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Old 04-06-2011, 01:06 PM
 
4 posts, read 10,478 times
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Default Why is crime rate so high in Springfield, IL?

We are looking at a job opportunity in the area. Springfield violent crime rate is listed as 9 on a scale of 1-10. We currently live in Naperville, IL, where the violent crime rate is 2!

Can anyone from Springfield fill me in on what makes the crime rate so high for a relatively small city and a state capital? It really makes me nervous.
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Old 04-06-2011, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
2,164 posts, read 1,989,218 times
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Hmm, those numbers may be biased to a small section of the city. In general, I'd say violent crime is quite low in Springfield on the North and West sides of the city as well as the suburban area that surrounds the city. To which area are you moving?
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Old 04-06-2011, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Hawaii-Puna District
3,591 posts, read 5,582,592 times
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Move to Chatham.
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Old 04-06-2011, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,782 posts, read 14,516,391 times
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It has been my experience that a lot of these stats are gang related or family feuds that get out of control. Springfield is a political town. By and large it as peaceful as Champaign or Bloomington. The violence does't usually spill into the general population like it does in other cities. I don't think it is race related, either.

You are close enough you can spend a weekend looking around. You won't find TJ's and Cosco - you can hop a train to St. Louis or Chicago for it.

Good luck with your job. I think the worst that will happen is you will be bored with the miles and miies of corn and beans that surround the city.
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Old 04-06-2011, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Hawaii-Puna District
3,591 posts, read 5,582,592 times
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Based upon your other posts, you can move to Chatham, spend 1/2 as much on a house as you would in the Boston area and continue to live in an area about as close to the "Naperville experience" as you could find, anywhere in Central Illinois. (malls, strip centers and chain restaurants)

There is a beautiful neighborhood 1/2 way between Springfield and Chatham that should fit your needs quite well. It is named Panther Creek, on IL Route 4 which technically may be considered Springfield.
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Old 04-07-2011, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Champaign
25 posts, read 63,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leener View Post
We are looking at a job opportunity in the area. Springfield violent crime rate is listed as 9 on a scale of 1-10. We currently live in Naperville, IL, where the violent crime rate is 2!

Can anyone from Springfield fill me in on what makes the crime rate so high for a relatively small city and a state capital? It really makes me nervous.
I had wondered the same thing never having been through the area. Looking at a road map I had assumed the towns of central Illinois were quaint little "Normal Rockwell" towns amidst the cornfields. But when I drove through I was shocked to find they were ghettos largely populated by an underclass and looked more like Harlem or Detroit or Haiti than the mom and pop "Mayberry" I had imagined.
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Old 04-07-2011, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
2,164 posts, read 1,989,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by S_the_OWL View Post
I had wondered the same thing never having been through the area. Looking at a road map I had assumed the towns of central Illinois were quaint little "Normal Rockwell" towns amidst the cornfields. But when I drove through I was shocked to find they were ghettos largely populated by an underclass and looked more like Harlem or Detroit or Haiti than the mom and pop "Mayberry" I had imagined.
Hyperbolic much? Detroit, Harlem and Haiti they ain't.
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Old 04-10-2011, 08:36 PM
 
2,062 posts, read 3,568,193 times
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Politicians! (I can't believe no said this yet)
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Old 04-12-2011, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,782 posts, read 14,516,391 times
Reputation: 5337
Default What?

What route did you take to find that? Where did you start and what was your destination? What you describe is more easlily found in Maywood, East St. Louis, south Chicago, and perhaps in some of the most southern counties in the state.

Mayberry was a myth. It was television series set in the late 1940's or early 1950's and filmed somewhere in southern states. I don't know of any towns anywhere that look like the Rockwell pastoral paintings.

Rockwell was a talented illustrator and painter whose first work was published in 1918. "His works enjoy a broad popular appeal in the United States, where Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life scenarios he created for The Saturday Evening Post magazine for more than four decades."

Norman Rockwell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Old towns have old neighborhoods. Abraham Linoln lobbied to get the Captiol moved from Vandalia to the cener of the state - which becamae Springfield - when he was a Circuit Rider. Even then it was 4-7 day ride in good weather from his Circuit in central Illinois to Sringfield. These old 'hoods in Springfield are certainly not going to look as good as the new housing developements that are only a few years old. Most people who live in rural Illinois understand this anyway. You won't see it Springfield on 1-55 but you might on ISR 29 if you look very carefully. .


Quote:
Originally Posted by S_the_OWL View Post
I had wondered the same thing never having been through the area. Looking at a road map I had assumed the towns of central Illinois were quaint little "Normal Rockwell" towns amidst the cornfields. But when I drove through I was shocked to find they were ghettos largely populated by an underclass and looked more like Harlem or Detroit or Haiti than the mom and pop "Mayberry" I had imagined.
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Old 04-12-2011, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Sugar Grove, IL
3,132 posts, read 7,402,798 times
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I agree with other posters, move to chatham! springfield isn't a small town. it has a large, diverse population and if you aren't employed in state government or at a hospital, you probably are not making huge sums of money. there are really depressed areas, with low housing values and housing projects. I think that is where the crime is.
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