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Old 06-12-2011, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 4,280,539 times
Reputation: 1247

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyandcloudydays View Post
thinking the same thing have him or her move over to the boards of his or her dreams stop whining on this board
Agreed. We here in the Illinois board to not appreciate it.
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Old 06-12-2011, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,856 posts, read 15,200,844 times
Reputation: 5380
No, no, no, no! There is no "WE" on this board that make decisions. I do. All opinions are welcome on this board as long as they are polite, not vulgar, not spam, not name calling and not trolling. We, as members of the human*race, are not going to agree with each other on every issue 100% of the time.

If you understand tornadic formation and the path they move in your area, deforestation, and where to live in a*tornado prone area, it should not ever be near you. Truthfully, straight line winds cause as much or more damage than the tornado itself. It is hard to hide from a tronado when you live in a town that has a history or being struck by tornadoes - like Joplin, Missouri. That town had never been hit by an F-5 before. When*it did, it took out 1/3 of the city. or*about 36 blocks of houses and businesses. The F5 at OKC about 10*year*earlier was on the ground for hoiurs. The path was 5 miles wide at one point and it moved*nearly 40*miles. It was an extremely rare storm. I watched some low clouds hook, come down,*pull*up*and move off*two nights ago. It was moving in the wrong direction therefore I did not worry. . .
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Old 06-12-2011, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 2,956,811 times
Reputation: 6079
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
No, no, no, no! There is no "WE" on this board that make decisions. I do. All opinions are welcome on this board as long as they are polite, not vulgar, not spam, not name calling and not trolling. We, as members of the human*race, are not going to agree with each other on every issue 100% of the time.

If you understand tornadic formation and the path they move in your area, deforestation, and where to live in a*tornado prone area, it should not ever be near you. Truthfully, straight line winds cause as much or more damage than the tornado itself. It is hard to hide from a tronado when you live in a town that has a history or being struck by tornadoes - like Joplin, Missouri. That town had never been hit by an F-5 before. When*it did, it took out 1/3 of the city. or*about 36 blocks of houses and businesses. The F5 at OKC about 10*year*earlier was on the ground for hoiurs. The path was 5 miles wide at one point and it moved*nearly 40*miles. It was an extremely rare storm. I watched some low clouds hook, come down,*pull*up*and move off*two nights ago. It was moving in the wrong direction therefore I did not worry. . .
What do you mean by where to live in a tornado prone area
as I have always been under the assumption no area is safe
even in cities, mountains , lake areas etc.

One thing that has always puzzled me was a tornado in a city
you would think the tornado would churn up enough metal, brick, wood, automobiles to choke itself and die down

but i am curious as a safe area to live in a tornado prone area what would that be
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Old 06-12-2011, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
4,028 posts, read 4,280,539 times
Reputation: 1247
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
No, no, no, no! There is no "WE" on this board that make decisions. I do. All opinions are welcome on this board as long as they are polite, not vulgar, not spam, not name calling and not trolling. We, as members of the human*race, are not going to agree with each other on every issue 100% of the time.
No, I never said anything about decisions. Appreciating something is about feeling and emotion.
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Old 06-13-2011, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Midwest
115 posts, read 49,998 times
Reputation: 59
Calm down a bit, people. I'm just voicing an opinion here. Yes, I have said some negative things, but I have also pointed out that I have paid my dues and lived a long time in Illinois. I know the "grass is greener" theory, and in many cases this is true. However, one of the reasons I like City-Data.com is that it provides some concrete data on climate, culture, employment and crime in different cities. What I am hearing a lot from both Illinoisans and Californian's is just plain wrong: people make decisions based on their emotion needs. Right now, I am trying to make the best rational, informed decision for my family. Saying that crime is higher in Oxnard versus Rockford or Chicago is just ludicrous unless the reported statistics are flat out wrong, which I don't believe they are. On top of this, I have actually spent some time in the places I have mentioned so it isn't just some vague dream in my head. I have lived 10 years in Houston, TX. and also 4 years in Balitmore, MD. so I have lived other places. Illinois has been home base for me for quite a while. But now it is time to move on.

