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Old 01-07-2010, 02:47 PM
 
Location: SW Michigan
111 posts, read 163,246 times
Reputation: 59
If you live in the Michiana area, you'll be hard pressed to find much.

I manage a department at a local grocery store.
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Old 01-07-2010, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,082 posts, read 6,138,298 times
Reputation: 2791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grandma(in waiting) View Post
No one should contemplate a move at this point unless they have a concrete job offer. I hear stories all of the time about people moving to places with lower unemployment rates only to find that there are no jobs to be found when they get there.
This is true for specific structured industries. I would definately say your advice is appropriate for, say, an Engineer or Teacher who can secure job offers from large companies from thousands of miles away.

However, for entrepenuers, freelancers, and independent contractors/consultants, I believe it's best to relocate to areas with higher population density and enhanced economic activity if you intend to start your own business. Generally small retail shops, independent contractors, and family resturants are drowned out by the big-box stores, and chain operators in the Indiana college towns I'm familiar with. Likewise, independent operators (say a freelance graphic designer; even now you can find 10 new advertised positions a day in LA, while you'd be lucky to come across 1 every two months in an Indiana college town) just can't find as much economic activity to keep their business afloat except maybe near Indianapolis and Chicago.
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Old 01-07-2010, 10:29 PM
 
Location: The Middle
5,154 posts, read 7,077,423 times
Reputation: 6357
Thanks all. Everyone's comments are pretty much confirming what I had thought. Along with getting a degree in a line of work that has no calling here, I also have several years of unemployment under my belt. I devoted several years to my family, working part time jobs and staying at home with my child. Now that he is older, it is time for me to get out there which of course is the worst possible time and in a new place. I attended a small college in my home state that is well known there but no one here seems to take my education seriously. I did not attend IU or ND.

The college I attended lumps graphic design and marketing into a business degree. Most universities view graphic design as a art degree not business. My college and IU are part of the same accreditation but IU will only accept a handful of credits that will transfer. I was told by the IU advisor to finish up what I have going on and then start off fresh with them, which means starting over. When my husband got the job offer here I was not overly thrilled by the possibilities but since he has always been the main bread winner, it was a great opportunity for him. At that time, and it must have been a huge fluke, there were 4 jobs in the paper for graphic designers. After we moved here, I have only seen one job ad. It required 7+ years of experience and also in Corel. Corel is an older software that is not industry standard. I even phoned my old college professor and asked if I should learn this software. Her response was "OMG, that is soo old! Where in the heck did you move to!"

I sometimes think the school I attended was not good enough except that all my former classmates are working and using their degrees! So its on to plan B, just not sure what that will be. I have tried offer freelance services for dirt cheap and even free (just to get some sort of client base) but people here seem perfectly happy with mediocre business cards and other advertising materials. I guess if it works, then why change it. (sigh)
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Old 01-08-2010, 04:04 AM
 
265 posts, read 544,521 times
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Sponger, if you have the start up capital to do that and money in the bank for living costs, I do agree with you. However again, not many of us have the money in reserve to do that. Rents in LA are sky high as are other costs.

We have friends who moved to the LA area two years ago. He accepted a job transfer so he is set. She is a radiology technician, a career that is in high demand some places. She can't find a job and they're hurting, even with his 90K a year salary. They can't afford to buy a house out there, even with the equity in the bank they had from selling their house here and rental costs are bleeding them. He is trying to get a transfer back to where the cost of living is more reasonable.

I minored in computer science in college and took some online courses in software architecture and malware removal. As a side business, I go into companies and install their new software and clean up computers that have been infected with viruses/trojans. I get paid around $80/hr to do that. Great money and I can go in on my own time (usually weekends since I work during the week), but it's not steady work and nothing I can count on for a regular income. Entrepreneurship is risky business, but again, if you have the money for startup or can secure a small business loan and keeping your home/feeding your family doesn't rest on your success, go for it.
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Old 01-08-2010, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,082 posts, read 6,138,298 times
Reputation: 2791
Falling: Ouch! I feel for any graphic artist or other creative media type job seeker in Indiana. If you're stuck here, you might want to consider switching professions. Someone mentioned nursing, and I think that's a winner along with pharmacy or pharm tech. Hahaha "Corel". What?? Have they never heard of "Adobe". Maybe you could write them and clue them into this new fad called the "internet"... ouch. Corel; I remember playing with that prog on my friend's computer in... 1991. Serious ouch.

