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Old 02-10-2009, 04:21 PM
 
7,020 posts, read 9,898,849 times
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"This is planned for nurses who live in the El Paso-Ciudad Juarez (Mexico) area, who intend to remain in the region but have no chance of pursuing their career," the medical center's head of nursing, Cindy Scout, told Efe.

The program also seeks to increase the number of bilingual nurses, a particularly important factor in regions like El Paso, where 75 percent of the population is Hispanic and where many of the residents only speak Spanish.

"These nurses will understand not just the language of those who only speak Spanish, but will also understand the culture of Latinos and, in general, people who live in the area," Scout said.


Latin American Herald Tribune - As Border Towns Get More Violent, Mexico Nurses to be Trained to Work in U.S.

Simply stated, more money being wasted pandering to the illegal aliens who have no right to be here and deserve nothing except to be deported. The insanity lives on . . . . . .
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Old 02-10-2009, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,816,809 times
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Quote:
The courses, which will begin Feb. 20 and will continue for three months, are designed to prepare these nurses to pass the state licensing exams successfully.

"We want hospitals to make use of the knowledge and abilities of Mexican nurses licensed in their own country, but who live in the United States and are out of work because they lack the degree the state requires," the spokeswoman said.

The university is coordinating the program with the Las Palmas and Del Sol medical centers in El Paso that have given UTEP a fund of $100,000 to provide the course.
I'm sure there are no U.S. citizens worthy of this opportunity.
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Old 02-10-2009, 04:41 PM
 
Location: CITY OF ANGELS AND CONSTANT DANGER
5,409 posts, read 11,072,228 times
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where did it mention illegal aliens?

its talking about helping medical professionals who do not have the adequate credentials in this country.

i ve met plenty of former doctors(from the phillipines) who are only nurses here. also many peruvians, iranians, etc etc, who are medical professionals in their home country, but havent begun or completed medical studies here in the US.

i dont see a problem with this. its helping people further their professional development.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JDubsMom View Post
"This is planned for nurses who live in the El Paso-Ciudad Juarez (Mexico) area, who intend to remain in the region but have no chance of pursuing their career," the medical center's head of nursing, Cindy Scout, told Efe.

The program also seeks to increase the number of bilingual nurses, a particularly important factor in regions like El Paso, where 75 percent of the population is Hispanic and where many of the residents only speak Spanish.

"These nurses will understand not just the language of those who only speak Spanish, but will also understand the culture of Latinos and, in general, people who live in the area," Scout said.


Latin American Herald Tribune - As Border Towns Get More Violent, Mexico Nurses to be Trained to Work in U.S.

Simply stated, more money being wasted pandering to the illegal aliens who have no right to be here and deserve nothing except to be deported. The insanity lives on . . . . . .
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Old 02-10-2009, 05:39 PM
 
3,712 posts, read 5,711,852 times
Reputation: 1285
Quote:
Originally Posted by the one View Post
where did it mention illegal aliens?

its talking about helping medical professionals who do not have the adequate credentials in this country.

i ve met plenty of former doctors(from the phillipines) who are only nurses here. also many peruvians, iranians, etc etc, who are medical professionals in their home country, but havent begun or completed medical studies here in the US.

i dont see a problem with this. its helping people further their professional development.
Well honey, I do. And I'll tell you why. We currently have a shortage of RNs in the US. This shortage is not due to the fact that no one wants to be an RN. The main problem is a serious shortage of faculty, educators who are qualified to instruct students who want to be RNs. Qualified applicants, Americans and legal residents, who want to work in the field are turned away because programs can only accept so many students. Since we are unable to provide training to Americans and legal residents who want to be nurses, explain to me why we should be offering nurse's training, this scarce resource, to citizens of Mexico? Does that make any sense to you (it probably does)? Why turn away an American who wants to be a nurse and let someone who is not a citizen into the nursing program?
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Old 02-10-2009, 05:45 PM
 
