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Unread 03-24-2007, 09:31 PM
 
13 posts, read 62,306 times
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Question i need some info on the university of notre dame

I've been looking into which college i want to attend once out of high school, and I've recently considered Notre Dame. If anyone could please help me out, I'd greatly appreciate it.
I need to know the type of weather that part of Indiana has.
Also, is there a really good english department there? I'm thinking of majoring in english.
What is there to do there, as far as entertainment? What's the social scene like? Would it be considered a "party school", or a more conservative school?
Does being a catholic matter a lot?

-thanks =]
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Unread 03-25-2007, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Turn Left at Greenland
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Are you a top student? ND is increasingly hard to get into. Even the feeder high schools aren't feeder schools anymore. It's also becoming a school where only the rich can get into. My husband went there in the 80's when ND had a very stong tradition of being affordable for most anyone and they trolled for blue collar kids (like my husband). Those days are gone, I'm afraid. I did read that it's going to cost upwards of 50K per year next year.

I don't want to trash the place. It's a top notch school. All areas are great and you wouldn't have any trouble finding a job or landing a great post graduate education anywhere.

It's becoming very ivy league in the way that the hardest part is getting in. Once you are in, you're in.

Weather ... typical midwestern. Maybe a little more snow than in some places, similar weather to Chicago. ND students are very insulated. They take care of you in every way. You won't need to leave campus to have fun. Basically, you'll know the campus and University Park Mall.

Best of luck.
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Emma Goldman
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Unread 03-25-2007, 11:50 PM
 
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thanks =]
i'm a bit intimidated now though, but anything's worth a try
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Unread 03-26-2007, 06:03 AM
 
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If you check the standard college guides, you'll find everything you wanted to know about Notre Dame (and every other school).
But, in a nutshell, Notre Dame accepts only about 25% of its applicants, most of whom did extremely well in high school. It is unique among elite schools in its single-sex dorms and strict rules regarding visitation. It is also unique in its retention rate of nearly 100%. Very few students drop or transfer out -- most are genuinely thrilled to be there. About 85% of its undergrads are Catholic. The tuition is high, but Notre Dame has an endowment of more than $5 BILLION, so there is plenty of financial aid for those who can demonstrate need. A true blue-collar family with high-achieving kids should not be scared away by sticker shock. An upper-middle class family can be expected to pay full freight. South Bend is not a typical college town, but Notre Dame is a self-contained world so it matters little to most students. The weather is great for studying in the winter.
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Unread 03-27-2007, 01:33 PM
 
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Default ND and other colleges for consideration

Quote:
Originally Posted by lucyinthesky View Post
I've been looking into which college i want to attend once out of high school, and I've recently considered Notre Dame. If anyone could please help me out, I'd greatly appreciate it.
I need to know the type of weather that part of Indiana has.
Also, is there a really good english department there? I'm thinking of majoring in english.
What is there to do there, as far as entertainment? What's the social scene like? Would it be considered a "party school", or a more conservative school?
Does being a catholic matter a lot?

-thanks =]
Weather in South Bend Indiana is generally a bit cool year round with the exception of 2-3 months in the summer. They have all four seasons and are very much like the New England area of the US. The winters are noted for being filled with a lot of snow-fall and ice due to the lake-effect snow they receive (very much like Buffalo NY). Overall, the weather is fine - unless you hail from Florida, California, or Arizona - then you may be in for a shocker.

The ND campus is absolutely awesome (as it should be for the tuition they charge).. it's like a small city and in fact you would find yourself part of a very large student body in a beautiful campus location with plenty to do. It's not known for being a part school - but they take their sports teams very seriously. If you are not a sports fanatic, you probably will have to become one shortly after your first semester begins just to fit in. ND football ... they are hugely popular and people travel from all over to see the games.

You absolutely need to do some sound research on the top English programs available. What do you intend to do with your degree? --- you should find out what program can best prepare you for that future occupation. Information is in abundance online and via print publications available at your high school guidance office and at your library.

Try to get into the best program you can despite costs --- you can always get loans/financial aid/scholarships/work-study arrangements to help pay for college so do not let the stated tuition cost for anywhere deter you. Some will potentially argue otherwise, but realistically, anyone that shoots for "value" when seeking a college education soon upon graduation realizes the mistake when they have recruiting difficulties or difficulty getting into the best graduate programs.