Grandma: actually, making it in LA is not so hard, you just have to adjust your paradigm. A house or any sort of big living space is going to cost the megabucks, but you can find great apartments (walking distance to the beach, nice neighbors/hood, close bars, farmers markets, decent schools, freeway access right out the back door, for around $900/mo.) most anywhere you want in the fairly affordable range. Utilities are cheap because of the great weather near the coast, thouch AC will hit you inland if you end up in the valleys. You just have to accept that you're not going to live in Beverley Hills or have 4br's and 3ba's with 2-3 big SUV's in your 3 car garage.

The main thing is that job seekers will find a dozen offers a month out there. There's plenty of capital floating around the big cities for smart, motivated people. We used to surf in the early AM and then hit work from 9AM sometimes until 6PM and picnic on the beach or go dancing, sometimes just work at moonlighting until midnight at all the temp jobs that pop up for independent contractors, make some serious money, and then party hard on the weekends or travel.

Indiana is a LOT different. It seems like it's 8-to-5 or nothing. There's just not the sort of open niches that the big metros on the coasts offer. It's just not for us. It's great for a lot of people. Heck, all our neighbors (except the one who blew his brains out a few months back) seem totally content, as do our hoosier friends. There's vegans, repubs, dems, socialites, etc here. I am not knocking Indiana in any way, it's just not for people like us, and those who are here who are in a similiar position are best advised to face the reality of their new situation so they can make smart decisions.
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Old 01-08-2010, 10:06 AM
 
265 posts, read 544,521 times
Reputation: 122
I moved to Indiana from California (I was born and raised in northern California) and when I first moved, I was shocked...my salary was half of what it was out there, rents were really no lower and utility costs were much higher (we were in NIPSCO territory originally). I would laugh when people would ask how I could afford to live in the Bay Area and people were flabbergasted when I told them about my beautiful 2 BR apartment in the Berkeley Hills that rented for $282 a month and the highest utility bill I ever paid was a little over $15. However, now, it's not that way. Rents are substantially higher (if you can find a nice 2br in a safe area for $900, please let me know where and I will send the info to Ted and Paula). They can't find anything (2 bedroom) much under $2000 and that's not in Beverly Hills. It's in a middle class area like Torrance.

Utilities are no longer a bargain. In fact, if you use a cost of living calculator, you will see that utilities in the LA area are a bit higher. They don't drive a gas guzzling SUV and their needs are modest. The company he works for pays the same across the board. There is no allowance for moving to an area with a higher cost of living (and according to those same COL calculators, one example Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitors sites is not allowed):

A salary of $90,000 in Indianapolis, Indiana should increase to $186,766 in Los Angeles, California

If you're young, have no children to put through school or other obligations and can fly by the seat of your pants, relocating carries no more a risk than "nothing ventured, nothing gained". If you do have children to support or other financial obligations, it can be a scary proposition, especially now. Many of my childhood friends are reaching retirement age and looking to relocate because they simply can't afford to retire in the Golden state.

Last edited by Yac; 02-23-2010 at 05:52 AM..
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Old 01-08-2010, 04:38 PM
 
1,650 posts, read 2,211,368 times
Reputation: 1085
Quote:
Originally Posted by sponger42 View Post
Falling: Ouch! I feel for any graphic artist or other creative media type job seeker in Indiana. I feel for these people everywhere. I heard the job market is horrible all over the country for graphic artists and that they were the first laid off when the recession hit. If you're stuck here, you might want to consider switching professions. Yes, this is true. Someone mentioned nursing, and I think that's a winner along with pharmacy or pharm tech. Hahaha "Corel". What?? Have they never heard of "Adobe". Maybe you could write them and clue them into this new fad called the "internet"... ouch. Corel; I remember playing with that prog on my friend's computer in... 1991. Serious ouch.

