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Old 02-01-2009, 02:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UB50 View Post
This isn't true. My grandparents immigrated here legally and never learned English (though this was 100 years ago). We get immigrants here now (Iraq for one) who don't speak English and they are legal immigrants.

People may learn English because it makes life easier but there is no law that says they have to learn English to be a legal immigrant here.
100 years ago is a very long time, yet even then those who came here motivated themselves to speak English or otherwise remained in hiding from the embarrassment of not being able to do so.

That being said while I made no mention that there is a law in place, there is but there are exceptions in some cases. Those requesting permission to come into this country LEGALLY are required to at least speak basic English.

Quote:
General Naturalization Requirements for U.S. Citizenship


Juma Kennedy from Tanzania works on his spelling in a Kansas City, Missouri, classroom. (© AP Images)



Age
With certain exceptions, applicants must be at least 18 years old.
Residency
An applicant must have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence. Lawfully admitted for permanent residence means having been legally accorded the privilege of residing permanently in the United States as an immigrant in accordance with the immigration laws.
Residence and Physical Presence
An applicant is eligible to file if, immediately preceding the filing of the application, he or she:
• has been lawfully admitted for permanent residence (see preceding section);
• has resided continuously as a lawful permanent resident in the United States for at least five years prior to filing with no single absence from the United States of more than one year;
• has been physically present in the United States for at least 30 months out of the previous five years;
• has resided within a state or district for at least three months.
Good Moral Character
Generally, an applicant must show that he or she has been a person of good moral character for the statutory period (typically five years, but three years for an applicant married to a U.S. citizen or one year for an applicant serving in the U.S. Armed Forces) prior to filing for naturalization. An applicant is permanently barred from naturalization if he or she has ever been convicted of murder or aggravated felony. A person also cannot be found to be a person of good moral character if during the past five years he or she has been convicted of a number of other crimes.
Attachment to the Constitution
An applicant must show that he or she is attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States.
Language
With certain exceptions, applicants for naturalization must be able to read, write, speak, and understand words in ordinary usage in the English language.
General Naturalization Requirements for U.S. Citizenship
Next time, check your facts before hurling false accusations.
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Old 02-01-2009, 02:59 PM
 
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I live in an area where the population is predominantly Armenian, Spanish, Korean and American. There are large groups of people (tens of thousands) who read and speak Korean, Spanish, Russian, Farsi and Armenian -- oh! And English. Signs at the supermarket can be in any combination of those languages though I must admit, one never sees signs in Armenian and Korean without an English version of the wording.

Is there a common language? Yes. That would be English.

Everyone doesn't speak English, but everyone knows someone who does. The stores around here hire a multitude of people who speak a variety of languages. It's really the only way to survive.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:02 PM
 
9,716 posts, read 12,940,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDubsMom View Post
100 years ago is a very long time, yet even then those who came here motivated themselves to speak English or otherwise remained in hiding from the embarrassment of not being able to do so.

That being said while I did not state there was a law in place, while there is an exception in some cases. Those those requesting permission to come into this country LEGALLY are required to at least speak basic English.




Next time, check your facts before hurling false accusations.
Legal resident does not equal citizenship. You can be a legal resident of the USA without having US Citizenship.

Green card holders are legal residents and not citizens.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by that1guy View Post
No they weren't. My great grandmother spoke Yiddish only. My former teacher from New Orleans, her grandmother speaks only French. Pensylvania Dutch (German). Lots of German and Slavic immigrants did not speak English. Really, it doesn't affect me. If somebody whispers into another person's ear, and if the outcome doesn't affect me...then why bother?
You like the poster before you have no clue what the requirements are for LEGAL IMMIGRATION to the US. Simply put, publicly speaking anything other than the native language in a host country is rude. Pretending it doesn't matter and remaining in and not attempting to learn the native language of a host country is not only rude but simply magnifies that you are rude and down right ignorant.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UB50 View Post
Legal resident does not equal citizenship. You can be a legal resident of the USA without having US Citizenship.

