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Old 06-04-2006, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Middletown, NY, USA
2 posts, read 5,365 times
Reputation: 10

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I have just read an interesting article in The New York Times about how this town in Indiana, which was losing population, developed this initiative to cut reliance on imported oil, and to base as much of its energy sources as possible on renewables. The article can be found at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/04/us...ewanted=2&_r=1

This seemed like quite a forward-looking and gutsy idea that they were actually going to do. This is the sort of town that I might want to call my home town. I have been here in Middletown taking care of my mother and my family has been here, but my mother died last year and I have been thinking of relocating to some new rural area. I would love to hear from anybody with ideas either on the initiative or my plans. Thanks!

Christopher
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Old 06-15-2006, 01:38 PM
 
5 posts, read 18,169 times
Reputation: 12
I would not recommend this community. I lived in the area for several years and the local population is very closed minded. The mindset is very resistant to change. Unless you have a long family history in the area, you are viewed as an outsider. The local decline in population is directly related to the poor atmosphere. My business interests were never fully embraced and I left.

The initiative itself is great, but some of the promises seem a little far fetched. I read somewhere that as many as 3000 local jobs would be generated. The planned plants and uses of bio-technology there and in a few nearby communities do not support such a claim.

The farming in the area would switch to primarily corn-based growth. This will ruin the established practice of crop rotation between soy beans and corn and lead to rapid depletion of the soil. Farmers would enjoy an initial boost in income from the increased demand for corn, but as soon as enough corn was made available from increase production, farmers will be right back where they are now and be left with nutrient-starved soil.

Trying to get a big bang today has consequences later that don't appear to be well thought out. I would be careful about committing to a move to the area right now.
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Old 10-04-2007, 02:10 PM
 
4 posts, read 21,206 times
Reputation: 14
Default Middletown,Indiana

I ditto Mr. Jones sentiments exactly! If you like a town ran by a redneck, gustapo-like town board that enforces their wishes as a community standard upon others with a constant threat of legal action then you might like Middletown. To many people with old blood with no forward thinking at all. Many who moved from the larger cities to be in a small town atmosphere moving in and trying to create exacting what they wanted to escape by leaving the large cities.
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Old 12-26-2008, 05:15 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,523 times
Reputation: 10
I admit the town of Middletown is set in its ways, and outsiders are not very welcome unless they are married to an insider, but in general they are good down to earth people just trying to make it like every other small community.
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Old 12-27-2008, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Western Hoosierland
18,264 posts, read 6,947,844 times
Reputation: 5943
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christopher Hobe Morrison View Post
I have just read an interesting article in The New York Times about how this town in Indiana, which was losing population, developed this initiative to cut reliance on imported oil, and to base as much of its energy sources as possible on renewables. The article can be found at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/04/us...ewanted=2&_r=1

This seemed like quite a forward-looking and gutsy idea that they were actually going to do. This is the sort of town that I might want to call my home town. I have been here in Middletown taking care of my mother and my family has been here, but my mother died last year and I have been thinking of relocating to some new rural area. I would love to hear from anybody with ideas either on the initiative or my plans. Thanks!

Christopher

with the way the economy is I do believe that Reynolds and the Bio Initiative has been stopped for now.
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Old 12-29-2008, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Turn Left at Greenland
17,698 posts, read 34,851,784 times
Reputation: 7940
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdude View Post
with the way the economy is I do believe that Reynolds and the Bio Initiative has been stopped for now.
I don't think it ever really got started.
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