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Old 08-02-2012, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,900 posts, read 2,099,193 times
Reputation: 957

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Quote:
Originally Posted by timothyaw View Post
Keep looking, nothing to see here; there are better areas to relocate to.
troll somewhere else.
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Old 08-02-2012, 03:49 PM
 
2,749 posts, read 2,233,871 times
Reputation: 1239
Quote:
Originally Posted by timothyaw View Post
Keep looking, nothing to see here; there are better areas to relocate to.
Crab effect?
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Old 08-02-2012, 04:10 PM
 
583 posts, read 430,458 times
Reputation: 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by davepergola View Post
Third, is the "east end" really as bad as all of the conjecture I read states? What exactly is the "east end" coming from an outsider? Is it a certain point in Indianapolis where everything goes to hell, or is it a natural boundary and everything east of it just isn't great?

Thanks in advance guys, and maybe I'll join your ranks soon!
The East Side is dingy and run-down. In the Midwest, we have "sides," not "ends," since our land doesn't end for hundreds of miles. Property taxes are low. Governmental involvement in your life is relatively low.

Indy's better than a lot of places, particularly Pittsburgh.

Living in Indy is typically easy and comfortable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by timothyaw View Post
Keep looking, nothing to see here; there are better areas to relocate to.
And many, many worse ones. It's easy to make a bad choice. Indy's better than many other options. He could do far worse.
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Old 08-02-2012, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Raccoon City
582 posts, read 425,777 times
Reputation: 798
I'm in my twenties and just moved to Indy as well. I have to say that I like it so far. However, I moved from Kansas so I'm used to the Midwest vibe. Prices seem to be reasonable: schools, rent, food (Indy doesn't tax all its food). Are you a college student or a degree holder? I'm here to get a degree, so basically I have to take lower end jobs because I'm part-time. There seems to be a decent amount of job offerings. I managed to get a job with my school within a month of living here.

Have you been to Indy before? Nothing subs for visiting. Some like it, some don't. The one thing I wish is, even though it is difficult, I would've found a job prior to moving to cut out on the stress of finding a job, and dwindling funds. A job at the start would've kept me busy (and less homesick), and gotten me involved with the community. For awhile the only thing I went downtown for was to sight see, and eat.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:28 PM
 
583 posts, read 430,458 times
Reputation: 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by thefallensrvnge View Post
I'm in my twenties and just moved to Indy as well. I have to say that I like it so far. However, I moved from Kansas so I'm used to the Midwest vibe. Prices seem to be reasonable: schools, rent, food (Indy doesn't tax all its food). Are you a college student or a degree holder? I'm here to get a degree, so basically I have to take lower end jobs because I'm part-time. There seems to be a decent amount of job offerings. I managed to get a job with my school within a month of living here.

Have you been to Indy before? Nothing subs for visiting. Some like it, some don't. The one thing I wish is, even though it is difficult, I would've found a job prior to moving to cut out on the stress of finding a job, and dwindling funds. A job at the start would've kept me busy (and less homesick), and gotten me involved with the community. For awhile the only thing I went downtown for was to sight see, and eat.
Don't feel too badly. Almost always, if you want to get a job somewhere, you have to move there. Sometimes, it works out where you can find a job before moving, but too many people end up not moving where they want because they don't have a job in their desired city.
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:00 PM
 
4,006 posts, read 3,482,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregHenry View Post
Don't feel too badly. Almost always, if you want to get a job somewhere, you have to move there. Sometimes, it works out where you can find a job before moving, but too many people end up not moving where they want because they don't have a job in their desired city.

In 2007 when I lived in another state and planned to move here I emailed my CV around so that I could have a job before I moved. For one thing, it made it easier to get a mortgage, especially since I hadn't yet sold my home there. After I accepted that job I moved here into my new house and then put the old house up for sale.

