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Old 02-17-2009, 10:43 PM
 
Location: The world, where will fate take me this time?
3,162 posts, read 10,297,320 times
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I was born in Mexico, my parents were born in Mexico, my grand parents too, and before them too, so I'm more Mexican than el chile, yet I'm "white" between quotes, because I find ridiculous to artificially divide people in ethnicities, that usually have nothing to do with culture.

That said, given the fact I can speak english and portuguese with no accent usually confuses people about my nationality.

I also have to say that I like to assimilate and learn things from other cultures, places, for example I'm a Mexican who practices Yoga/Hinduism, I meditate everyday, have a vegetarian diet, like to practice ashtanga regularly, and my core set of values beliefs comes from the 6 schools of Indian phillosophy, although from them Yoga is my darling. So I guess that culturally I'm a mix of everything, yet my core comes from India, but Brazil has a special place in my heart, America has been very important in shaping my thoughts on several subjects, and Mexico will be always the safe haven, the place of my sweetest memories, the place where I met my friends, grew up, shaped my character, made me realize my personal quest, etc.

So I'd say that every person is different, and every person has the ability to create his/her own culture based on life experiences, some people like to be open and receptive, others like to feel good in their confort zone and never try new things, maybe your home country will have some influence regarding your receptiveness, but again the willpower and intuition of a person can be so strong that would override those cultural influences.

I believe that those who have the adaptability to embrace and adopt positive things from other cultures has an edge and an advantage, but that's just my humble opinion.

Regards!
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Old 02-17-2009, 11:00 PM
 
8,973 posts, read 14,615,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelling fella View Post
I was born in Mexico, my parents were born in Mexico, my grand parents too, and before them too, so I'm more Mexican than el chile, yet I'm "white" between quotes, because I find ridiculous to artificially divide people in ethnicities, that usually have nothing to do with culture.

That said, given the fact I can speak english and portuguese with no accent usually confuses people about my nationality.

I also have to say that I like to assimilate and learn things from other cultures, places, for example I'm a Mexican who practices Yoga/Hinduism, I meditate everyday, have a vegetarian diet, like to practice ashtanga regularly, and my core set of values beliefs comes from the 6 schools of Indian phillosophy, although from them Yoga is my darling. So I guess that culturally I'm a mix of everything, yet my core comes from India, but Brazil has a special place in my heart, America has been very important in shaping my thoughts on several subjects, and Mexico will be always the safe haven, the place of my sweetest memories, the place where I met my friends, grew up, shaped my character, made me realize my personal quest, etc.

So I'd say that every person is different, and every person has the ability to create his/her own culture based on life experiences, some people like to be open and receptive, others like to feel good in their confort zone and never try new things, maybe your home country will have some influence regarding your receptiveness, but again the willpower and intuition of a person can be so strong that would override those cultural influences.

I believe that those who have the adaptability to embrace and adopt positive things from other cultures has an edge and an advantage, but that's just my humble opinion.

Regards!
Always interesting, as usual....good reading. "Speaking without an accent" DOES cause confusion, for sure...or even with the WRONG accent. Several times, in the past, working with all-Mexican crews, I was the cause of confusion. My Spanish (they decided), was too rapid and too good for me to be a "gringo" (which I WAS)...my accent was odd...and my coloring was 'guero'...and on SEVERAL occasions, I was simply referred to as 'el argentino'. It was simply 'taken for granted'. I'd 'straighten them out', and we'd laugh..but it would happen again when a new person showed up. I finally gave up, and became 'argentino' to anyone who wanted it that way. (Most of these guys were rural Mexican 'farm boys' and probably had little experience with 'argentinos')

My Spanish DOES have a strange accent, and some of it I learned from childhood friends in the States, while much of it I picked up while working as a Merchant seaman in Argentina, Chile, etc...but I SURE don't sound like a Mexican...

Best of luck to you..
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Old 02-17-2009, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,959,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaBear View Post
In a nutshell: attitudes here in Arizona are quite different as in there are no Irish, Italian, etc. enclaves for Anglo AKA non Hispanic Whites.

For that matter: most people of 'Italian' lineage here with the 'Guido' attitude tend to be from east of the Mississippi River whereas at least SoCal natives of that same ethnicity tend to identify as Americans first.
You're right about SoCal natives - however Bay Area natives would be different. There's very little "Guidoism" in the Bay Area (other than Northeast transplants, despite a long established Italian-American population) but there's still plenty of Irish identification. (Don't know if you remember any of former SF mayor Frank Jordan's rallies and fundraisers, but he gave off an in your face Irish-American attitude befitting a Northeast politician and relished the image of the old "white ethnic" San Francisco that was already in serious decline by the time he became mayor. SF also has the "Irish cop" tradition much more than L.A. ever had) Besides, California Italian-Americans wouldn't have the accent to give off a "mob" type image as percieved by the public at large. While both Northern and Southern California do have Mafia history it pales in comparison to that of the Northeast.

And as I stated that attitude is not unique to Italian-Americans, in L.A. in particular you can find plenty of other white New Yorkers or Jerseyites pretending to have "connections" as it attracts women. The same seems to be true in Vegas. Guess Phoenix is different.
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Old 02-17-2009, 11:21 PM
 
Location: The world, where will fate take me this time?
3,162 posts, read 10,297,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macmeal View Post
Always interesting, as usual....good reading. "Speaking without an accent" DOES cause confusion, for sure...or even with the WRONG accent. Several times, in the past, working with all-Mexican crews, I was the cause of confusion. My Spanish (they decided), was too rapid and too good for me to be a "gringo" (which I WAS)...my accent was odd...and my coloring was 'guero'...and on SEVERAL occasions, I was simply referred to as 'el argentino'. It was simply 'taken for granted'. I'd 'straighten them out', and we'd laugh..but it would happen again when a new person showed up. I finally gave up, and became 'argentino' to anyone who wanted it that way. (Most of these guys were rural Mexican 'farm boys' and probably had little experience with 'argentinos')

My Spanish DOES have a strange accent, and some of it I learned from childhood friends in the States, while much of it I picked up while working as a Merchant seaman in Argentina, Chile, etc...but I SURE don't sound like a Mexican...

