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Old 02-22-2012, 12:52 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,355 posts, read 6,563,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Yup. I get a kick out of these women in KC. They treat me like I am some kind of zit. They don't even know that I come not only from a pretty affluent background in New England but also that I have family and friends that went to Ivy League schools and have a couple of friends in some pretty important positions in the Federal government.
You should tell them about your impressive family background back east and your important friends in government.

That should work well with the friendly midwestern women in KC.
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Old 02-22-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
7,355 posts, read 6,563,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Yes, I generally coin the attitude of many KC locals as "willfully ignorant." Even the college educated ones tend to look down on those that graduated from a private university or acheived other great successes. It goes back to the whole conformist herd mentality and the constant pulling out of the scales. The odd thing about KC is that the social culture has changed over time with the influx of transplants from the Southwest (California, Texas, Arizona, etc). KC was more alligned with Indy in terms of social culture 20-30 years ago, but today exhibits more "Sunbelt" chracteristics in the attitudes of many that are under age 30, the built environment, and even the layout of neighborhoods (JOCO).
I'm happy for you that you escaped the suffocating midwestern culture of KC for the open, welcoming and sophisticated culture of New Hampshire.

It's great our country affords so many the ability to relocate to the areas of the country in which they are most comfortable.

Last edited by MUTGR; 02-22-2012 at 01:07 PM..
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:43 PM
 
6,109 posts, read 10,390,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MUTGR View Post
You should tell them about your impressive family background back east and your important friends in government.

That should work well with the friendly midwestern women in KC.
Why bother. They are too wrapped up into trying to act like they are something that they actually are not. The less these morons in the KC area know about me, the better.
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:47 PM
 
6,109 posts, read 10,390,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MUTGR View Post
I'm happy for you that you escaped the suffocating midwestern culture of KC for the open, welcoming and sophisticated culture of New Hampshire.

It's great our country affords so many the ability to relocate to the areas of the country in which they are most comfortable.
He's a Midwestern guy that happens to have a good grasp on what the KC area is about. And apparently he likes New Hampshire too.

Actually most of southeastern and south central NH is becoming an extended suburban region of Bawston. Thus, it is a safe bet that the culture in that part of the state has certainly changed from an agrarian, small town New England culture to one of executives and white collar professionals.
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,804 posts, read 16,276,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RonnieJonez View Post

Also, my posts are not centered around self-pandering unlike the majority of you who just rep each other all day long. Among you guys it's sort of like exchanging back massages whenever someone praises Indy, lol.
Speaking of which, my back has been bothering me. Someone say something nice about downtown Indianapolis to ease my pain.
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,894 posts, read 5,231,808 times
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Originally Posted by Toxic Toast View Post
Speaking of which, my back has been bothering me. Someone say something nice about downtown Indianapolis to ease my pain.
Downtown Indianapolis was praised highly by the Media during Super Bowl 46.
Everyone enjoyed Indianapolis's compact downtown containing a vast majority of the Amendities our Great City has to offer. Its all in once place: Downtown Indianapolis, Indiana.
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Old 02-22-2012, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Floyd County, IN
25,295 posts, read 43,212,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
He's a Midwestern guy that happens to have a good grasp on what the KC area is about. And apparently he likes New Hampshire too.

Actually most of southeastern and south central NH is becoming an extended suburban region of Bawston. Thus, it is a safe bet that the culture in that part of the state has certainly changed from an agrarian, small town New England culture to one of executives and white collar professionals.
That is true, particularly in Rockingham county. Actually any area of southern NH is commutable to very high paying jobs in Massachusetts, particularly the I-495 tech corridor. Southern NH tends to attract more transplants from MA that are fiscally conservative as a result. However, WILWRadio, if you examine the percentage growth in population in all counties in NH over the past 10 years it is less than the national average. Between 2010-2011 NH population only increased by around 1,700 people. NH maintains its rural identity and I know many people who seek out smaller towns over larger towns. Grafton, Carroll, Belknap, Sullivan, Merrimack, Strafford, Hillsborough, and Rockingham all had growth rates in the 6-9.5% range so it is surprisingly evenly distributed. One of my favorite towns in NH has only 720 people. I won't give the name of the town out or everyone would want to move there.
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Old 02-23-2012, 07:42 AM
 
