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Old 09-05-2012, 05:07 PM
 
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What was the "path to citizenship" during the late 19 century early 20th century and now?
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Old 09-05-2012, 05:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by IllmaticReigns82 View Post
What was the "path to citizenship" during the late 19 century early 20th century and now?
Times were different back then. We were a vast frontier in need of workers. Not so today. However, we still allow in 1 million legal immigrants per year today.
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Old 09-05-2012, 06:02 PM
 
Location: California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IllmaticReigns82 View Post
What was the "path to citizenship" during the late 19 century early 20th century and now?
Back then, one had to get the authorization of their own government to allow them to leave their own nation. Once arrived at a port of entry of the US, one had to prove many things, health, wealth, mental wellness, etc. If found to be undesirable, they were put back on the ship they just arrived from.

Today, they must apply for a visa and prove their intent from our consul in their country.

Really not much different from then until now.
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Old 09-05-2012, 06:10 PM
 
Location: NC
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Originally Posted by IllmaticReigns82 View Post
What was the "path to citizenship" during the late 19 century early 20th century and now?
Now we are actually somewhat more liberal with our citizenship laws. There is a perception that in the late 19th and early 20th centuries we would somehow just let everyone in, but back then immigration was largely limited to white people. In 1882 Chinese were banned from immigrating. In 1924 they tried to tighten it even further to encourage immigration of only certain white people. The 1924 act pretty much slowed Italian, Greek and Jewish immigration to a trickle. It wasn't until 1965 that we had a somewhat equitable immigration policy.
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Old 09-05-2012, 06:14 PM
 
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"Ellis Island and Now, What's the difference?"

Trains, planes and automobiles?
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Old 09-05-2012, 08:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Randomstudent View Post
Now we are actually somewhat more liberal with our citizenship laws. There is a perception that in the late 19th and early 20th centuries we would somehow just let everyone in, but back then immigration was largely limited to white people. In 1882 Chinese were banned from immigrating. In 1924 they tried to tighten it even further to encourage immigration of only certain white people. The 1924 act pretty much slowed Italian, Greek and Jewish immigration to a trickle. It wasn't until 1965 that we had a somewhat equitable immigration policy.
The problem is that the floodgates were opened in 1965 to every third world immigrant that could get here. I am all for legal immigration in reasonable numbers while including diversity. Today however, everyone south of our border has by far been given preferential treatment. That doesn't even count their large numbers here illegally. That's not diversity to me.
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Old 09-06-2012, 12:15 AM
 
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Yes, in the Ellis Island days, there were workers needed for the Industrial Revolution and great Manufacturing age -- many factories, many workers were needed.

Today the illegals are pouring over the border but there are not many jobs. Agricultural jobs are on the decline, 3% decline each year and there are fewer than 800,000 total jobs in agriculture. Factories are shut down. We don't need millions of impoverished people pouring over the border who will be very dependent on government programs like Medicaid, food stamps, WIC, Section 8 and so on.
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Old 09-06-2012, 12:26 AM
 
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I see the romanticization of the great Ellis Island immigration period hasn't waned a bit.

De-Romanticizing Our Immigrant Past: Why Claiming "My Family Came Legally" Is Often a Myth | Immigration Policy Center

This is the most interesting excerpt:

Quote:
Every restriction generated illegal immigration. The Asian exclusion laws resulted in an “illegal” Asian population. As laws were passed to keep out less desirable Eastern and Southern Europeans, immigrants from those countries—as well as others who could not pass literacy tests, pay the head tax, or enter through the quota system—began to enter illegally. In 1925, the Immigration Service reported 1.4 million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally. A June 17, 1923, New York Times article reported that W. H. Husband, commissioner general of immigration, had been trying for two years “to stem the flow of immigrants from central and southern Europe, Africa and Asia that has been leaking across the borders of Mexico and Canada and through the ports of the east and west coasts.” A September 16, 1927, New York Times article describes government plans for stepped-up Coast Guard patrols because thousands of Chinese, Japanese, Greeks, Russians, and Italians were landing in Cuba and then hiring smugglers to take them to the U.S. illegally. Many immigrants were also violating the laws of their home countries which required them to get permission to migrate, complete military service, or pay off debts prior to leaving.
Yea...everyone coming here were SOOOOOOOOOOOO legal in those years. No one from Europe ever broke the immigration laws.
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Old 09-06-2012, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Too far from home.
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Then: no government handouts. People came in the hope to prosper through hard work and success and have a better future for their children. Through sacrifice their children became educated, and for them that was a major success. Failure meant returning to their country.

Now: Those legally immigrating to the US come with the hope to prosper through hard work and success and have a better future for their children. They are not entitled to government handouts. If they let their work visas and green cards expire, become illegal, have a child born on US soil, they will qualify for every government handout that the government can provide, in addition to having the right to breaking laws.
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Old 09-06-2012, 07:46 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 2,385,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desertdetroiter View Post
I see the romanticization of the great Ellis Island immigration period hasn't waned a bit.

De-Romanticizing Our Immigrant Past: Why Claiming "My Family Came Legally" Is Often a Myth | Immigration Policy Center

This is the most interesting excerpt:



Yea...everyone coming here were SOOOOOOOOOOOO legal in those years. No one from Europe ever broke the immigration laws.
They didn't expect subsidies from the American taxpayer, come in the middle of the Great Depression or demand Americans learn Italian and Yiddish.



Most of the people in question actually had better skills than many natives.
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