Best of luck to you..
Best of luck to you too my friend!
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Old 02-17-2009, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,959,819 times
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Originally Posted by ArizonaBear View Post
And; certain surnames that are usually Spanish can belong to non Hispanic people as well:

Barron sometimes English
Lucas " "
Ayala can be Italian as well as the surname Sacramento
Gomez can be Turkish

etc.
Turks with the last name of Gomez are descended from the Jews who fled Spain due to the Inquisition. Turkish Jews for this reason tend to have Spanish last names. (Not all of these Turkish Jews remained Jewish - Mustafa Kemal Ataturk was descended from Sephardic Jews who had later converted to Islam.)

Peter Sellers was an English Jew, and his mother's maiden name was Mendoza - his family were descended from Jews who'd left Spain centuries ago (including the late 18th/early 19th century bare-knuckle boxer Daniel Mendoza, the first Jew to be granted an audience with a British monarch, George III, and the Joe Louis or Jackie Robinson of his time in a way)

Remember that Spain ruled a great deal of Italy for centuries and so Spanish names can be found in parts of Italy. Not to mention that both nations have languages based on Latin and share the heritage of the Roman Empire.

You didnt even mention how many Portuguese surnames are similar to Spanish surnames.

Speaking of this subject, Australia had a Latin American immigrant as prime minister in the early 20th century, Chris Watson, Chilean by birth.
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Old 02-17-2009, 11:30 PM
 
8,973 posts, read 14,615,066 times
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Originally Posted by majoun View Post
Turks with the last name of Gomez are descended from the Jews who fled Spain due to the Inquisition. Turkish Jews for this reason tend to have Spanish last names. (Not all of these Turkish Jews remained Jewish - Mustafa Kemal Ataturk was descended from Sephardic Jews who had later converted to Islam.)

Peter Sellers was an English Jew, and his mother's maiden name was Mendoza - his family were descended from Jews who'd left Spain centuries ago (including the late 18th/early 19th century bare-knuckle boxer Daniel Mendoza, the first Jew to be granted an audience with a British monarch, George III, and the Joe Louis or Jackie Robinson of his time in a way)

Remember that Spain ruled a great deal of Italy for centuries and so Spanish names can be found in parts of Italy. Not to mention that both nations have languages based on Latin and share the heritage of the Roman Empire.

You didnt even mention how many Portuguese surnames are similar to Spanish surnames.

Speaking of this subject, Australia had a Latin American immigrant as prime minister in the early 20th century, Chris Watson, Chilean by birth.
Interesting discussion. I've noticed over the years several Portuguese names among public officials in India...a legacy, I ASSUME, of the former colony of Goa. Seems like one high Indian official a few years back had the name "da Silva"..and I THINK there was a "Rodrigues"....not normally thought of as stereotypically Indian surnames...several others, too.
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Old 02-18-2009, 02:57 AM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,959,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macmeal View Post
Interesting discussion. I've noticed over the years several Portuguese names among public officials in India...a legacy, I ASSUME, of the former colony of Goa. Seems like one high Indian official a few years back had the name "da Silva"..and I THINK there was a "Rodrigues"....not normally thought of as stereotypically Indian surnames...several others, too.
There are quite a few mestizos from Goa, such as Miss India 2007, Sarah Jane Dias:

File:MIss India 07 Sarah Jane Dias.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 02-18-2009, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,148 posts, read 36,622,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
There are quite a few mestizos from Goa, such as Miss India 2007, Sarah Jane Dias:

File:MIss India 07 Sarah Jane Dias.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
And; you are 100% correct

I had to smile at your use of the word 'Mestizo': E Indians are most definitely not Hispanic unless born/raised in a Hispanic nations.

In fact: to run with your ball further; The Gypsies/Roma of especially Eastern Europe are (mostly) descended from E Indians as well-----------DNA testing proved that. I have a friend of mine; who is obviously Mestizo despite being counted as 100% Anglo White here in Arizona......she is either 1/2 or full Hungarian lineage but we look nothing alike. Note I am also 1/2 Hungarian (Szekler which are closer to Scots-Irish/Celt) but am Nordic White in appearance whereas the 'Jersey Devil' (she is a NJ native) has dark hair/eyes, high cheekbones, slanted eyes with the epicanthic folds, etc.
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Old 02-18-2009, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,813,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaBear View Post
And; certain surnames that are usually Spanish can belong to non Hispanic people as well:

Barron sometimes English
Lucas " "
Ayala can be Italian as well as the surname Sacramento
Gomez can be Turkish

etc.
So true. There's nothing like being "Hispanic" with a French surname.
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Old 02-18-2009, 02:16 PM
 
Location: The world, where will fate take me this time?
3,162 posts, read 10,297,320 times
Reputation: 1423
Quote:
Originally Posted by macmeal View Post
Interesting discussion. I've noticed over the years several Portuguese names among public officials in India...a legacy, I ASSUME, of the former colony of Goa. Seems like one high Indian official a few years back had the name "da Silva"..and I THINK there was a "Rodrigues"....not normally thought of as stereotypically Indian surnames...several others, too.
I believe you are speaking of George Fernandes the defense minister of India, his name isn't very indian huh? but he looks very indian

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