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View Poll Results: What do you think of multiple immigrant families occupying a single household?
More Americans should do this! 2 6.90%
Live and let live 7 24.14%
One household should be occupied by one family! 20 68.97%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-01-2010, 01:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the one View Post
well my black culture palces a great deal of emphasis on taking care of our family. come to think of it, so does my hispanic side. multigenerational families abound around here (for whatever reason)!

tell me tho, if its an elder its ok, but not others? i dont need to justify taking in my nephews and niece (CHILDREN!!!) because their folks are indisposed. i do it out of love for the kids. and every now and then a cousin down on their luck TEMPORARILY stays with us.
thats what im saying. that circumstances in families sometimes call for more than 1 family 1 house.

its complex. its not cut and dry. i cnat beleive im even getting into this.
i live in LA. in the more urban part of town. their are social ills at our doorstep. if i can ensure that my kids (inluding my cousins kids) have a safe haven, i will.
It tends to be the Hispanic side of your culture that is more likely to live with many members of extended family under one roof. I am not passing judgement on you or anyone else who chooses those kinds of living arrangements but it isn't for me nor most Americans.

Yes, there is a difference between taking in elderly parents and having able bodied younger extended family members living in one household. Usually elder parents need care and financial support more than the younger ones. Cousins, uncles, etc. are extended family and should have the support of their own parents and kids. There is still a privacy issue when sharing common living quarters and you know it. As far as temporary situations, I have also taken in relatives on a temporary basis but that isn't what we are talking about. We are talking about several extended family members living under one roof for long periods of time or permanently. I think that rather than bringing families together many times it tears them apart because of personality conflicts and too much closeness, etc.
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Old 02-01-2010, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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I do not have an issue with extended family members residing under one roof, assuming the house was built to accommodate all members. However, 15-20 people living in a 2-bedroom apartment is unacceptable, for reasons explained by others on this thread. Nor is it acceptable to have cars parked on lawns, or garages converted into flop houses; at least not in my area.
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Old 02-01-2010, 10:30 PM
 
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Once again, folks, it's not a matter of ethnicity, culture, or even imigration status. Here in the US we have codes...some pretty cut-and-dried, some more 'picky', but ultimately ALL of them designed to make us safe, secure, and healthy. It's a rather 'First World' concept, but without it, we'd suffer.

People (in modern-day America) aren't supposed to "have to" sleep in halls, garages, or screen porches; they're not supposed to have to sleep in rooms without ventilation (as can occur when an existing room is illegally 'divided'); they're not supposed to live among dangling electrical cords plugged into overloaded outlets; cook in bedrooms on hotplates; rely on portable space heaters; or us the backyard (or a bucket) for an 'emergency' latrine because 6 people are waiting for the toilet. They're not supposed to have to sleep beside water heaters, or pass through several bedrooms to exit the house, or sleep on the floor.

Individuals won't get 'in trouble' for this, of course...but property owners could. NOT because of who they are, or how they live...but because such living practices on a large scale are unsanitary, dangerous, and potentially deadly. That's why we have fire codes, electrical codes, plumbing codes, etc.

Believe me, I've had much experience in the need for this. I've seen some REAL 'Hell Holes' occupied in rural areas, by people who had no other option (illegals). But few people would CHOOSE to live this way...and no modern American municipality would condone such overload on the system. It may be tolerated (many things are), but it's not 'good'.
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Old 02-02-2010, 09:31 AM
 
