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Old 04-15-2008, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma(formerly SoCalif) Originally Mich,
13,387 posts, read 9,830,009 times
Reputation: 4611

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sassyone View Post
I thank you for your post. I do agree that Ilegal immigration is a problem, that this government has done nothing about. As you can tell from the amount of posts that neither side can agree. I wish there was a workable solution for all concerned but I doubt that will happen. I wish the ones that have been here for a long time and not causing problems would be allowed to stay, either that or let them come over and
Quote:
work and go home.
We've already tried that, haven't you heard of "The Guest Worker Program? But as usual, it was neglected. they overstayed their work visa's.
Here's an idea...........why don't you go weed out all the do-gooders that you tend to favor so much.
Do this:
Gather them up a tell them that they have an option---if they are so dedicated to working and making a better life, AND to this country, and I mean honest about it, they have 6 months to sign up for citizenship,and assimulation(on their own). Meaning they would either be added to the "Legalization waiting list" or "The Deportartion List".
Now if they're as "nice and honest" as you and some others claim, they will jump at the chance to get their status straightened out.
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Old 04-15-2008, 06:56 PM
 
8,972 posts, read 10,595,493 times
Reputation: 2948
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
We've already tried that, haven't you heard of "The Guest Worker Program? But as usual, it was neglected. they overstayed their work visa's.
Here's an idea...........why don't you go weed out all the do-gooders that you tend to favor so much.
Do this:
Gather them up a tell them that they have an option---if they are so dedicated to working and making a better life, AND to this country, and I mean honest about it, they have 6 months to sign up for citizenship,and assimulation(on their own). Meaning they would either be added to the "Legalization waiting list" or "The Deportartion List".
Now if they're as "nice and honest" as you and some others claim, they will jump at the chance to get their status straightened out.
I've tried reminding folks of the "Bracero Program" too, which was legal, provided lots of jobs, was used by lots of employers, and had the approval of both the US and Mexican governments. It also avoided the anger and frustration of those coming here illegally, thinking they SHOULD be able to stay on indefinitely, then becoming disappointed in finding out they might NOT, and living in 'limbo'. The bracero program made no false promises, yet had plenty of 'takers'.

No one responds, though. My suspicion is that THAT is because we now have more going on here than just people 'wanting to work'.
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Old 04-15-2008, 06:59 PM
 
Location: California
1,267 posts, read 93,160 times
Reputation: 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by macmeal View Post
I've tried reminding folks of the "Bracero Program" too, which was legal, provided lots of jobs, was used by lots of employers, and had the approval of both the US and Mexican governments. It also avoided the anger and frustration of those coming here illegally, thinking they SHOULD be able to stay on indefinitely, then becoming disappointed in finding out they might NOT, and living in 'limbo'. The bracero program made no false promises, yet had plenty of 'takers'.

No one responds, though. My suspicion is that THAT is because we now have more going on here than just people 'wanting to work'.
Another Bracero program would work to our benefit.
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Old 04-15-2008, 07:02 PM
 
1,814 posts, read 1,958,331 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkfarnam View Post
We've already tried that, haven't you heard of "The Guest Worker Program? But as usual, it was neglected. they overstayed their work visa's.
Here's an idea...........why don't you go weed out all the do-gooders that you tend to favor so much.
Do this:
Gather them up a tell them that they have an option---if they are so dedicated to working and making a better life, AND to this country, and I mean honest about it, they have 6 months to sign up for citizenship,and assimulation(on their own). Meaning they would either be added to the "Legalization waiting list" or "The Deportartion List".
Now if they're as "nice and honest" as you and some others claim, they will jump at the chance to get their status straightened out.
And are you also saying that they can become legal without paying the fee's that goes along with being legal? What do gooders are you talking about?
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Old 04-15-2008, 07:02 PM
 
8,972 posts, read 10,595,493 times
Reputation: 2948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exedous View Post
Another Bracero program would work to our benefit.
OK, SOMEBODY responded..... My mistake.
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Old 04-15-2008, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Lake Forest, CA
268 posts, read 506,470 times
Reputation: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by sassyone View Post
And are you also saying that they can become legal without paying the fee's that goes along with being legal?
Whether they can't/want to pay or not should never even be an issue in this matter. People can never justify illegal behavior by saying "I didn't have the money to pay". Taking something or doing something without the money it requires to buy/do something is called stealing. I can't go to the grocery store and steal a banana, get caught, then tell the police, well... my child's hungry, I needed the banana. The cop's going to tell you too bad, find a legal way to get a banana. If you can't do something legally because you have no money, then you shouldn't do it at all.

Don't get me wrong. I really feel for people that are in poorer countries. I'm from the Philippines, and I have family there. I feel real bad about the conditions they're in. I REALLY really do. Believe me, if I can "undo" all the poverty in the world and make it all like the richer/free countries, I would. Unfortunately, laws and some sort of "order" has to be kept to keep things from going to chaos. This applies to any country. (Some are just not as good as others about it)

As far as some other reply I read earlier regarding letting the people stay who's been here longer... Here goes.

