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Old 05-28-2009, 07:31 PM
 
Location: The Shires
2,257 posts, read 1,732,000 times
Reputation: 1050

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocexpo View Post
I visited Disneyland on May 16th for the first time in 22 years (since I was a child). I have never been so irritated in my life as the day I went there. First off, the tickets cost $94. And when I got into the park, NOBODY spoke english. You would have thought this was Disneyland Mexico! It was utterly unbelievable. The people at the park were sooooo rude (mainly the ones that spoke only spanish)...trying to wedge their 20 kids in front of me and my niece, cutting, one married family man hit my wifes butt, and said "lo siento" and laughed. We got so many dirty and awkward looks from some people as if we were a strange breed in some foreign country.

I just couldn't believe how some of these families, who had 5+ kids, could afford to drop $500 on a trip to Disneyland. This park was, no joke, almost ALL spanish speakers (not just hispanics or other legal citizens whom I dont have a problem with, but people who literally spoke no english). I asked one of the older men (he worked as an information man) about it, and he said that Disney forces him to take classes at the local community college in order to learn spanish to cater to the almost 100% spanish speaking population at Disneyland, and that new employee's are almost required to speak spanish to be in serious contention for a job.

I was wondering if all parks in the Southwest and Texas are like this. I just didn't think these people, who speak no english and work extrememly low paying jobs, could afford to take a day at Disneyland.

Is there anyone else out there who has visited the Disney park recently and knows what I am talking about? It was the most miserable experience and I hope I don't ever return.
Disneyland sucks anyway. Next time, head over to FL because we have Disney WORLD, which would swallow Disneyland with a hiccup and burp.

 
Old 05-28-2009, 08:17 PM
 
709 posts, read 1,545,291 times
Reputation: 351
Quote:
I visited Disneyland on May 16th for the first time in 22 years (since I was a child). I have never been so irritated in my life as the day I went there. First off, the tickets cost $94. And when I got into the park, NOBODY spoke english. You would have thought this was Disneyland Mexico! It was utterly unbelievable. The people at the park were sooooo rude (mainly the ones that spoke only spanish)...trying to wedge their 20 kids in front of me and my niece, cutting, one married family man hit my wifes butt, and said "lo siento" and laughed. We got so many dirty and awkward looks from some people as if we were a strange breed in some foreign country.

I just couldn't believe how some of these families, who had 5+ kids, could afford to drop $500 on a trip to Disneyland. This park was, no joke, almost ALL spanish speakers (not just hispanics or other legal citizens whom I dont have a problem with, but people who literally spoke no english). I asked one of the older men (he worked as an information man) about it, and he said that Disney forces him to take classes at the local community college in order to learn spanish to cater to the almost 100% spanish speaking population at Disneyland, and that new employee's are almost required to speak spanish to be in serious contention for a job.

I was wondering if all parks in the Southwest and Texas are like this. I just didn't think these people, who speak no english and work extrememly low paying jobs, could afford to take a day at Disneyland.

Is there anyone else out there who has visited the Disney park recently and knows what I am talking about? It was the most miserable experience and I hope I don't ever return.

I am actually surprised that you saw very few people speaking English at Disneyland considering that park is located in Orange County, and everybody tells me that is the Whitest county in Southern California.
 
Old 05-28-2009, 09:39 PM
 
2,385 posts, read 3,716,446 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by floridasandy View Post
i see nothing wrong with an economic boycott for companies that demand that their employees learn a foreign language in order to have a job. serves them right!
Quote:
Originally Posted by thechicano View Post
But...is that even true?

According to this poster, it is:

Quote:
Originally Posted by JennySquirrel View Post
I used to live by an executive for Universal Studios. He told me that when he first worked for them, they had an English teacher and non English speaking employees COULD take classes if they WANTED to. They were not forced. He said 100% of the employees took advantage of the classes and learned English.

Now he said that 75% of the employees speak Spanish and will not take the classes. So now they have a rule that if you are a manager or if you want to be promoted, you must learn to speak Spanish. So they have a MANDITORY Spanish class.

