U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies > Illegal Immigration
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 05-17-2014, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,025,929 times
Reputation: 601

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinman01 View Post
The standard should be that before any illegal can even be considered for any form of VISA in the future that they should be held to the same standard to which we hold legals. The exact same standards and requirements...
Like I said, this doesn't make sense. Typically the only way they are coming back or staying to "legalize" is being married to a U.S. citizen, many times with a three year or ten year ban. Put in that native environment (my friend "Emi" states that Ray isn't learning English in Juarez) they can't assimilate as well. Are you saying that you are open to any former illegal alien returning? Many of your colleagues here said as much, then object to the notion when questioned further.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinman01 View Post
...The consulate in Thailand. Part of the interview was to demonstrate that there was an actual history of correspondence between us. Her interview was in English. No option. That was to demonstrate that we were able to communicate effectively with each other. I had no issue with it, nor did my wife. Which oath? Citizenship? There were 80 people in the group from 34 countries. Should they conduct the oath 34 times?
It wasn't a mass oath (nor for naturalization, my wife has been eligible for that over three years, which is disconcerting to some here), and if the busiest U.S. Consulate in the world (Ciudad Juarez) conducts them, it isn't a matter of numbers or nationalities. At Ciudad Juarez they try to deliberately exclude the U.S. citizen spouse/fiance(e), I got access using my military ID, and was able to sit with my family when their IVs were issued, and we all took the oath in English.

Which was interesting with an eight-year old, that had started school in the United States (under her K-4 visa) only a semester before. But back to the point (and topic), we don't typically screen immigrants for English use, it sounds like it was more of a matter that the interviewer didn't believe your relationship (which happens quite a bit to white guys and gals finding a spouse in a "brown" country). It isn't about the intending immigrant being able to carry a marriage, as the K-3 interview with my wife focused much more on the ex-husband she hadn't seen in more than six years, rather than me.

 
Old 05-17-2014, 02:53 PM
 
31,942 posts, read 14,727,274 times
Reputation: 8518
I see, so white Americans with a foreign "brown" spouse are being discriminated against. Gotcha. What the heck is a "brown" country anyway? To my knowledge just about every country has citizens of all colors. Hispanics from another country whom many are brown though probably are the largest group here married to an American citizen. They are probably the group with the least discrimination against them.
 
Old 05-17-2014, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,025,929 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldglory View Post
I see, so white Americans with a foreign "brown" spouse are being discriminated against. Gotcha. What the heck is a "brown" country anyway? To my knowledge just about every country has citizens of all colors. Hispanics from another country whom many are brown though probably are the largest group here married to an American citizen. They are probably the group with the least discrimination against them.
You're headed off under some tangent again. "tinman01" related that the interviewer perceived his relationship was not legitimate, because they wanted to make sure that she was able to communicate with him (maybe he didn't know enough Thai at that time, or they thought he didn't, or was incapable from learning it when he visited his wife's home country). My wife went an interview lively enough that the interviewer felt the need to throw our packet of papers at her across the table, scattering them, because she couldn't answer where her "husband" (not me, but the man that abandoned their marriage seven years earlier in Mexico) was.

I don't think that happens as much to intending immigrants that are white, or do you dispute that as well?...
 
Old 05-17-2014, 05:22 PM
 
31,942 posts, read 14,727,274 times
Reputation: 8518
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
You're headed off under some tangent again. "tinman01" related that the interviewer perceived his relationship was not legitimate, because they wanted to make sure that she was able to communicate with him (maybe he didn't know enough Thai at that time, or they thought he didn't, or was incapable from learning it when he visited his wife's home country). My wife went an interview lively enough that the interviewer felt the need to throw our packet of papers at her across the table, scattering them, because she couldn't answer where her "husband" (not me, but the man that abandoned their marriage seven years earlier in Mexico) was.

I don't think that happens as much to intending immigrants that are white, or do you dispute that as well?...
Yes, I do. If it were a white European that couldn't answer where her husband was I would think the same thing would happen. But then I don't have a victim mentality for any race or ethnic group. Until one can prove that Mexicans in general are being discriminated against in this manner then one doesn't have a leg to stand on. It's a case by case situation and the interviewer has his reasons for doing what they do. One shouldn't imply that it was necessarily discrimination.

Why are we discussing our personal lives in here again especially when it has to do with legal immigration, not illegal immigration? Is there any way to get back on topic?
 
Old 05-17-2014, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Jacurutu
5,302 posts, read 4,025,929 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldglory View Post
Yes, I do. If it were a white European that couldn't answer where her husband was I would think the same thing would happen. But then I don't have a victim mentality for any race or ethnic group. Until one can prove that Mexicans in general are being discriminated against in this manner then one doesn't have a leg to stand on. It's a case by case situation and the interviewer has his reasons for doing what they do. One shouldn't imply that it was necessarily discrimination.

Why are we discussing our personal lives in here again especially when it has to do with legal immigration, not illegal immigration? Is there any way to get back on topic?
I didn't imply that Mexicans were being discriminated against, the wife of "tinman01" is Thai. Interviewers can be female (it seems like the State Department prefers it sometimes; all of the interviews with my wife were conducted by women). The implied titling of this thread is that Hispanics (whether illegal or legal) aren't learning English, which don't match for my personal experiences, but we're off into perception land again.
 
Old 05-17-2014, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Pa
20,310 posts, read 18,941,176 times
Reputation: 6517
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Like I said, this doesn't make sense. Typically the only way they are coming back or staying to "legalize" is being married to a U.S. citizen, many times with a three year or ten year ban. Put in that native environment (my friend "Emi" states that Ray isn't learning English in Juarez) they can't assimilate as well. Are you saying that you are open to any former illegal alien returning? Many of your colleagues here said as much, then object to the notion when questioned further.



