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Old 06-21-2014, 10:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most infant mortality is neonatal mortality, e.g. the first 28 days of life, during which kids are only eligible for the Hepatitis B vaccine.
I live in an area with high numbers of illegals -- I'm very healthy and so am not overly concerned with getting sick from them but they do have a very high rate of hepatitis B and C -- I don't believe there's a vaccine for C, and they have a lot of TB even though they have vaccines for TB. They have a lot of STD's -including HIV- again, that doesn't concern me much as far as my own health but the costs of their health care certainly does.

Illegals actually tend to be fairly tough because of the high infant -- and childhood mortality rates where they're from only the toughest ones survive to adulthood.

One case here, this illegal couple had arrived when she was in the late stages of pregnancy so that their twins would be born here, they were living with 2 other families in a single wide old run down trailer. The others were also recently arrived illegals -- none had any experience with heating systems and it gets cold in the winter. They had little money because the welfare checks for their newborns weren't coming in yet, so they re-routed the chimney to the bedroom where the family with the newborns was staying and the babies died of carbon monoxide poisoning.

 
Old 06-21-2014, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Mexico and Central America are low-prevalence for Hepatitis B, lower than Alaska and parts of Canada, interestingly.
v04i01p007f02h | NAJMS: The North American Journal of Medicine and Science
 
Old 06-21-2014, 11:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^Mexico and Central America are low-prevalence for Hepatitis B, lower than Alaska and parts of Canada, interestingly.
v04i01p007f02h | NAJMS: The North American Journal of Medicine and Science
You know their record keeping is nothing like ours....right???
 
Old 06-21-2014, 11:53 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,810,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^Mexico and Central America are low-prevalence for Hepatitis B, lower than Alaska and parts of Canada, interestingly.
v04i01p007f02h | NAJMS: The North American Journal of Medicine and Science
And yet, they have much much higher infant and childhood mortality rates. I think it's more from their custom of having children when they are still children themselves and having children when they can't afford them.

Mexico is actually not a bad country to live in. It's got higher obesity rates than even the USA -- but in order to do okay in Mexico, it's best to finish at least their equivalent of high school, marry and have a job before having children. Those who drop out of school there, and start having babies, often 3 or 4 babies while still in their teens aren't as able to join Mexico's growing middle class.
 
Old 06-21-2014, 04:25 PM
 
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Chagas' disease in Mexico.

Chagas' disease in Mexico : The Lancet
 
Old 06-21-2014, 05:48 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldglory View Post
Chagas' disease in Mexico.

Chagas' disease in Mexico : The Lancet
Chagas is fairly difficult to contract and it's mostly associated with shanty-town villages. For those reasons it's pretty unlikely to ever be a major problem here.

Ken
 
Old 06-21-2014, 06:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Chagas is fairly difficult to contract and it's mostly associated with shanty-town villages. For those reasons it's pretty unlikely to ever be a major problem here.

Ken
Shanty town villages is where most illegals from south of our border come from. From the article - "as many as 30 percent of the people in some isolated communities are living with the disease.
 
Old 06-21-2014, 07:45 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldglory View Post
Shanty town villages is where most illegals from south of our border come from. From the article - "as many as 30 percent of the people in some isolated communities are living with the disease.”
Sure, but it won't spread HERE.
How many shanty towns do you have in YOUR neighborhood? We don't have the right environment for rapid spread of such a disease - even WITH some illegals having it (and the numbers of them who have the disease is at best a "guess"). It's simply not a disease likely to cause much problems here no matter how many illegal immigrants have it. It's not a disease that's easily spread if you live in a decent structure - that's WHY it's mostly found in tropical shanty town locations - and why it will NEVER be a major threat HERE - not to YOU, not to YOUR NEIGHBORS, not to much of ANYONE here in the U.S. If an infected illegal immigrant brings it in, it's not a major threat to anyone else and it will likely not spread any further than the person (or persons) who already have it. Sad for that person or persons, but not a major problem for folks already living here. Making a big deal about the disease is nothing more than the same illogical fear-mongering you folks have been doing all along.

Ken.

Last edited by LordBalfor; 06-21-2014 at 07:55 PM..
 