It's just like having children... If you give one a piece of candy, you'll have all the others asking for candy. If you don't give it to them, what will you get? A bunch of kids saying "Well, he got one, why can't I get one?" That same thing will happen when you let one "seasoned" immigrant stay, but make the rest leave because they haven't been here as long. And the ones you do let stay, all you're teaching them as a person is that they can do something illegal and get away with it, just because they did it a long time ago. (Murderers from the 80s can't get away with what they did 25 years ago if caught in 2008... why let illegal immigration be different?)

Just like that lady on the news a couple years ago who got deported and separated from her son. It was a HUGE deal on the news. Unfortunately, if she would have never came here illegally, it never would have happened. People say that it's cruel to separate parents from their citizen children and deport them, but by letting them stay, what are you condoning? That they can do what they want and not have consequences. Who's to say they won't do other illegal things here... hey, they got away with one thing, why not do other stuff...

Sorry, not trying to be mean, I just don't like the pick and choose method of anything. (Not only immigration) Things get out of order, things can get biased, and that can lead to lawsuits, complaints, and "it's not fair" mentality. I see this issue as something that needs to be black and white. Either do it or don't. No maybes or sometimes... That turns into chaos... Apparently.
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Old 04-15-2008, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Rosarito Beach
334 posts, read 558,777 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exedous
Another Bracero program would work to our benefit.


Quote:
Originally Posted by macmeal View Post
OK, SOMEBODY responded..... My mistake.
Didn't think you needed a pat on the back! OF COURSE something like that would make sense and be accepted by most everyone
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Old 04-16-2008, 12:56 AM
 
12,544 posts, read 11,924,846 times
Reputation: 2860
Quote:
Originally Posted by sassyone View Post
I do not agree. These people are poor that are crossing the borders. They do not have the time or the money it takes to do it the legal route. If I were desperate to feed my family I would do the same thing.
Economy of Mexico - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The economy of Mexico is the 13th largest in the world,[1] with a gross domestic product (by PPP estimate) that surpassed a trillion dollars in 2004,[2] measured in purchasing power parity.
Mexico has a free market and export-oriented economy and is firmly established as an advanced middle-income country.[3]
According to the World Bank's latest available figure (September 14, 2007), it has the highest income per capita in Latin America, in market exchange rates and the second in purchasing power parity.[4]

Poverty

After the 19941995 economic crisis, probably the most severe in the country's history, 50% of the population fell into poverty.

A rapid growth in exports propitiated by NAFTA and other trade agreements, and the restructuring of the macroeconomic finances initiated during Zedillo's and continued during Fox's administration had significant results in the reduction of the poverty rate: according to the World Bank, poverty was reduced to 17.6% in 2004.[22]

Most of this reduction was achieved in rural communities whose rate of poverty declined from 42% to 27.9% in the 20002004 period, although urban poverty stagnated at 12%.[22]

According to the World Bank, in 2004, 17.6% of Mexico's population lived in extreme poverty, while 21% lived in moderated poverty.[23]

The CIA Factbook, on the other hand, reported that 13.5% of the population was under the poverty line, as measured in food-based poverty.[24]

, or contributions sent by Mexicans living abroad, mostly in the United States, to their families at home in Mexico, are a substantial and growing part of the Mexican economy; they comprised $18 billion in 2005.[25]
In 2004, they became the second largest source of foreign income after crude oil exports, roughly equivalent to foreign direct investment (FDI) and larger than tourism expenditures; and represented 2.5 percent of the nation's Gross Domestic Product.[26]
The growth of remittances has been remarkable: they have more than doubled since 1997. Recorded remittance transactions exceeded 41 million in 2003, of which 86 percent were made by electronic transfer.

Economy of Mexico - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 04-16-2008, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Rosarito Beach
334 posts, read 558,777 times
Reputation: 50
[quote=Miborn;3475707]

contributions sent by Mexicans living abroad, mostly in the United States, to their families at home in Mexico, are a substantial and growing part of the Mexican economy; they comprised $18 billion in 2005.[25]
In 2004, they became the second largest source of foreign income after crude oil exports, roughly equivalent to foreign direct investment (FDI) and larger than tourism expenditures; and represented 2.5 percent of the nation's Gross Domestic Product.[26]

They do not include in these figures the illegal drug trade, which at about $14 billion per year puts it near one of the top revenue producers in Mexico.
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Old 04-16-2008, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Pa
20,178 posts, read 11,284,653 times
Reputation: 6342
[quote=Dave Rosarito;3477804]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miborn View Post

contributions sent by Mexicans living abroad, mostly in the United States, to their families at home in Mexico, are a substantial and growing part of the Mexican economy; they comprised $18 billion in 2005.[25]
In 2004, they became the second largest source of foreign income after crude oil exports, roughly equivalent to foreign direct investment (FDI) and larger than tourism expenditures; and represented 2.5 percent of the nation's Gross Domestic Product.[26]

They do not include in these figures the illegal drug trade, which at about $14 billion per year puts it near one of the top revenue producers in Mexico.
Explains why the Mexican gov facilitates its citizens illegal crossings onto our soil.... Yet another reason we should re-think our trade practices with our neighbor.
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