College programs are divided into "Tiers" --- 1st tier schools/programs are the best... 3rd Tier and regional are the lowest ranked. Unless you plan to be self-employed, you will want to strive for the best tiered program you can get into. ND has several Tier 1 programs - as far as Universities go, it is one of the top ones in our country. For what it is worth, it has brand name recognition that is very high... up there with any of the Ivy League's.
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Unread 03-27-2007, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Turn Left at Greenland
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And remember, in order to graduate, you have to know how to swim. I'm not kidding. My husband had to take a swimming test in order to graduate. It's a wonderful place and if you can get in, by all means, GO!!!
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Unread 03-27-2007, 02:45 PM
 
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I would be one to argue that a motivated and hard-working student -- especially one who wants to go on to graduate or professional school -- should think twice about loading up on debt to attend a "name" college. Many solid state universities have excellent honors programs for their top students that rival the education available at "name" colleges, and these programs can easily qualify students for even the most demanding graduate schools. The key is to work hard and to take advantage of every opportunity at whatever school you attend. Obviously, there is a difference between the education available at a second-rate state teacher's college and Notre Dame, but if you can be admitted and pay in-state rates to the University of Virginia, Berkeley, UNC, Michigan, etc., it's certainly worth considering.
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Unread 03-27-2007, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Turn Left at Greenland
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You just don't have a gosh darned good thing to say about SB do you? I'm serious. Notre Dame, yes, it's expensive, and I say that if she can get in, she should go. I went to a small private college and loaded up on debt. Am I sorry, NOPE! I knew what I was getting into. The only state school in Indiana that I would consider to save money would be IU. Their english program is very good too, but gosh, ND is ND.
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Unread 03-27-2007, 03:18 PM
 
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Default argue for value in college education vs reputation/program rank

Quote:
Originally Posted by claremarie View Post
I would be one to argue that a motivated and hard-working student -- especially one who wants to go on to graduate or professional school -- should think twice about loading up on debt to attend a "name" college. Many solid state universities have excellent honors programs for their top students that rival the education available at "name" colleges, and these programs can easily qualify students for even the most demanding graduate schools. The key is to work hard and to take advantage of every opportunity at whatever school you attend. Obviously, there is a difference between the education available at a second-rate state teacher's college and Notre Dame, but if you can be admitted and pay in-state rates to the University of Virginia, Berkeley, UNC, Michigan, etc., it's certainly worth considering.
You can argue this - I've heard/seen it done first hand :-) But it took a lot of not only hard work, but moxy on my part to experience success. Compared with peers who loaded up on debt to attend Harvard, MIT and Cornell in their undergraduate years... well I'm sorry to say, at least looking in excess of 10 years later... their undergrad debt was definitely 100% well worth it. For each and every case it easily opened up doors for them careerwise which I had to pry open with sheer will and effort (and still have to today).

The argument for a "value-focused college education" is something I anticipate seeing more of as more and more kids become college bound each year and the top programs become more and more competitive/expensive to get into. The only times to consider it is if you have no idea what to major in, suck at academics, or if you are going to college to party on your parent's tab rather than gain access to a great education. Otherwise you'll just shoot yourself in the foot.

Haven't you ever noticed that the professors of 3rd tier schools are graduates of 2nd, and 2nd tier schools are graduates of 1st? That professors/teachers at community/local colleges and high schools are almost always graduates of 3rd tier/regional programs? This is just the "education industry" - but outside of this industry, haven't you ever noticed that in business, I mean Top Fortune 500 or even 1000 global corporate america, that the company officers down through the director level are nearly 100% 1st tier college graduates. Do you think this is all a coincidence? There's always exceptions to the rule, but generally this is the trend.

Just something to think about.
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Unread 03-27-2007, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Turn Left at Greenland
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I'll vouch for that one! I worked for 2 international law firms (one NYC based, the other Chicago based). Both firms hired the top 10% from the top 10 schools. Guess what, some of the most dense people I ever worked with graduated from Ivy schools, and yes, ND. Going to those name schools opens lots of doors that going to a value based school wouldn't. I would take on any amount of debt load if I could get into ND, Duke, Stanford or an ivy just to have access to their alumni connections. It's an investment in your future.
__________________
If there won't be dancing at the revolution, I'm not coming.
Emma Goldman
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