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Old 04-24-2013, 04:20 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, IN
855 posts, read 2,124,662 times
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Mishawaka is not a suburb of South Bend. It was actually incorporated over thirty years before South Bend was and while they're commonly referred to as South Bend-Mishawaka these days, not unlike the aforementioned Minneapolis-St. Paul analogy, they are individual incorporated cities. I believe at least some of South Bend's growth and notoriety can be attributed to Notre Dame. If that lake hadn't existed just north of what would be South Bend and UND(Complete name: L’Université de Notre Dame du Lac: The University of Our Lady of the Lake) had been founded five miles to the east, things may have turned out differently. It might also have been named differently. But I digress.

If anything, Granger might be considered a suburb of Mishawaka(I'm not suggesting it is). The association between the two is much more common, both share part of the same school district and many of the people that originally migrated there came from Mishawaka, at least according to my wife who has lived here all her life. (I'll just say over fifty years, fewer than seventy. )

I don't pay much attention to the topic because it doesn't affect us personally but I'm not sure why Granger has never incorporated.
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Old 04-24-2013, 08:09 AM
 
2,462 posts, read 7,896,048 times
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For those who have lived their whole lives in the area, there are evidently real differences between these communities.

However, for newcomers, especially those from major metro areas, they all blend in together and we would be hard-pressed to tell you where one ends and the other begins, especially given the lack of signage regarding boundaries.
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Old 04-24-2013, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
3,854 posts, read 4,256,707 times
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I worked with a guy in Granger once who lived in Mishawaka. He and his wife had to drive to Goshen for something one day and they were already at their destination without realizing they had even made it to Goshen. They thought they were still in Elkhart. If you take the right roads, you can easily drive the 25-30 miles from the southeast side of Goshen through Elkhart, Osceola, Mishawaka, and to the west side of South Bend without ever leaving a city, or even realizing you've gone from one city to another.
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Old 04-24-2013, 12:38 PM
 
5,703 posts, read 15,485,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
A suburb is a town. A subdivision is a residential neighborhood immediately outside a larger city, I hope you're not confusing the two.

So now all suburbs actually have to border the city limits? I wonder how many of Chicago's suburbs actually border the city limits, I wonder how many of the suburbs of Indianapolis actually border the city limits, how many of the suburbs of Columbus actually border the city limits?

Granger is separated from South Bend by barely 3 miles of Mishawaka, that's a pretty narrow strip. Besides, the true definition of a suburb suggests nothing about a suburb bordering the actual city, it's only 3 miles away...I would say that's close enough, it's not as if I'm suggesting Lapaz is a suburb of South Bend.
Yes, I do understand the difference between a subdivision and suburb. Wikipedia is not a valid source for quoting definitions by the way. I do not believe Granger or Mishawaka are considered burbs of South Bend and it appears those that lived in this area for most of their lives feel the same way.
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Old 04-24-2013, 12:40 PM
 
5,703 posts, read 15,485,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
For those who have lived their whole lives in the area, there are evidently real differences between these communities.

However, for newcomers, especially those from major metro areas, they all blend in together and we would be hard-pressed to tell you where one ends and the other begins, especially given the lack of signage regarding boundaries.
Ugh...dont get me started on the poor signage! Even after updating my GPS, it still cant find certain roads!
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Old 04-24-2013, 04:34 PM
 
1,406 posts, read 2,316,077 times
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IMO, Mishawaka and South Bend are two different beasts. Granger is more suburb-ish to MIshawaka. Considering a majority of the shopping and visiting is spent in Mishawaka and Granger, South Bend's starting to have more of a suburb feel- or at least a passerby city as you get places. It's tough to realize where one city ends and another begins, afterall.


Mishawaka's downtown is more comparable to a small town or city's downtown, whereas the landscape of South Bend's downtown is larger scaled. I prefer Mishawaka to SB.
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Old 04-24-2013, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Charlotte Area
3,165 posts, read 2,896,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
For those who have lived their whole lives in the area, there are evidently real differences between these communities.

However, for newcomers, especially those from major metro areas, they all blend in together and we would be hard-pressed to tell you where one ends and the other begins, especially given the lack of signage regarding boundaries.
I think it's tough because SB, Mishawaka and Osceola all are in the same county. I lived there for just over 21 years and I could tell you where one ends and one begins. I left Indiana and moved to NoVa and just learned where one ends and one begins.
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Old 04-25-2013, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,895 posts, read 4,382,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallingwater View Post
I disagree because a suburb is generally a residential area immediately outside a larger city. Granger doesn't even border South Bend. It borders Mishawaka, Clay Township and Elkhart.
I agree.
Carmel, Indiana and Fishers north of Indianapolis would be the ultimate classic example of Suburbs.
If you want do a Carmel VS Granger comparison. Granger in a way is kind of like a suburb but it does blend into the city very well and unlike Carmel doesn't have a major business district or downtown.
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Old 04-29-2013, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, IN
855 posts, read 2,124,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
For those who have lived their whole lives in the area, there are evidently real differences between these communities.

However, for newcomers, especially those from major metro areas, they all blend in together and we would be hard-pressed to tell you where one ends and the other begins, especially given the lack of signage regarding boundaries.
This says it fairly well. It's a blended region, where one area transitions into the other before you're even aware it happened. Blink and you'll miss the signs that are there to make you aware that you've passed into a different city. South Bend, Mishawaka, Granger, Osceola and Roseland are almost indistinguishable from one another because you pass from one to another before you know it but they all have separate identities.

I grew up in a county in NJ that had several different municipalities, some of them miles apart from the next. You knew when you were leaving one town and there was a buffer between the one you were leaving and the next. That isn't the case in this part of St. Joe County. There are several municipalities with individual identities but at the same time they are all intertwined because of their proximity to one another.
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Old 05-06-2013, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Southwest Nebraska
1,297 posts, read 4,023,684 times
Reputation: 893
Granger is also home to a Nudist colony when I lived near there back in 1995!
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