6,109 posts, read 10,390,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
That is true, particularly in Rockingham county. Actually any area of southern NH is commutable to very high paying jobs in Massachusetts, particularly the I-495 tech corridor. Southern NH tends to attract more transplants from MA that are fiscally conservative as a result. However, WILWRadio, if you examine the percentage growth in population in all counties in NH over the past 10 years it is less than the national average. Between 2010-2011 NH population only increased by around 1,700 people. NH maintains its rural identity and I know many people who seek out smaller towns over larger towns. Grafton, Carroll, Belknap, Sullivan, Merrimack, Strafford, Hillsborough, and Rockingham all had growth rates in the 6-9.5% range so it is surprisingly evenly distributed. One of my favorite towns in NH has only 720 people. I won't give the name of the town out or everyone would want to move there.
Correct. The northern 2/3rds of the state and virtually the entire western half of New Hamster are still quite rural. I think Keene is the biggest city in the western part of the state and that has only around 23,000 people.

Growth rates in New England are usually lower than the national average. I think a lot of this has to do with the stigma attached to dying mill towns and manufacturing moving out of the region. High taxes and the cost of living also have something to do with this as well.

I guess this is what makes areas like Indianapolis appealing though to so many people. You get a lot of house for the money and taxes are lower than many areas of the country.
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Old 02-23-2012, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,894 posts, read 5,231,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Correct. The northern 2/3rds of the state and virtually the entire western half of New Hamster are still quite rural. I think Keene is the biggest city in the western part of the state and that has only around 23,000 people.

Growth rates in New England are usually lower than the national average. I think a lot of this has to do with the stigma attached to dying mill towns and manufacturing moving out of the region. High taxes and the cost of living also have something to do with this as well.

I guess this is what makes areas like Indianapolis appealing though to so many people. You get a lot of house for the money and taxes are lower than many areas of the country.
actually Indianapolis has the nations most affordable housing market.
And fundamentally that makes sense.
places like chicago have lake Michigan blocking expansion east.
Indianapolis can expand in any direction and farmland is easy to convert into suburban development.
Also since Indiana's property taxes are capped at 1% it makes it easier to get a bigger home and still afford it.
An example i always remember in Illinois a 200,000$ home can run over 10k a year in property taxes. thats 5%. here in Indiana its capped at 1% so 2k a year. 8,000$ a year in savings just on 1 tax.
Then add in a cost of living thats 15% lower than the national average theres quite a few reasons people choose Indianapolis for affordability.
i like to use this phrase: The Dollar goes farther in Indy.
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Old 02-23-2012, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Floyd County, IN
25,295 posts, read 43,212,336 times
Reputation: 18045
Quote:
Originally Posted by WILWRadio View Post
Correct. The northern 2/3rds of the state and virtually the entire western half of New Hamster are still quite rural. I think Keene is the biggest city in the western part of the state and that has only around 23,000 people.

Growth rates in New England are usually lower than the national average. I think a lot of this has to do with the stigma attached to dying mill towns and manufacturing moving out of the region. High taxes and the cost of living also have something to do with this as well.

I guess this is what makes areas like Indianapolis appealing though to so many people. You get a lot of house for the money and taxes are lower than many areas of the country.
You are definitely right about the mill town stigma as most mill towns in NH do not have the tax base to support continued increased spending for most things. Claremont now has an equalized tax rate of $33 per $1,000 assessed value which is complete insanity. Keene is at $30, Lebanon at $25, etc. The lowest rates are by the big lake with Moultonboro at $8 so definitely a huge range.

Yes, you can get quite a bit of house for the money in Indy Some areas I would avoid would be Martinsville, on the SW side of the metro. I think that area would be too dysfunctional for your liking and far too similar to the negatives of Missouri. I tend to like the north and northwest sides of Indy the best. Hamilton county actually appeals to me even though it is suburban because it doesn't have nearly the quantity of flashy pretentious sunbelt influences that KC has and the people are just more friendly overall.
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