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Old 06-23-2017, 11:48 AM
 
Location: SF
96 posts, read 156,882 times
Reputation: 48

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Hi everyone,

We've spent the last 10 yrs in San Francisco and dh now has the option to transfer either to the Indy office or the Triangle location. We're looking for a better quality of life/COL as well as a more relaxed pace of living and friendly people. Our max budget is 400k for a 3 bdrm sfh in an area with good schools and good SpEd programs (ds is mainstreamed with extra support and gets ST). Dh would be working in NW Indianapolis.

We love quiet, nature, and mature trees (would ideally want wooded type areas but I understand those don't really exist there) and also areas with some character. We aren't really strip mall or chain restaurant types. Dh is European, I'm originally from Chicago (but no longer have family there). We're in our 40s and son will be in 2nd grade next year.

What areas might be suggested for us? Are there any? Or should we look harder at Raleigh-Durham?

Thank you for any help!
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Old 06-23-2017, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Not the end of the Earth, but I can see it from here
4,419 posts, read 4,663,063 times
Reputation: 4615
Having lived in the Bay Area (San Bruno & Montara) I can assure you that it will definitely be a much slower pace. And there are trees, plenty of them.

A lot of people go through northern Indiana and think it's all cornfields and flat Earth. Get down around Indianapolis and farther south and you're touching the very northern parts of the Appalachians. You would have no problem finding a wooded lot in the area.

That being said, if you don't like chain restaurants, move on to the Triangle. Much more vibrant and eclectic, but more expensive, too.

$400k will get you a pretty decent McMansion in Indy. It won't go as far in the Triangle.

The Triangle will have better weather, especially when it comes to winter.

Given the choice, I would go Raleigh-Durham. It will cost more, but it's a better place in my opinion and based on what you asked for. Plenty of trees there, too.

RM
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Old 06-23-2017, 04:32 PM
 
3,884 posts, read 10,194,385 times
Reputation: 7848
Just visited a home on the NW side that was like a huge tree house. The whole area it was in was wooded. West of 71st and Lafayette Road. Normandy Farms but in the wooded section. But dont know the age range of those living there. With young kids, I would be really interested in the age range of the area. Mibor.com will give you loads of search info on areas you are interested in.

We were transferred to the Triangle for 3 years.
1. Taxes were more.
2. I felt the constantly growing suburbs were not the best fit. If I returned, I would be looking in Chapel Hill if possible.
3. Traffic was much heavier than in Indy.
4. Greater % of students in Triangle area. Husband felt it had a college feel.
5. Easier to get to the mountains or the beach in the Triangle.
6. While there we got 2 feet of snow that closed the whole area for almost 2 weeks and had hurricane warnings. Here you get tornado warnings.

I love love love the grid streets and ease of getting around Indy (just got back from Pittsburgh.) We had to do a lot more driving in the Triangle.

I think Indy has more than enough interesting restaurants now. We continue to live here because we are now involved in many charitable groups and have friends we dont want to leave.
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Old 06-24-2017, 12:53 PM
 
Location: SF
96 posts, read 156,882 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by MortonR View Post
Having lived in the Bay Area (San Bruno & Montara) I can assure you that it will definitely be a much slower pace. And there are trees, plenty of them.

A lot of people go through northern Indiana and think it's all cornfields and flat Earth. Get down around Indianapolis and farther south and you're touching the very northern parts of the Appalachians. You would have no problem finding a wooded lot in the area.

That being said, if you don't like chain restaurants, move on to the Triangle. Much more vibrant and eclectic, but more expensive, too.

$400k will get you a pretty decent McMansion in Indy. It won't go as far in the Triangle.

The Triangle will have better weather, especially when it comes to winter.

Given the choice, I would go Raleigh-Durham. It will cost more, but it's a better place in my opinion and based on what you asked for. Plenty of trees there, too.

RM
Thanks for the feedback! Are you originally from Indiana or a transplant? I read on another thread that preference is given to Indiana natives over non-natives? I know there is quite the influx of transplants in the Triangle which maybe would make us feel less like outsiders, if that was the case.

Honestly, we're neither chain restaurant nor McMansion people. Is there anywhere there that would fit us that has ok schools or would it be forcing a fit that doesn't really work?

I'm actually a fan of snowy winters so no worries on that end. It doesn't seem like it gets as arctic as Chicago, does it? We would be happy with snow, esp our son.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetana3 View Post
Just visited a home on the NW side that was like a huge tree house. The whole area it was in was wooded. West of 71st and Lafayette Road. Normandy Farms but in the wooded section. But dont know the age range of those living there. With young kids, I would be really interested in the age range of the area. Mibor.com will give you loads of search info on areas you are interested in.

We were transferred to the Triangle for 3 years.
1. Taxes were more.
2. I felt the constantly growing suburbs were not the best fit. If I returned, I would be looking in Chapel Hill if possible.
3. Traffic was much heavier than in Indy.
4. Greater % of students in Triangle area. Husband felt it had a college feel.
5. Easier to get to the mountains or the beach in the Triangle.
6. While there we got 2 feet of snow that closed the whole area for almost 2 weeks and had hurricane warnings. Here you get tornado warnings.

I love love love the grid streets and ease of getting around Indy (just got back from Pittsburgh.) We had to do a lot more driving in the Triangle.