Old 06-21-2014, 08:01 PM
 
31,837 posts, read 14,662,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Sure, but it won't spread HERE.
How many shanty towns do you have in YOUR neighborhood? We don't have the right environment for rapid spread of such a disease - even WITH some illegals having it (and the numbers of them who have the disease is at best a "guess"). It's simply not a disease likely to cause much problems here no matter how many illegal immigrants have it. It's not a disease that's easily spread if you live in a decent structure - that's WHY it's mostly found in tropical shanty town locations - and why it will NEVER be a major threat HERE - not to YOU, not to YOUR NEIGHBORS, not to much of ANYONE here in the U.S. If an infected illegal immigrant brings it in, it's not a major threat to anyone else and it will likely not spread any further than the person (or persons) who already have it. Sad for that person or persons, but not a major problem for folks already living here. Making a big deal about the disease is nothing more than the same illogical fear-mongering you folks have been doing all along.

Ken.
Contagious: Chagas disease - RightDiagnosis.com

Right, it's just illogical fear mongering.
 
Old 06-21-2014, 08:18 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
18,990 posts, read 21,975,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldglory View Post
Contagious: Chagas disease - RightDiagnosis.com

Right, it's just illogical fear mongering.
Yeah, FEAR MONGERING.

"...There are three basic cycles of transmission for T. cruzi. In the sylvatic (wild) cycle, this organism cycles between wildlife and triatomine insects that live in sylvatic environments. Humans and domesticated animals are infected occasionally when they contact these bugs in the wild. Under some conditions, the insects may also invade houses or outbuildings when they are attracted to light, heat or certain odors, and may contaminate food. Wild triatomine insects can also be transported accidentally to human houses. The sylvatic cycle is responsible for relatively few cases of Chagas disease. It is the only cycle in the U.S...

...T. cruzi is not spread between mammals by casual contact; however, it can be transmitted directly via blood (e.g., in a blood transfusion) and in donated organs. Carnivores can acquire this organism when they eat infected prey. Vertical transmission has been reported in dogs and other animals, both in utero and in the milk. Transmission in milk is very rare in humans, but transplacental transmission can occur at each pregnancy, and during all stages of infection. Laboratory infections usually occur when the parasites contact mucous membranes or broken skin, or are accidentally injected via needlestick injuries, but aerosol transmission might be possible in this setting."


Again, it's a disease that's NOT easily transmitted between people.
Can it happen?
Sure.
Is it LIKELY?
Nope - not at all.
"Possible" is not the same as "Likely".

http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factshe...s_american.pdf

"
...In the United States and in other regions where Chagas disease is now found but is not endemic, control strategies should focus on preventing transmission from blood transfusion, organ transplantation, and mother-to-baby (congenital transmission).

....How do people get Chagas disease?

People can become infected in various ways. In Chagas disease-endemic areas, the main way is through vectorborne transmission. The insect vectors are called triatomine bugs. These blood-sucking bugs get infected by biting an infected animal or person. Once infected, the bugs pass T. cruzi parasites in their feces. The bugs are found in houses made from materials such as mud, adobe, straw, and palm thatch. During the day, the bugs hide in crevices in the walls and roofs. During the night, when the inhabitants are sleeping, the bugs emerge. Because they tend to feed on people's faces, triatomine bugs are also known as "kissing bugs. " After they bite and ingest blood, they defecate on the person. The person can become infected if T. cruzi parasites in the bug feces enter the body through mucous membranes or breaks in the skin. The unsuspecting, sleeping person may accidentally scratch or rub the feces into the bite wound, eyes, or mouth.

People also can become infected through:
congenital transmission (from a pregnant woman to her baby);
blood transfusion;
organ transplantation;
consumption of uncooked food contaminated with feces from infected bugs; and
accidental laboratory exposure.

It is generally considered safe to breastfeed even if the mother has Chagas disease. However, if the mother has cracked nipples or blood in the breast milk, she should pump and discard the milk until the nipples heal and the bleeding resolves.

Chagas disease is not transmitted from person-to-person like a cold or the flu or through casual contact with infected people or animals..."


CDC - Chagas Disease - Detailed FAQs

Let's repeat that last line I quoted from the CDC: "Chagas disease is not transmitted from person-to-person like a cold or the flu or through casual contact with infected people or animals".
What part of that do you NOT understand?

The result of all this is that Chagas will NEVER be a major threat in the U.S. - NEVER. We just don't have the right environment for it.

Ken

Last edited by LordBalfor; 06-21-2014 at 08:28 PM..
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