I can understand not wanting negative "criticism" of our state, but honestly, I think it is this "hear no evil, see no evil" attitude that perpetuates problems in our fair state since we are not addressing the negatives head on. Call it whining if you want, but unless the root cause of problems in Illinois are addressed, we will keep having high taxes, corruption, high crime and unemployment, and a huge state deficit. Just because I was born here and educated through two state universities doesn't mean I can't see Illinois for what it is. Sometimes, we have to take the good with the bad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thePR View Post
Not soon enough.

I like it here. You don't seem like you would enjoy anywhere that much because you just want to complain and hate it.
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Old 06-14-2011, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,856 posts, read 15,200,844 times
Reputation: 5380
Default tornadic activity

A storm as powerful of an EF-5 tornado that produces 200+mph winds destroys everything in its path. Fortunately*most tornadoes are not nearly that strong and do not usually enter the heart of a city. A tornado does not usually stay on the ground long. Three minutes can seem like an eternity when you are in one.

The tornadoes I've seen move SW to NE. Tornadoes can change direction.
The Joplin tornado was moving NE but turned SE when the hook developed a ball. Straight-line winds are just as dangerous, but does not change direction.

Tornadoes frequently form in fields such as corn, soybean or cotton flelds, and follow a path of least resistance. This includes 5 lane streets, Interstate routes and any route that has wide shoulders and large parking lots that front the street. I can think of six towns in Illinois and Missouri that either face, or are built acoss an interstate route. All have four and five lane streets with wide shoulders and large parking lots. All have been visited by tornadoes. All are located in large deforested areas, too.

What tornadoes do not generally do is jump over a mile wide river, jump over high cliffs, or jump over heavily forested areas. A tornadoe can jump from one low hill to the next. It can jump over Interstate routes. The force odf the EF-5 can blow out commercial windows, destroy upper stories of tall buildings, physically suck passsengers out of convertibles, and move 2,000 pound objects several miles. Joplin is still looking for victims.

I don't know anything about tornadoes in mountains. Lakes are a natural magnet as tornadoes gather strength from water.

Location is everything when it comes to safety. Know the path of tornadoes in your town. NOAA.gov can provide the information. Do not live in a common tornado path. Do not live closer than 20 miles from a common tornado path. Tornadoes that commonly move NE do not commonly turn NW, but given the right circumstance it obviously can.

I live in a known tornado producing area now that is very near water and surrounded by farm fields. I am 50 miles from the nearest Interstate route in a heavily forested area. The route I live on is a 20 mile stretch of due E-W road. Most tornadoes hit in an area 30-40 miles NE. I did see a small hook form the other night when we were under a tornado watch. It didn't form. It acted more like a yo-yo and kept moving to the NE.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyandcloudydays View Post
What do you mean by where to live in a tornado prone area as I have always been under the assumption no area is safe even in cities, mountains , lake areas etc.

One thing that has always puzzled me was a tornado in a city
you would think the tornado would churn up enough metal, brick, wood, automobiles to choke itself and die down but i am curious as a safe area to live in a tornado prone area what would that be

Last edited by linicx; 06-14-2011 at 05:18 PM..
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Old 06-15-2011, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
3,528 posts, read 2,956,811 times
Reputation: 6079
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
A storm as powerful of an EF-5 tornado that produces 200+mph winds destroys everything in its path. Fortunately*most tornadoes are not nearly that strong and do not usually enter the heart of a city. A tornado does not usually stay on the ground long. Three minutes can seem like an eternity when you are in one.

The tornadoes I've seen move SW to NE. Tornadoes can change direction.
The Joplin tornado was moving NE but turned SE when the hook developed a ball. Straight-line winds are just as dangerous, but does not change direction.