He said he gets complaints all the time from people because they say the staff was rude,etc. He said he used to love to work there, now he hates going into work. But like he said, his days will be numbered anyway because one by one the executives are being replaced by Latino's.

I wouldn't go to Disney or Universal Studios. I'm not going to pay over $100 to spend a day in a park that the people are rude and I can't understand anyone.

It is ironic that if you travel to Asia, they speak English. They learn it in school and yet in our own country English will soon be a second language.
 
Old 05-28-2009, 09:44 PM
 
2,385 posts, read 3,716,446 times
Reputation: 2395
Funny, a similar discussion was going on in a Disneyland messageboard as far back as 2003.

Spanish Language Safety Messages at Disneyland [Archive] - MousePad
 
Old 05-28-2009, 09:52 PM
 
2,385 posts, read 3,716,446 times
Reputation: 2395
Here's an article on Disney culture - at least the culture that Disney attempts to portray. The OP's experience was different from this, not just with patrons but also staff.

Quote:
Every aspect of the Disneyland amusement park was said to be planned ahead with the energy of one of the Disney animated features, with artists from various productions working on the look and style of the place. Actors from many Disney features appear as the voices of birds, announcers and narrators in the park. But all this wonder hides how extensive the Disney strategic planning really is. When you enter Disneyland, you are actually on the top floor of a gigantic complex of underground facilities with employee facilities, security, garbage collection and other administrative aspects hidden from sight. You don't see garbage stacked outside Disneyland waiting to be picked up. The park has even developed its own nomenclature to insulate gritty details from the public. The operations of Disneyland are mostly merged with that of its sister park, Disney's California Adventure, so both parks, as well as the other Disneyland Resort properties, are managed by one team of senior executives.

Disney marketing strategy permeates the park with Disney brand: mouse-ear silhouette is expressed in the macro (in the shape of the toddler pool for example) and micro (in the bend of the drinking straws and in the weave of the curtain tapestry). Disney works hard at ensuring that each member of its staff is friendly, helpful and personable to a fault.
Basically, people are willing to shill out $94 per person because they are paying for the Disney experience. If someone doesn't get that experience, of course they're going to feel cheated.
 
Old 05-28-2009, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,148 posts, read 36,704,952 times
Reputation: 3785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violett View Post
Here's an article on Disney culture - at least the culture that Disney attempts to portray. The OP's experience was different from this, not just with patrons but also staff.



Basically, people are willing to shill out $94 per person because they are paying for the Disney experience. If someone doesn't get that experience, of course they're going to feel cheated.
Read that a 'Las Vegas' but G rated
 
Old 05-28-2009, 09:59 PM
 
2,385 posts, read 3,716,446 times
Reputation: 2395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reads2MUCH View Post
There has been plenty of conversation on this thread already so I won't try to add much. But I did feel I should address this. I am sure someone has said it already, but when the man said "lo siento", he was saying he was sorry. Now of course that doesn't excuse his family jumping you in line, but atleast he was polite about his accidental indiscretion. And as far as the laugh, most people laugh when in an embarrassing situation like that. I am sure he meant no harm, just embarrassed by his accidentally touching your wife's behind.
It's no big secret that Mexico has a problem with men sexually harassing women.

Quote:
Sex dolls fight Mexican machismo

"Sexual harassment is a crime," reads the printed ad
Mexico's government is using blow-up sex dolls in a new TV campaign against sexual harassment in the workplace.

The ads feature dolls, dressed as secretaries and maids, who have to put up with leering and groping from male colleagues.

Officials say the aim of the campaign is to make clear that women are not sexual objects.

President Vicente Fox acknowledged on Wednesday that Mexico has to do more to overcome widespread machismo.

"Our society still has a long way to go in overcoming hangovers from the past, eradicating prejudice and changing habits," he said.


However, Mr Fox has himself caused offence recently by joking that women were just "washing machines with two legs".