Location: San Diego
32,802 posts, read 30,052,880 times
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Originally Posted by andreabeth View Post
Well honey, I do. And I'll tell you why. We currently have a shortage of RNs in the US. This shortage is not due to the fact that no one wants to be an RN. The main problem is a serious shortage of faculty, educators who are qualified to instruct students who want to be RNs. Qualified applicants, Americans and legal residents, who want to work in the field are turned away because programs can only accept so many students. Since we are unable to provide training to Americans and legal residents who want to be nurses, explain to me why we should be offering nurse's training, this scarce resource, to citizens of Mexico? Does that make any sense to you (it probably does)? Why turn away an American who wants to be a nurse and let someone who is not a citizen into the nursing program?
Every cent of that grant should be used here. This is just another example of propping up Mexico.
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Old 02-10-2009, 06:37 PM
 
Location: CITY OF ANGELS AND CONSTANT DANGER
5,409 posts, read 11,072,228 times
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im your honey!!! how sweet.

i know plenty of people who are nurses, hopeful nurses and those actively studying to be nurses. that is a job that will always be around.

there are enough programs for them. if we have people who have previous experience in the medical field and would quite possibly require less training, then why not offer it to them. they are already on this side of the border(legally) after all. unless im reading this wrong, wouldnt it be for people who have experience as medical professionals, but not the US certifications to practice? i think that solves the problem of a [supposed] nursing/instructor shortage.

Quote:
Originally Posted by andreabeth View Post
Well honey, I do. And I'll tell you why. We currently have a shortage of RNs in the US. This shortage is not due to the fact that no one wants to be an RN. The main problem is a serious shortage of faculty, educators who are qualified to instruct students who want to be RNs. Qualified applicants, Americans and legal residents, who want to work in the field are turned away because programs can only accept so many students. Since we are unable to provide training to Americans and legal residents who want to be nurses, explain to me why we should be offering nurse's training, this scarce resource, to citizens of Mexico? Does that make any sense to you (it probably does)? Why turn away an American who wants to be a nurse and let someone who is not a citizen into the nursing program?
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Old 02-10-2009, 07:22 PM
 
3,712 posts, read 5,711,852 times
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Originally Posted by the one View Post
im your honey!!! how sweet.

i know plenty of people who are nurses, hopeful nurses and those actively studying to be nurses. that is a job that will always be around.
How nice for you. I am an RN.

Quote:
there are enough programs for them.
Really? BTW, it is like this throughout the entire country.

Quote:
Nevada's medical facilities still feel the pinch from the ongoing nursing shortage, but the problem goes beyond just nurses working in the field.
There's a need in the classrooms as well because fewer nurse professionals are available to train nurses in Nevada. "The fact that we still don't have enough faculty, it limits our ability to address the nursing shortage,'' said Lori Candela, graduate nurse track educator at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who recently secured a federal grant to address the state's nurse educator shortage.

In the meantime some nursing schools in Nevada are turning qualified students away because they don't have the staffing to teach them.
ReviewJournal.com - News - Nursing schools lack faculty


Quote:
if we have people who have previous experience in the medical field and would quite possibly require less training, then why not offer it to them. they are already on this side of the border(legally) after all. unless im reading this wrong, wouldnt it be for people who have experience as medical professionals, but not the US certifications to practice? i think that solves the problem of a [supposed] nursing/instructor shortage.
How do you know they are here legally?

In order to work as a nursing instructor you must have attained a higher degree than the students you are teaching. If you are teaching at a baccalaureate program, you must have a master's degree. If you want to teach at the master's level, you need to have a PhD. Somehow, I doubt that most of the people in this program would qualify.
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Old 02-10-2009, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Maryland
15,179 posts, read 15,816,809 times
Reputation: 3028
Quote:
Originally Posted by the one View Post
im your honey!!! how sweet.

i know plenty of people who are nurses, hopeful nurses and those actively studying to be nurses. that is a job that will always be around.

there are enough programs for them. if we have people who have previous experience in the medical field and would quite possibly require less training, then why not offer it to them. they are already on this side of the border(legally) after all. unless im reading this wrong, wouldnt it be for people who have experience as medical professionals, but not the US certifications to practice? i think that solves the problem of a [supposed] nursing/instructor shortage.
It’s not a “supposed” faculty shortage. Sadly, it’s quite real. So why are these Mexican nurses receiving preferential treatment?