Grandma: actually, making it in LA is not so hard, you just have to adjust your paradigm. A house or any sort of big living space is going to cost the megabucks, but you can find great apartments (walking distance to the beach, nice neighbors/hood, close bars, farmers markets, decent schools, freeway access right out the back door, for around $900/mo.) most anywhere you want in the fairly affordable range. Really? A friend of mine lives there and can't find any apartments under $1500 a month. She would be happy to hear about where you found an apartment for $900 a month. She is living off section 8 or she would be forced to move. Utilities are cheap because of the great weather near the coast, thouch AC will hit you inland if you end up in the valleys. You just have to accept that you're not going to live in Beverley Hills or have 4br's and 3ba's with 2-3 big SUV's in your 3 car garage.

The main thing is that job seekers will find a dozen offers a month out there. There's plenty of capital floating around the big cities for smart, motivated people. It does seem like most of the jobs in this recession are concentrated around some of the larger cities. Small towns just don't have much work. We used to surf in the early AM and then hit work from 9AM sometimes until 6PM and picnic on the beach or go dancing, sometimes just work at moonlighting until midnight at all the temp jobs that pop up for independent contractors, make some serious money, and then party hard on the weekends or travel.

Indiana is a LOT different. It seems like it's 8-to-5 or nothing. There's just not the sort of open niches that the big metros on the coasts offer. It's just not for us. It's great for a lot of people. Heck, all our neighbors (except the one who blew his brains out a few months back) seem totally content, as do our hoosier friends. There's vegans, repubs, dems, socialites, etc here. I am not knocking Indiana in any way, it's just not for people like us, and those who are here who are in a similiar position are best advised to face the reality of their new situation so they can make smart decisions.
My comments are in bold.
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
15,653 posts, read 10,557,370 times
Reputation: 35193
Here you need to adjust your job hunting thoughts and look at every place you go as an opportunity.

~~Apply at temporary agencies like Manpower to get your foot in the door of a potential future employer.

~~Volunteer at the local schools, churches, hospitals, nursing homes or non profit places. Many get hired from their volunteer work.

~~You are more employable if you currently have a job so take a part time one some place.

~~Find the bullentin boards of colleges around you to check regularly for work posted.

~~Tutor in your home.

~~Have a YMCA around you? Volunteer to get on later or for your price to join for a year until you find work.


Bottom line there are jobs, might not be the field or the position you prefer but folks have forgotten about working your way up.

Good luck.
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,082 posts, read 6,138,298 times
Reputation: 2791
Okay, I'm not gonna tell you my secret SoCal location, you'll just have to find it yourself. Here's the description: Beautiful renovated 2 Br 2 Ba Ocean View apartment in a quiet safe neighborhood. Great supervisor who has since had a stroke. I hope he's recovered. $1100 month-month, never any trouble getting repairs or nonsense with the owner. Can be bargained down at least to 1000. 5 minute walk to a deserted beach, 5 minute walk to a strip of bars, farmer's market, rail depot, and shopping, 10 minute walk to a 99c store that sells fresh local produce. 45 minute commute to work (max). Walk down and get good surf every morning before work.

We lived in a 1br for 850.

Now for the areas I will admit to: North Hollywood was a pretty good deal. Big 1br 1ba apartment in a decent neighborhood (near the Ralphs) for 900/month. There were townhouse style 4-floor condos going up in the nighborhood for reasonable prices which have probably since been reduced. We loved the design and would have bought had we not been driven to move to the coast. NOHO's got some character and characters, just like any part of LA. The Orange Line gives you access to the entire valley and a great bikeway. The red line terminates in NOHO, so you can get anywhere the metro runs. Going over the hill into hollywood is a b*tch, but not as bad as living deeper in the valley.

I really liked El Segundo if you can get over the idea of living sandwiched between refineries. When I looked, prices weren't too bad. Close to surf, LAX, and bikeable to VB and all the fun to be had there. Meh access to downtown.

If you work there, Canoga Park isn't the worst place to live. At least not close to the 101. Not too much of a drive to the beaches, downtown (I mean around midnight when traffic starts to let up). There were some okay 1br places for the low 1000's. If you hunted, you could find stuff like 4br 3ba's for 1400's. Just not in Oakwood or whatever those yuppie complexes are called.

But our little slice of paradise was by far the best. DM me and I'll tell you where it is so you can share with your friends. It is too far for anyone who works from anywhere south of Sherman Oaks, though. I mean, unless you want to do the 5 hours in a car every day thing.
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Old 01-09-2010, 01:15 PM
 
265 posts, read 544,521 times
Reputation: 122
Thanks! DM sent.
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