I ended up keeping that job for six months until I was able to find a job that was a better fit for my skill set. Career Builder and LinkedIn make it a little easier to find a job in the area where you want to relocate.
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Old 08-02-2012, 08:24 PM
 
583 posts, read 430,458 times
Reputation: 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by missik999 View Post
In 2007 when I lived in another state and planned to move here I emailed my CV around so that I could have a job before I moved. For one thing, it made it easier to get a mortgage, especially since I hadn't yet sold my home there. After I accepted that job I moved here into my new house and then put the old house up for sale.

I ended up keeping that job for six months until I was able to find a job that was a better fit for my skill set. Career Builder and LinkedIn make it a little easier to find a job in the area where you want to relocate.
It certainly doesn't hurt, but most people won't be able to line up a job in another city.

It's far more important to live where you want than to wait around for a job to open in that other city.
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Old 08-02-2012, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
2,345 posts, read 1,488,257 times
Reputation: 1852
When I was looking to move Indy, I never seemed to get callbacks for jobs I was completely qualified for. My parents who already lived here suggested I just put their address on my resume since companies might overlook me since I lived 3 hours away. I ended up getting a job through my brother-in-law.
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Old 08-03-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Petoskey, MI
105 posts, read 73,273 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by davepergola View Post
Hello,

I will start off this (admittedly long) thread by first saying, Indianapolis has me completely intrigued. I have some unknown fixation on this city, and I can't really explain it, all I can say is that I am nearly positive that I want to live here. I currently live in Connecticut, which was recently given the ever-so-prestigious title of "The most expensive place to live" in the 48 landlocked states. That being said, in my 20's, I do not currently own the place that I reside in and I am looking for a less expensive place to live. My skill-set allows me to work pretty much anywhere, so I am not worried about finding employment, and I understand I probably won't bring home the $55K a year I make here.

All of that being said, I am looking to relocate and Indianapolis has caught my eye. I am not currently interested in buying without living in the city first, but I do have various questions.

First, most pressing question: I was reading on some forums and someone wrote that the mill rate for Indianapolis is OVER 100 points? Is this true? Is that the value that is charged against all property? Where I live, I pay taxes on my vehicle yearly, and home owners pay yearly taxes of the same rate on their houses. It is about 35 points here, or $35 per $1000 of assumed value. That puts on the homeowner on the line for $3500 for every $100,000 that their home is worth, in a place where house values regularly go above $200,000. I am 100% not interested in paying 1/5th of my yearly salary in additional taxes. If anyone is a resident of Indianapolis proper (or suburbs, Avon, Carmel, etc) can you please help me understand the effective tax rate on motor vehicles (if you have one taxes on those yearly) and housing? I'd rather settle down in the next few years, so it will become a huge deal to me in the future.

Second, how is the local economy? Is the unemployment rate high? Are people fighting for whatever jobs open up in the area? Are there certain industries that you can think of off the top of your head that are under-served and over-served?

Third, is the "east end" really as bad as all of the conjecture I read states? What exactly is the "east end" coming from an outsider? Is it a certain point in Indianapolis where everything goes to hell, or is it a natural boundary and everything east of it just isn't great?

Thanks in advance guys, and maybe I'll join your ranks soon!
To the OP, you ripped the thoughts right out of my mind. I too want to relocate after getting my bachelors, and after looking at several locations, I kept getting pulled back to Indianapolis for some unknown reason. So far my research is coming up pretty good, and I have to say my gut feeling is telling me that this city will be what I call home. I just have to have faith I can find work when the time comes.
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Old 08-04-2012, 10:27 AM
 
9 posts, read 10,550 times
Reputation: 10
Thanks for all of the insight guys. One more question, for those who live in suburbia, how is the commute to work if you work in the city? I believe Indianapolis has a beltway system, right? There's nothing like that around here (too forested, hilly and poorly laid out for such a thing). Is it easy to commute inwards and outwards as needed? Or is it as bad as somewhere like Atlanta which can take upwards of an hour in and out just to go a few miles.

Also, how is public transportation? Do you have a subway or rail system, or do you rely on bus/taxi to get around if you have no vehicle? I fully intend on bringing two cars with me, but I am mostly curious.
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