It wasn't a mass oath (nor for naturalization, my wife has been eligible for that over three years, which is disconcerting to some here), and if the busiest U.S. Consulate in the world (Ciudad Juarez) conducts them, it isn't a matter of numbers or nationalities. At Ciudad Juarez they try to deliberately exclude the U.S. citizen spouse/fiance(e), I got access using my military ID, and was able to sit with my family when their IVs were issued, and we all took the oath in English.

Which was interesting with an eight-year old, that had started school in the United States (under her K-4 visa) only a semester before. But back to the point (and topic), we don't typically screen immigrants for English use, it sounds like it was more of a matter that the interviewer didn't believe your relationship (which happens quite a bit to white guys and gals finding a spouse in a "brown" country). It isn't about the intending immigrant being able to carry a marriage, as the K-3 interview with my wife focused much more on the ex-husband she hadn't seen in more than six years, rather than me.
K1 Visa Interview Requirements and Checklist | MrsPresson.com | US I-129F Petition, K1 Fiancé(e) Visa, & AOS Guides | Life As Mrs. Presson
go to number 11 on the checklist.
You will notice the requirement for correspondence documentation. The interview was done in english and they explained why. To verify the applicant could speak english....
I just talked to my wife. I wasn't there for the final interview. It was done in english, no options were given for using Thai.
This forum is in regards to illegals, the thread , should hispanics be required to speak english. In this context It makes perfect sense to require illegals to under go the same level of scrutiny as we put legals like your wife and mine through. In fact they should have to jump through even more hoops because they have already disregarded our immigration laws.
So what exactly do you mean when you refer to me as a POD? Because I recognized a personal attack? I play fair and civil and I expect the same in return. post 11018 topic people. You didn't seem to mind when I reported personal attacks against you in regard to your family.

Last edited by tinman01; 05-17-2014 at 07:08 PM..
 
Old 05-17-2014, 07:01 PM
 
31,942 posts, read 14,727,274 times
Reputation: 8518
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
I didn't imply that Mexicans were being discriminated against, the wife of "tinman01" is Thai. Interviewers can be female (it seems like the State Department prefers it sometimes; all of the interviews with my wife were conducted by women). The implied titling of this thread is that Hispanics (whether illegal or legal) aren't learning English, which don't match for my personal experiences, but we're off into perception land again.
Then what were you implying? Never mind, let's get back on topic. Many "immigrant" Hispanics do learn English but what I have observed is that they don't want to speak it in public. It's not a perception it is what I see and hear. I have heard them switch to English with ease from Spanish when they had to. They never seem to want to make English their primary language of usage in public. It's a non-assimilation factor to "me". Sorry, if you don't agree. I don't wish to banter back and forth about this either because you won't change my mind on how I feel about it or view it. Sometimes I feel I am living in Mexico rather than the U.S.
 
Old 05-17-2014, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Pa
20,310 posts, read 18,941,176 times
Reputation: 6517
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
I didn't imply that Mexicans were being discriminated against, the wife of "tinman01" is Thai. Interviewers can be female (it seems like the State Department prefers it sometimes; all of the interviews with my wife were conducted by women). The implied titling of this thread is that Hispanics (whether illegal or legal) aren't learning English, which don't match for my personal experiences, but we're off into perception land again.
It is standard procedure at least in Thailand.
My implication is that if my wife was required to be interviewed in english then so should all immigrants. That's called a level playing field. Not only that but it makes sense to require immigrants to speak the common language of our country.
 
Old 05-18-2014, 10:01 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,897,540 times
Reputation: 22174
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinman01 View Post
It is standard procedure at least in Thailand.
My implication is that if my wife was required to be interviewed in english then so should all immigrants. That's called a level playing field. Not only that but it makes sense to require immigrants to speak the common language of our country.
Exactly.

And she was required to jump through hoops -- while those from certain countries can expect big rewards for breaking the laws and their welfare handouts be provided them in Spanish.
 
Old 05-18-2014, 10:04 AM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,897,540 times
Reputation: 22174
Quote:
Originally Posted by IBMMuseum View Post
Like I said, this doesn't make sense. Typically the only way they are coming back or staying to "legalize" is being married to a U.S. citizen, many times with a three year or ten year ban. Put in that native environment (my friend "Emi" states that Ray isn't learning English in Juarez) they can't assimilate as well. Are you saying that you are open to any former illegal alien returning? Many of your colleagues here said as much, then object to the notion when questioned further.



It wasn't a mass oath (nor for naturalization, my wife has been eligible for that over three years, which is disconcerting to some here), and if the busiest U.S. Consulate in the world (Ciudad Juarez) conducts them, it isn't a matter of numbers or nationalities. At Ciudad Juarez they try to deliberately exclude the U.S. citizen spouse/fiance(e), I got access using my military ID, and was able to sit with my family when their IVs were issued, and we all took the oath in English.

Which was interesting with an eight-year old, that had started school in the United States (under her K-4 visa) only a semester before. But back to the point (and topic), we don't typically screen immigrants for English use, it sounds like it was more of a matter that the interviewer didn't believe your relationship (which happens quite a bit to white guys and gals finding a spouse in a "brown" country). It isn't about the intending immigrant being able to carry a marriage, as the K-3 interview with my wife focused much more on the ex-husband she hadn't seen in more than six years, rather than me.
If Ray isn't learning English, it's because he doesn't want to. How long did he live illegally in the USA --- and he never made the effort to learn English then did he.

I know plenty of people who live in Juarez who speak English well enough. They learn it if they make the effort to learn it. Leave Ray in Juarez -- we really don't need more who won't assimilate.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies > Illegal Immigration
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top