'Degrading'

The launch of the campaign, which also includes billboards and radio ads, coincided with International Women's Day on Wednesday. It is scheduled to run until mid-April.

"No woman should be treated like an object. Sexual harassment is degrading and it's a crime," says a voice-over at the end of the TV ad.

Correspondents say machismo runs deep in Mexico, where it is common for men to have mistresses, and in some cases, set them up in a second home.

Women generally earn less than male colleagues and have fewer opportunities for promotion - inappropriate behaviour toward them is said to be relatively frequent.

Mexican officials have also acknowledged that the country still has a problem with domestic violence against women.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4789144.stm

The domestic violence and seeing women as second class citizens leaks out into how men treat women in public. We'll never know if the man in the OP intended to touch and be disrespectful, but I personally think there's more evidence that suggests the man knew what he was doing and didn't care. It's beyond just being a stereotype. Being disrespectful towards women by grabbing them is the cultural norm.
 
Old 05-28-2009, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Here
10,833 posts, read 11,611,291 times
Reputation: 5928
Quote:
Originally Posted by John McClane View Post
I am actually surprised that you saw very few people speaking English at Disneyland considering that park is located in Orange County, and everybody tells me that is the Whitest county in Southern California.
Uhhh...do you think most of the people attending and/or working at Disneyland are residents of Orange County?
 
Old 05-28-2009, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Beautiful CA
91 posts, read 296,503 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreabeth View Post
Then let me clue you in. This is probably an area that they have in a sense 'taken over' by driving everyone else away with their rude behavior. This goes on all the time. Neighborhoods with stable, long term residents can be turned into a barrio with surprising speed once one or two clown houses open up and the neighbors are driven out. Public parks are also taken over in this manner. Previously a park may have been used by all the residents of a community- a group may have a barbecue, kids are playing softball, old people sitting on benches enjoying the weather and so on. You see, all that changes once mobs of them show up, park their cars on the grass, play music excessively loud and act in an intimidating towards anyone who is not part of their 'group'. They think this is a way of showing how powerful they are although in actuality it demonstrates something quite different.
Truer words couldn't have been spoken. This is especially the case with the local parks here. Sad and aggravating.
 
Old 05-28-2009, 11:36 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,923,592 times
Reputation: 22174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandpointian View Post
Those costs are for reasons that have nothing to do with migrant labour. Fuel costs hit $9/gallon in Europe last year. Our costs remains exceptionally low compared to other developed economies owing mainly to our competition, flexibility and consumerism.
In reality, food prices are only kept somewhat low thanks to machines. Food prices aren't really very low at all. They're a huge chunk of the average family's budget. Illegals aren't keeping food prices low and they are pretty much irrelevant to the price of our food which like you said is more based on fuel costs and other overhead.




Quote:
The relevant question here is: what would happen if all illegals were booted from the country? Last time I checked, Americans do not pick cotton, veggies, fruits, etc. at $5 an hour with no bennies. If they did, i.e. their reservation wage was as low as those of desperately poor and unskilled Mexican labourers (let's hope not), then we would not miss a beat.

Hmm...when was the last time we saw a queue to work the fields? Go back to the era of the Dust Bowl and the Grapes of Wrath....a LONG time ago...
The truth is, there are very few jobs in agriculture. By the government's own figures, there are fewer than 1 million farm workers, (859,000 jobs in 2006 to be exact) and the number of farm workers needed is falling. Many farms are family run and employ family members.

Agricultural Workers (http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos285.htm#outlook - broken link)

Not all farm workers are illegals. In fact only an estimated 25% of them are illegal aliens, many are in fact citizens and many are H2A and H2B visa workers.

If the illegals are kicked out, many will just go back home and do what they did before. Many illegals previously lived in rural areas of Mexico, they did farm work there. If anything, we could up our food imports from Mexico -- that way we could insure the same people are picking the food as now.

It's not the end of the world for us and it's not the end of the world for them, if they return home.
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