3,536 posts, read 5,080,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benicar View Post
I do not have an issue with extended family members residing under one roof, assuming the house was built to accommodate all members. However, 15-20 people living in a 2-bedroom apartment is unacceptable, for reasons explained by others on this thread. Nor is it acceptable to have cars parked on lawns, or garages converted into flop houses; at least not in my area.
Exaggerate much? I was unable to find the average household size specifically for illegal immigrants. However, I was able to find the numbers for all immigrants and for all Hispanics (both were around 3.5...according to Pew Hispanic, the Census, and recent studies at UC Irvine...all three had different numbers, this is a rough average of those averages). Seeing how illegal immigrants usually fall average in both these segments, it is safe to assume that the illegal immigrant household size is roughly 3.5 people. This is in contrast the average size of American households of 2.6 people. While larger, def. not 15-20 people.
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Old 02-02-2010, 09:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagonut View Post
Just because you like having extended family living in your house isn't the norm for most Americans. I can see pluses and negatives on both sides but mostly negatives expecially when it comes to personal privacy in a nuclear family.
Given the current recession and the high debt burden on young people, Americans are increasingly living in multi-generational families. Esp. in higher cost regions. More earning power than a nuclear family. As for "privacy", this is more a personal metric. Some people I know that live seperate from extended family are in constant contact with them. Other people I know that live with extended families hardly have time to see each other.
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by macmeal View Post
Illegals or not...I don't care WHO you are....as a veteran of many years in the Public Water field in California, overcrowding simply 'tears up' the infrastucture. Having 22 people in a 3-bedroom tract home simply exceeds the DESIGN of the thing...and if it gets to a neighborhood-wide degree, it overloads water lines, sewer lines, the electric grid, everything. There's simply a HUGE difference in a neighborhood with 50 people to the acre, and a similarly-designed neighborhood with 300 people to the acre.

Where does everybody sleep? Where do they dump the trash? Toilets and showers wear out...electrical switches and water meters wear out...doorknobs wear out...lawns are used as parking lots...garages are turned into 'rental units'....a suburban neighborhood simply isn't DESIGNED to house triple or quadruple it's 'target' population. What happens across town, when a 25-MGD (Million gallons per Day) Sewage treatment plant begins to receive 40 MGD?....I can tell you...YUCK !!

In ONE house...it's 'doable', maybe. But when an entire neighborhood gets this strained? Things begin to 'age' and deteriorate prematurely...and the immigration status of the residents is quite beside the point. The plain fact is that people 'put a strain' on an infrastructure.....but FIVE TIMES that number will 'tear it up'.

We have 'zoning laws' not to butt into people's private lives, but because without them, things break down. I've seen it in action, for many years. It's not about illegals..it's about the 'load on the system'.

It's also a fire hazard:

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont....4a6484c8.html
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:21 AM
 
Location: ...at a 3AM epiphany
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I've seen a flux of combining household incomes to purchase a larger house for all, re: in-law suites and added bedrooms for some temporarily displaced.
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by getout View Post
I've seen a flux of combining household incomes to purchase a larger house for all, re: in-law suites and added bedrooms for some temporarily displaced.
Here in Calif. until the housing bust they started building 5 and 6 and even 7 bedroom tract homes. Hmm. How many single families really require that much space?
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagonut View Post
Here in Calif. until the housing bust they started building 5 and 6 and even 7 bedroom tract homes. Hmm. How many single families really require that much space?
1 for the parents, 3 for the kids, 1 for grandma, 1 as a home office/books and 1 as a guest room = 7
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Old 02-02-2010, 10:45 AM
 
Location: ...at a 3AM epiphany
2,206 posts, read 2,139,346 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagonut View Post
Here in Calif. until the housing bust they started building 5 and 6 and even 7 bedroom tract homes. Hmm. How many single families really require that much space?
There is a way to live in a healthy "combined house" by following the regulations. Usually a two party household will hold two separate living areas to save space and energy by not having to run two full homes thereby sharing the expense. Like in law suites, and you can care for an ailing family member as well as maintain their privacy.

Stuffing 15-20 people in any confined area is a health hazard all the way around and building enormous places is a way to subsidize illegal housing, for sure. I doubt those houses would only hold those alotted according to regulations as they don't follow those regulations now. It will be just more space for them to cram/hide more people continuing the creation of unhealthy unsafe houses.

Last edited by getout; 02-02-2010 at 11:07 AM..
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