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Old 06-02-2009, 11:38 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 72,427,088 times
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ask any undoc do you think there should be immigration law in the united states of america.
do you think there should be any sort of law in the united states of america. do you think they should have cops in the united states of america, the answer is always no.
this is america we dont need cops and laws here. why do you think we left mexico?
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Old 06-03-2009, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
5,891 posts, read 12,254,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malamute View Post
Before massive illegal immigration, Mexico didn't have the violence levels it has now. How much of that is due to the broken families, the abandoned children with parents chasing dollars in the USA?
That may be the case for some isolated cases but the vast majority of the violence is happening in border cities and are almost always related to the drug cartels. If you go south of the border states violent crime is almost always very low and much lower than major US cities.
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:52 AM
 
Location: San Diego
32,801 posts, read 30,052,880 times
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Originally Posted by Slig View Post
That'd be nice but you're bringing up issues that are currently handled between several different agencies that for the most part aren't on the same page. There would have to be an effective partnership between USCIS, the Department of Labor and the Social Security Administration. Historically these departments fumble around accountability and as a result little gets resolved.
Regardless, I have yet to see where we don't have available labor that already exists, even if the businesses have to pay a living wage to fill it's head count. By passing the existing system is a very bad idea.
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Old 06-03-2009, 03:22 PM
 
709 posts, read 1,542,049 times
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Quote:
South Minneapolis would be devastated if those people weren't there and it'd probably go back into the crime and prositition-filled slum it was back in the 1970's and 80's.

Yeah because neighborhoods with a large number of illegal immigrants have little to no crime, prostitution, and gang activity correct ?


Illegal immigrants actually help increase the property value of neighborhoods they move into in large numbers correct ?
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Old 06-03-2009, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
5,891 posts, read 12,254,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John McClane View Post
Yeah because neighborhoods with a large number of illegal immigrants have little to no crime, prostitution, and gang activity correct ?


Illegal immigrants actually help increase the property value of neighborhoods they move into in large numbers correct ?
In this case the Hispanic population came and reinvested in a blighted part of town and it is now a revitalized and flourishing commercial corridor. Crime has gone steadily down in South Minneapolis neighborhoods since the mid 90's and it's actually a pretty cool area now. I really couldn't give accurate figures on the breakdown of documented vs. undocumented but I would guess that alot of the contributers to this rennassaince have no legal right to reside and/or work in the US. Of course there is some crime but it's definitely less than it was back when there were hardly any Hispanics in the area.
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Old 06-04-2009, 05:34 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,602 posts, read 31,161,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slig View Post
I understand that many people living in states bordering Mexico have a much different perspective and that tends to mold their opinion of the issue differently than somebody who lives in a state that is far less affected from a cultural and financial standpoint. In my own personal experiences I've seen alot of good come out of immigration (legal and illegal) along with some bad things. It is pretty obvious that almost nobody is happy with the current system and how it deals with immigration. I think that is why these discussions can be useful. We obviously have strongly contrasting opinions but we all believe that something needs to be done.
It is easy to be high and mighty in Minnesota, try living in a border state sometime.

The Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR): Costs of Illegal Immigration to Texans: Executive Summary
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Old 06-04-2009, 05:57 AM
 
12,870 posts, read 12,775,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slig View Post
In this case the Hispanic population came and reinvested in a blighted part of town and it is now a revitalized and flourishing commercial corridor. Crime has gone steadily down in South Minneapolis neighborhoods since the mid 90's and it's actually a pretty cool area now. I really couldn't give accurate figures on the breakdown of documented vs. undocumented but I would guess that alot of the contributers to this rennassaince have no legal right to reside and/or work in the US. Of course there is some crime but it's definitely less than it was back when there were hardly any Hispanics in the area.
there are unintended consequences of allowing illegal hispanics to buy homes:

“The effects of the sub-prime crisis are wide-ranging and serious, and it is important that we work to address them in a timely and effective manner,” Coleman said. He said the forum is providing a chance to discuss ways we can assist those in trouble today and avoid similar situations in the future. Senator Coleman said that Minnesota is currently tied for fourth in the nation in the percentage of sub-prime mortgages in foreclosure – with over 4,000 foreclosures in the third quarter alone. In the past year, there has been a 152 percent increase in foreclosures.

i wouldn't exactly call that a renaissance.....

now minnesota is getting a taxpayer funded bailout with housing and exactly how long do you think that will last?
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Old 06-04-2009, 06:19 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,722,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjester View Post
Former Fed Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said, “There is little doubt that illegal, immigration has made a significant contribution to the growth of our economy,” and many top economists agreed with him. So contrary to common belief, the illegals are a big plus to the economy and we all must admit that. Unless you can intelligenty refute what top dog economist are saying, then you should consider applying to the fed Reserve or the Treasury dpt. Somehow, I get the feeling that people who hate the illegals can't compete with the them.
I think many of us believe there is a direct connection with out-of-control immigration and the economy. It's certainly a mess isn't it. California in particular.
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Old 06-04-2009, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
5,891 posts, read 12,254,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floridasandy View Post
there are unintended consequences of allowing illegal hispanics to buy homes:

“The effects of the sub-prime crisis are wide-ranging and serious, and it is important that we work to address them in a timely and effective manner,” Coleman said. He said the forum is providing a chance to discuss ways we can assist those in trouble today and avoid similar situations in the future. Senator Coleman said that Minnesota is currently tied for fourth in the nation in the percentage of sub-prime mortgages in foreclosure – with over 4,000 foreclosures in the third quarter alone. In the past year, there has been a 152 percent increase in foreclosures.

i wouldn't exactly call that a renaissance.....

now minnesota is getting a taxpayer funded bailout with housing and exactly how long do you think that will last?
That's statewide statistics based on 4 million people and says very little of my neighborhood of 6,000. The foreclosure crisis was caused by a combination of investors who overshot their capabilities and based their investments on rapid appreciation and high returns and predatory loaning. I'm not really sure how this ties in with my statement.

The South Minneapolis neighborhoods actually weren't hit as hard by the foreclosure crisis as other parts of the city and the suburbs.
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Old 06-07-2009, 02:16 AM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
147 posts, read 186,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slig View Post
Where do you have this data, are you a social worker? At least in my state poor white citizens from the outskirts and rural areas eat up more wellfare money than any other group of people and it isn't close. I don't know a single undocumented individual who is getting welfare benefits. They don't have the documentation necessary to apply for that type of aid, either that or they are too afraid of exposing themselves. I do know quite a few undocumented people who pay for third party medical insurance which means they aren't using assisted healthcare. You all seem to paint this picture of undocumented worker's as being some kind of blood sucking parasite and most really aren't anything like that.

I'm not a social worker, however I did work for the Department of Human Resources in New York. I interviewed plenty of 'undocumented' people who were not applying for benefits for themselves, in that aspect you're right, BUT and it's a big but, their children are entitled to any and all benefits that you could possibly think of. So your arguement does not hold any water. These people absolutely do suck the system dry and any tax tht you could implement could not come close to the number of social services that they recieve. I think you really need to rethink your comments..
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