Quote:
Advocates for the nursing profession in Mississippi find themselves a victim of their own success. Last year, Mississippi nursing schools turned away more than 1,600 qualified applicants, because of a shortage of nursing school faculty.
State's nursing schools struggling with dearth of faculty | Health Care > Health Care Professionals from AllBusiness.com (http://www.allbusiness.com/north-america/united-states-mississippi/1096919-1.html - broken link)

Quote:
Jean Wortock, the nursing dean at St. Petersburg College, is worried. With just weeks to go before classes begin, she's short about five instructors and is wondering whether she'll be able to fill the slots in time. "It's a challenge. Finding faculty is a real issue," says Wortock. Meanwhile, prospective nursing students continue to line up hundreds are wait-listed until January 2008, with little hope of starting their studies earlier.
Critical condition | North America > United States from AllBusiness.com (http://www.allbusiness.com/labor-employment/human-resources-personnel-management/11576496-1.html - broken link)

Quote:
SEATTLE - In a little over 10 years from now, there's expected to be a shortage of one million nurses in the United States. One of the problems: a major shortage of people who want to train them.
Nursing schools facing teacher shortage | Top Stories | KING5.com | News for Seattle, Washington (http://www.king5.com/topstories/stories/NW_020209WAB-nursing-shortage-LJ.1090d909.html - broken link)
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Old 02-10-2009, 07:31 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 72,427,088 times
Reputation: 47455
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDubsMom View Post
"This is planned for nurses who live in the El Paso-Ciudad Juarez (Mexico) area, who intend to remain in the region but have no chance of pursuing their career," the medical center's head of nursing, Cindy Scout, told Efe.

The program also seeks to increase the number of bilingual nurses, a particularly important factor in regions like El Paso, where 75 percent of the population is Hispanic and where many of the residents only speak Spanish.

"These nurses will understand not just the language of those who only speak Spanish, but will also understand the culture of Latinos and, in general, people who live in the area," Scout said.


Latin American Herald Tribune - As Border Towns Get More Violent, Mexico Nurses to be Trained to Work in U.S.

Simply stated, more money being wasted pandering to the illegal aliens who have no right to be here and deserve nothing except to be deported. The insanity lives on . . . . . .
americans continue to fail to snatch up the good jobs and thereby give our government the excuse to give away those good jobs to foreigners.
young americans continue to take bodybuilding 101, ethnic studies and italian 101
instead of an easy 3 year jr college RN nursing program (42 units LVN, 30 units RN crossover program ). the sky is cryin
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Old 02-10-2009, 07:32 PM
 
Location: San Diego
32,802 posts, read 30,052,880 times
Reputation: 17694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
It’s not a “supposed” faculty shortage. Sadly, it’s quite real. So why are these Mexican nurses receiving preferential treatment?



State's nursing schools struggling with dearth of faculty | Health Care > Health Care Professionals from AllBusiness.com (http://www.allbusiness.com/north-america/united-states-mississippi/1096919-1.html - broken link)



Critical condition | North America > United States from AllBusiness.com (http://www.allbusiness.com/labor-employment/human-resources-personnel-management/11576496-1.html - broken link)



Nursing schools facing teacher shortage | Top Stories | KING5.com | News for Seattle, Washington (http://www.king5.com/topstories/stories/NW_020209WAB-nursing-shortage-LJ.1090d909.html - broken link)
Because your examples don't have a pro_Mexico spin on them which certain members thrive upon.
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