe you actually don't know this.

Quote:
Our budget request for FY 2011 builds on these important steps. The budget request seeks $2.8 billion in funding, of which $2.4 billion is financed through fee revenue and $386 million is funded with appropriations. The appropriations request is $162 million above the FY 2010 enacted level. This increase largely accounts for our request for fully funding the asylum and refugee programs through appropriations. USCIS continues to face a marked decline in fee revenue from levels projected prior to the downturn in the economy. The budget request for fee-financed programs reflects both cost and fee-financing adjustments in response to a changed revenue environment for the foreseeable future.
http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS/Resources...y_03162010.pdf

The I-821D petition for the so-called DACA is very similar to the TPS petition. In fact, some are referring to it as TPS-light. And, that's exactly what it is. Please explain how they are being charged for this petition when the only fees charged are for work permits and fingerprinting? If you honestly don't believe taxpayers will foot the bill for this, you are either in denial, or willfully ignorant.
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