Tornadoes frequently form in fields such as corn, soybean or cotton flelds, and follow a path of least resistance. This includes 5 lane streets, Interstate routes and any route that has wide shoulders and large parking lots that front the street. I can think of six towns in Illinois and Missouri that either face, or are built acoss an interstate route. All have four and five lane streets with wide shoulders and large parking lots. All have been visited by tornadoes. All are located in large deforested areas, too.

What tornadoes do not generally do is jump over a mile wide river, jump over high cliffs, or jump over heavily forested areas. A tornadoe can jump from one low hill to the next. It can jump over Interstate routes. The force odf the EF-5 can blow out commercial windows, destroy upper stories of tall buildings, physically suck passsengers out of convertibles, and move 2,000 pound objects several miles. Joplin is still looking for victims.

I don't know anything about tornadoes in mountains. Lakes are a natural magnet as tornadoes gather strength from water.

Location is everything when it comes to safety. Know the path of tornadoes in your town. NOAA.gov can provide the information. Do not live in a common tornado path. Do not live closer than 20 miles from a common tornado path. Tornadoes that commonly move NE do not commonly turn NW, but given the right circumstance it obviously can.

I live in a known tornado producing area now that is very near water and surrounded by farm fields. I am 50 miles from the nearest Interstate route in a heavily forested area. The route I live on is a 20 mile stretch of due E-W road. Most tornadoes hit in an area 30-40 miles NE. I did see a small hook form the other night when we were under a tornado watch. It didn't form. It acted more like a yo-yo and kept moving to the NE.
It has always been an observation of mine in addition to what I hear on the news tv , weather news etc. The reason tornados seem or appear to form in fields is because fields are more common than a city. In regards
there is alot more open space in the country than in the cities.

I find your comments on the tornado paths interesting - I really have not seen any stats on this ever and would be very interested in learning more about that subject.

Weather has always been one of my favorite subjects doesnt matter if its tornado winter weather or hail - anything weather related is just interesting.
i have seen the path of tornados on noaa but never historical patterns
as they usually say they form anyplace - how much of that is true !
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Old 06-15-2011, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,856 posts, read 15,200,844 times
Reputation: 5380
Tornadoes in Illinois are more common in the summer than in the winter. I've never heard of a tornadoe that formed in a city. Water is tornado fuel. Tornadoes commonly .form in cornfields as this is a very high hunidity crop and Illinois has 1000s of*acres of the stuff.
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Old 06-15-2011, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Lake Arlington Heights, IL
5,463 posts, read 6,384,156 times
Reputation: 2661
I think there are some misconceptions in Lini's statement. People in Utica thought the valley and river would protect them and it didn't. Couple years ago there was a funnel cloud on Chicago's lakefront near Loyola University. In the Trib weather section, there was a detail of a high elevation tornado in the Rockies. Yes there are areas tornados are more common, but they can happen in many areas. Just ask the people in Massachusetts.
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Old 06-15-2011, 12:18 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 897,145 times
Reputation: 1111
If fxguy is still around, I'd nominate Bloomington, Indiana and its outlying area as a good place to look.

You have the culture of Indiana U. and dining options + rolling hills and forests + easy commute times + low cost of living + safe (the recent media story of an IU student missing/possibly abducted notwithstanding). Bloomington schools are decent and there are plenty of lakes around as well.

If you want beauty within 4.5-5 hrs of Chicago at a reasonable price, it's a good place to look. You could even live in neighboring Brown County, which is stunning. Type "Brown County Indiana" into google and search under the images tab for the general idea/vistas. Morgan-Monroe forest on the other side of Bloomington also offers beautiful topography. Many IU professors buy themselves a plot of land surrounded by rolling woods 15 min outside of Bloomington and commute into town. People are friendly, but they give you your space too. A lot of Indy residents go have small cottages in the area to get away from everything as well, and I spent many a weekend in the summer doing that: hiking, playing board games, fishing, boating, canoeing, going into town for a nice meal and a walk through dowtown Bloomington, etc.

Other than that I'd suggest someplace in the hill land of MO, KY, TN, or WV, but Bloomington is probably your closest bet.

Last edited by Chicago76; 06-15-2011 at 12:26 PM..
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