U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies > Illegal Immigration
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-08-2013, 05:58 PM
 
32,523 posts, read 14,964,153 times
Reputation: 8701

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Here it is again:



Your phrasing it as a desire ("want to come", as well as terminology that seems to put the qualification only to fees that would be paid by the immigrant themselves) puts it in a context other than being qualified (a legitimate ability to be sponsored) to legally immigrate...
What?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-11-2013, 02:20 AM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,534,875 times
Reputation: 7708
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Visitors on the other hand are subject to a personal interview with a CBSA agent, and a thorough check of their documents and baggage.
LOL, the last time I visited Canada (granted it was before 9/11) my personal interview consisted of three questions. 1. What are you doing in Canada? 2. How long will you be here? 3. What are you bringing with you? The only documentation they checked was my customs declaration form, that I had filled out. They checked that between asking me question #2 and question #3. They never asked me for any ID and didn't even look at my baggage. They cleared me in less then two minutes. For all they knew I could have been a terrorist from a third world country, with a bag full of assault rifles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 02:44 AM
 
9,665 posts, read 8,395,232 times
Reputation: 3225
Before 9/11 is a VERY BIG THING.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 07:09 AM
 
32,523 posts, read 14,964,153 times
Reputation: 8701
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
LOL, the last time I visited Canada (granted it was before 9/11) my personal interview consisted of three questions. 1. What are you doing in Canada? 2. How long will you be here? 3. What are you bringing with you? The only documentation they checked was my customs declaration form, that I had filled out. They checked that between asking me question #2 and question #3. They never asked me for any ID and didn't even look at my baggage. They cleared me in less then two minutes. For all they knew I could have been a terrorist from a third world country, with a bag full of assault rifles.
My wife's experience was quite different when trying to enter the Canadian border with her sisters and it was prior to 9/11 also. They were all drilled and had to provide ID to enter. Hmm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 08:56 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,676 posts, read 31,523,879 times
Reputation: 26817
Keeping my fingers crossed that work will transfer me to Toronto. Canada sounds like paradise compared to this craphole of a state that's being overrun by illegals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 09:34 AM
 
32,523 posts, read 14,964,153 times
Reputation: 8701
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
Keeping my fingers crossed that work will transfer me to Toronto. Canada sounds like paradise compared to this craphole of a state that's being overrun by illegals.
I hope you get the transfer and I so envy you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,676 posts, read 31,523,879 times
Reputation: 26817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldglory View Post
I hope you get the transfer and I so envy you.
It's a less than 50% chance to be honest. If they transfer me to Canada at all, it's more likely that they will try to get me to go to Halifax in Nova Scotia which isn't very attractive to me since Nova Scotia is pretty remote.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,108,173 times
Reputation: 6731
KaBoom :

Yes, MANY things have changed at the US Canada border, since your country was attacked.

Our Canadian Customs and Immigration officers were never armed, and they didn't carry batons and pepper spray, and didn't wear protective vests. Now they are armed, and have all the other items as well.

Since 2009, YOUR Government requires EVERYONE, including US citizens to have a valid passport, to GET BACK INTO THE USA. Period. Of course the Canadian Government is well aware of that change in your laws, so we also require a passport, or a Nexus card from all Americans who want to enter Canada, so that they can re-enter the states, again.

I am old enough ( 66 ) to remember being able to cross into the USA with just a Canadian birth certficate and a Ontario Provincial driver's license, to go to Buffalo NY to drink in the bars. At that time, in the late 60's the legal age in Ontario to drink was 21, while in NYS it was only 18. Now that rule is reversed , with Ontario at 19 and NYS at 21. We sure helped the economy of Buffalo back in those days, with our bar bills and motel room rentals. Even then, we were smart enough not to drink and try to drive back home, to Toronto.

A further change is the multi- force Police border teams, that are made up of both Canadian and American law enforcement officers, that work together on BOTH sides of the border. If they make an arrest, it is done by the guys in whose country the arrest takes place in. With this new enforcement approach, the border is more secure, and intelligence is communicated more effectively.

