U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies > Illegal Immigration
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-22-2008, 10:44 AM
 
1,861 posts, read 2,967,216 times
Reputation: 559

Advertisements

The "hispanics" call themselves that, or "latinos" so they can be a special group to get special benefits. Look at "La Raza" and their promotion of illegal immigration for "hispanics - the race". It doesn't seem to matter where they came from.

"Special benefits" are for blacks only, because of America's history with slavery. Just because someone walks over the border and they're "hispanic" should not mean they get special benefits EVER. Even if they're legal. It's only for blacks. It's somehow become twisted and includes this group of "hispanics" who make sure they're known that way, and can therefore get special treatment. It is not MEANT that way. It was NEVER meant that way.

It has nothing to do with being a "special group" - it has to do with blacks and our history in America.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-22-2008, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Sacramento
2,568 posts, read 5,837,600 times
Reputation: 1905
I am Hispanic and white. I would be happy to check white box if it wasn't because it says except of Hispanic origin. I have never tried to get any benefit because I am Hispanic.

Last edited by suzie02; 07-22-2008 at 11:31 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 11:29 AM
 
3,368 posts, read 10,272,188 times
Reputation: 1675
I am white (and identify as Hispanic) as well, and on my college and law school applications I marked "other" and then wrote in "I prefer that my race and/or ethnicity not play a part in my admissions decision; therefore, I decline to specify." I didn't want to receive any benefits I didn't deserve either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,807,269 times
Reputation: 3028
Quote:
Originally Posted by crisp444 View Post
I am white (and identify as Hispanic) as well, and on my college and law school applications I marked "other" and then wrote in "I prefer that my race and/or ethnicity not play a part in my admissions decision; therefore, I decline to specify." I didn't want to receive any benefits I didn't deserve either.
Kudos!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,148 posts, read 36,611,035 times
Reputation: 3785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
Yes, when we think of 'Black' we generally don’t think of countries of origin such as England, France or Germany. I have met people of African descent from all of these countries. It seems strange to hear them speaking with their respective accents, because we are so accustomed to blacks in America.

I had an interesting conversation with a lady from the Dominican Republic. She told me that people are always "mistaking" her for being Black. I had to give her a news flash. I told her I hated to burst her bubble, but she IS Black. I asked her if she thought her Spanish accent somehow changed her skin color. I also told her to look at herself and then look at me. When I brought to her attention the fact that I'm Black, yet my skin is much lighter than hers, she simply walked away.
That is truly sad.

Apparently the White supremacy of Hispanic culture is so great that people who are obviously 'of color' will deny their race (read that Black and Indian especially).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,807,269 times
Reputation: 3028
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaBear View Post
That is truly sad.

Apparently the White supremacy of Hispanic culture is so great that people who are obviously 'of color' will deny their race (read that Black and Indian especially).
It is sad. I was really shocked that she actually didn't consider herself black. Haitians speak French, but that certainly doesn't change the fact that they're black.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,148 posts, read 36,611,035 times
Reputation: 3785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
It is sad. I was really shocked that she actually didn't consider herself black. Haitians speak French, but that certainly doesn't change the fact that they're black.
As you stated.

Especially considering that Haiti and the Dominican Republic share the same small island just S of Florida.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
2,568 posts, read 5,837,600 times
Reputation: 1905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
I had an interesting conversation with a lady from the Dominican Republic. She told me that people are always "mistaking" her for being Black. I had to give her a news flash. I told her I hated to burst her bubble, but she IS Black. I asked her if she thought her Spanish accent somehow changed her skin color. I also told her to look at herself and then look at me. When I brought to her attention the fact that I'm Black, yet my skin is much lighter than hers, she simply walked away.
In the US black means one thing. Basically if you are 50/50 or even 90(white)/10(black) you are considered black. It is kind of if a little of your blood is black you are black. "Black" people who chose to identify themselves as white are said to be "passing". There is a cultural aspect to being black in the US. There are plenty of Indians with dark skin but there are not considered black.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 01:12 PM
 
7,020 posts, read 9,894,200 times
Reputation: 1094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
Yes, when we think of 'Black' we generally don’t think of countries of origin such as England, France or Germany. I have met people of African descent from all of these countries. It seems strange to hear them speaking with their respective accents, because we are so accustomed to blacks in America.

I had an interesting conversation with a lady from the Dominican Republic. She told me that people are always "mistaking" her for being Black. I had to give her a news flash. I told her I hated to burst her bubble, but she IS Black. I asked her if she thought her Spanish accent somehow changed her skin color. I also told her to look at herself and then look at me. When I brought to her attention the fact that I'm Black, yet my skin is much lighter than hers, she simply walked away.
My grandmother had a male co-worker/friend from Cuba. His name was Paul and his nickname for me was "Ms. Cub". Me, Paul and my granny would always to to Cub games together. Even though I was only 6 years old I had such a crush on him, he was gorgeous. He had the most beautiful reddish/dark brown complexion, and stark white hair.

Because I was so young it never occurred to me that he was anything other than black.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2008, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,807,269 times
Reputation: 3028
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzie02 View Post
In the US black means one thing. Basically if you are 50/50 or even 90(white)/10(black) you are considered black. It is kind of if a little of your blood is black you are black. "Black" people who chose to identify themselves as white are said to be "passing". There is a cultural aspect to being black in the US. There are plenty of Indians with dark skin but there are not considered black.
Believe me, as the granddaughter of a white woman, I am very familiar with black people “passing” as white. One of my mother’s sisters lives this life. To this day, her family (husband, children, in-laws) have no idea she is black. She always visits her “black” family alone. I’m not sure what excuse she uses for her family, but she manages to attend weddings, funerals, and other important ‘family’ gatherings. We have all joked about the possibility of her “black” genes eventually surfacing in one of her descendents. Wouldn’t that be a hoot.

Quite frankly, most of my mother’s five siblings could have chosen this path. However, they chose to live the life of Black Americans (one drop rule), and their children run the gamut in skin colors, depending on the complexion of their spouses. My mother married a dark-skinned man; as a result, I am light brown. I have cousins as white as Mariah Carey, yet they also choose to be black. Needless to say, when my family gets together, it’s quite a “colorful” occasion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies > Illegal Immigration
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top