Green card holders are legal residents and not citizens.

Please, stop highjacking the thread. Even if you are here as a legal resident it is still required that you at least speak and understand basic English.

Whether you are a guest worker, legal resident or applying for citizenship, it is still part of the process.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:14 PM
 
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JDubsMom:

You are confusing CITIZENSHIP with living in this country legally. Plenty of people come to this country legally -- to live -- without ever becoming US CITIZENS.

There are loads of ways to come to this country and live here legally. You can work for an international company and have the company transfer you here. You can come here as an investor and live here. You can have a US company hire you (because you have a specialized skill) and live here while you work for the company. All you need is a Green Card. That Green Card gives you a legal right to live here. You do NOT have to become a US citizen.

Permanent residence (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Permanent Resident (Green Card)

There is no English language requirement to get a Green Card.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:19 PM
 
9,716 posts, read 12,940,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDubsMom View Post
Please, stop highjacking the thread. Even if you are here as a legal resident it is still required that you at least speak and understand basic English.

Whether you are a guest worker, legal resident or applying for citizenship, it is still part of the process.
My original point was that the story the OP posted, well, those two "illegals" could have been legal since they've lived here long enough to have been covered under one of the 20th Century Amnesty agreements. Then there would be no point to this thread at all.

Didn't anyone else find it unusual that her 3-year olds are in school already? (Because, according to the article, they get subsidized lunches in school.) What states have school for 3-year olds?
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by that1guy View Post
I speak French with my mother in public sometimes. People simply ask what language, I tell them. If they ask what I'm saying I politely give them the gist. Other times, it might be a personal matter that must be discussed immediately. So it depends.
I mentioned absolutely nothing about people speaking a foreign language in public. I mentioned speaking a foreign language while in the company of those unable to understand the language. There’s quite a difference between a group of coworkers speaking a foreign language, and groups of strangers standing in the grocery store line.

What strangers discuss in public among themselves, be it in English, Spanish, or whatever, is of no interest to me, and I doubt if anyone else gives a flying fig. I would never ask strangers engaged in a private conversation in a public setting what they were discussing. It would be none of my business.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:26 PM
 
7,020 posts, read 9,895,366 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UB50 View Post
JDubsMom:

You are confusing CITIZENSHIP with living in this country legally. Plenty of people come to this country legally -- to live -- without ever becoming US CITIZENS.

There are loads of ways to come to this country and live here legally. You can work for an international company and have the company transfer you here. You can come here as an investor and live here. You can have a US company hire you (because you have a specialized skill) and live here while you work for the company. All you need is a Green Card. That Green Card gives you a legal right to live here. You do NOT have to become a US citizen.

Permanent residence (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Permanent Resident (Green Card)

There is no English language requirement to get a Green Card.
For the record, you are confused and have hijacked the topic. I was NOT talking about Green Cards, nor did I state that you HAD TO BECOME A CITIZEN if you obtained one. I was talking about illegal aliens who come here and don't speak a word of English and those who are citizens or here legally who rudely speak other languages in public.

Additionally, just an FYI Wikipedia is not a reputable source. No offense but your comprehension skills leave a lot to be desired.
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Old 02-01-2009, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,809,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UB50 View Post
My original point was that the story the OP posted, well, those two "illegals" could have been legal since they've lived here long enough to have been covered under one of the 20th Century Amnesty agreements. Then there would be no point to this thread at all.

Didn't anyone else find it unusual that her 3-year olds are in school already? (Because, according to the article, they get subsidized lunches in school.) What states have school for 3-year olds?
They could have, but they didn't even apply. Ergo, they remain illegal aliens.

Quote:
Justina, who came to the U.S. with Magdaleno, applied for legal residency under the 1986 amnesty law and is now a U.S. citizen. Magdaleno never applied.
Many states have Head Start programs for pre-school. My son’s school ranges from K-3 (Kindergarten 3 y/o) thru 12.
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