Canada and the USA share a common data base, that draws information from BOTH CPIC ( Canadian Police Information Centre) and NCIC. It allows border officers in both countries to do "real time " checks on persons, vehicles, possible stolen items, and warrants , and wanted persons, and criminal records, as well as checking past border information, such as persons previously denied entry, or found to be illegal in one country or the other. When a vehicle approaches the control booth, the cameras read the license plate and run the vehicle owner, and the status of their driver's licence . When the individual person's passport is swiped through the reader, the validity of the document is checked, and the information is recorded, and the last cross border trip is highlighted, per date and location.

After I retired from the Canadian Forces, at age 50, I spent a few years as a owner/operator, for a expedite freight company based in Ontario. Most of my trips were to the USA, usually with air craft engine parts, that were required for a commercial plane that was stuck on the ground. Some times I crossed the international border three times in a week, if I was doing short runs to NYC or Kentucky. Obviously, I dealt with US customs officers every time I brought in a commercial shipment, to the USA. I had no problems at all, but I saw many other drivers who got into trouble, because they didn't know enough to keep their mouth shut, and simply say " Yes Sir " .

That goes for travel in either direction, across the line.

Jim B

Toronto.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,108,173 times
Reputation: 6731
Big D geek :

I know that you like my country, and want to live here.....but you will have to do some mental adjustments, about what in Canada is "remote ".

Seriously, Halifax is a modern city and it has lots to do and see, for both visitors and those that live there. i was stationed there during my time in the Canadian Forces , and it's a city that has a vibrant arts and music scene, as well as many places that are just lovely, as far as scenery and the outdoors goes.

Now, if you want to talk about remote, in Canada, look up Goose Bay, Labrador, or Churchill, Manitoba, or even Yellowknife, North West Territories.

Churchill is famous for it's winter polar bear population, which the rangers keep trapping and flying out of town, in a cargo net, with helicopters. Goose Bay has only recently had a highway built to connect it to the Province of Quebec.

The NWT only has about 35,000 population, in TOTAL, and 25,000 of them live in "The Knife ". Guess what the biggest private employer is in Yellowknife... .....a diamond cutting and polishing company, that hires from skilled workers from Antwerp Belgium and Isreal, to finish the newest natural resource item....NWT diamonds. Each one has a micro size polar bear that is lazer etched on it, so that they are not confused with the " blood diamonds " that come out of dictator run countries in Africa.

Our newest Territory is Nunavut, which is the eastern part of what used to be the NWT. It has the fewest people of any Province or Territory in Canada. The people who live there are mainly Innuit, and they have a completely different culture, language and way of life, from our First Nations people, who live farther south. Here is a link to the website for the Government of Nunavut. Read about the challenges of trying to provide education, health care and transportation, in a place that is well north of the Arctic Circle, with the biggest population centre having only 6,000 people in it, and some places that are only 500 people in total.

Welcome Government of Nunavut

Jim B

Toronto.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,676 posts, read 31,523,879 times
Reputation: 26817
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Big D geek :

I know that you like my country, and want to live here.....but you will have to do some mental adjustments, about what in Canada is "remote ".

Seriously, Halifax is a modern city and it has lots to do and see, for both visitors and those that live there. i was stationed there during my time in the Canadian Forces , and it's a city that has a vibrant arts and music scene, as well as many places that are just lovely, as far as scenery and the outdoors goes.

Jim B

Toronto.
I guess 'remote' is relative; I was born and raised in what is now the fourth-largest metro area in the United States (Dallas-Fort Worth) and have lived in other major cities in Europe, so I'm very used to the big city scene. Halifax would not be the smallest city I've ever lived in, but pretty darn close to it...and I did not like living in a small city.

I'm sure it's lovely, I'm just not sure it would be a good place for ME.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies > Illegal Immigration
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top