I think Indy has more than enough interesting restaurants now. We continue to live here because we are now involved in many charitable groups and have friends we dont want to leave.
You know, I was looking at that area and couldn't get over the school ratings as well as district rating. It is located in Indianapolis but the addresses there go to Pike Township schools which are rated quite low(?). It looks like a nice, quiet area but I couldn't get past the schools being that bad. I'm sort of confused by the different school districts within the city itself (Pike, Lawrence, Washington, Indianapolis) and why they
have different districts within one city.

Yes, we have looked at Chapel Hill but it is so pricey and the inventory so low for our budget... I know it's the IN board but what was Hillsborough like? It looks ok but then I see the crime stats and am confused!

We love ethnic restaurants and avoid the chains. I've tried looking at north Indy but almost everytime I find a house the school has an abysmal rating.
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Old 06-24-2017, 01:14 PM
 
3,884 posts, read 10,194,385 times
Reputation: 7848
As most corporate relocation specialists say, Carmel, Zionsville and some of Fishers are the place to be with the biggest number of transplants and a very stable set of school systems. Choose the school area and then choose the house. These areas have the highest income level of the whole area. I only pointed out the Traders Point area due to the wooded nature and did say there were not a huge number of kids in evidence.

If you plan on living here for a long long time, then take a look at the high schools but a lot can change in the years till you will need any. Zionsville and the older areas are pretty nice with a "cute" downtown to walk around in and close to the NW where your husband will be working. Working back east is Carmel/Clay and there will be huge numbers of houses to look at and compare. Farthest from the area of your husband's job is Fishers.

Note to those who also suggest Brownsburg, Greenwood, etc. I suggest Zionsville due to shortness of commute. No sense in spending time in a car when you can spend time with the family.
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Old 06-24-2017, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Not the end of the Earth, but I can see it from here
4,419 posts, read 4,663,063 times
Reputation: 4615
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fata Morgana View Post
Thanks for the feedback! Are you originally from Indiana or a transplant? I read on another thread that preference is given to Indiana natives over non-natives? I know there is quite the influx of transplants in the Triangle which maybe would make us feel less like outsiders, if that was the case.

Honestly, we're neither chain restaurant nor McMansion people. Is there anywhere there that would fit us that has ok schools or would it be forcing a fit that doesn't really work?

I'm actually a fan of snowy winters so no worries on that end. It doesn't seem like it gets as arctic as Chicago, does it? We would be happy with snow, esp our son.
I grew up in Indianapolis, left there about 30 years ago, returned about ten years ago, came to my senses, and left again. I still have family there who have lived there all of their lives that I regularly visit.

I'm not sure what you mean by "preference"?

It's not the snow that would concern me, it's the lack of sunlight. It will totally mess with your mind depending on what part of the Bay Area you live in. If you live in the East Bay or South Bay, it will mess you up because you're used to seeing the sun on a fairly regular basis. You can easily go a week or more in the winter and never see blue sky. And snow won't be an issue, the cold will be. January and February can be very Arctic depending on the weather. If you get the Alberta Clippers at that time of the year single digits and lower are certainly possible.

I'm not criticizing - just stating the facts. There are four very distinct seasons in the Midwest. Fall is by far my favorite. I can't say I care much for the other three.

RM
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Old 06-24-2017, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
2,091 posts, read 1,053,712 times
Reputation: 5128
I moved here from sunny Denver. The cold, cloudy winters don't bother me--I put on wool socks and insulated boots and carry on.

From your description of what you're looking for, I think Indianapolis would be a good fit for you. The people here are generally friendly, relaxed and down-to-earth, and there are lots of wooded areas within the city limits. The area around Eagle Creek Park or Holliday Park might float your boat.

I don't have kids, but you might look at individual school ratings rather than entire districts.
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Old 06-26-2017, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Carmel
157 posts, read 139,849 times
Reputation: 164
Considering your husband would be working on the NW side, definitely look into Zionsville and Carmel. Both have highly rated schools. And Indy has all kinds of local/non-chain restaurants with more opening all the time. Too many people on here give the lazy answer and only talk about chain rest. Even downtown Zionsville has several local restaurants in its downtown area.
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Old 06-26-2017, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
3,302 posts, read 3,979,745 times
Reputation: 6678
"Get down around Indianapolis and farther south and you're touching the very northern parts of the Appalachians".....sorry, those mountains are nowhere near hooterville....there are no mountains in hooterville, I've lived in that area...they are just rolling hills.

Hoosier Hill is the highest natural point in the state of Indiana at 1,257 feet. Geologically, the hill sits in the Dearborn Upland, an area of high terrain in southeast Indiana that sits on top of the geologic structure known as the Cincinnati Arch. However, Hoosier Hill is located in a portion of the upland buried underneath glacial debris known as the Tipton Till Plain. As a result, while the average elevation of this upland region is 1100 +/-100 feet above sea level, the topographic relief is gentle where the "hill" is no more than 30 feet higher than the surrounding landscape of gently rolling farmland.

However, there are plenty of forests/wooded areas south of India-no-place.

Coming from CA, I'd pay close attention to the political/ideological climate of either place. Ca is on one end of the spectrum, IN and NC are a toss up (IMO) as to which is the farthest from CA. Also, Indy can be bitter cold in winter, NC, not so much. By bitter cold, I am comparing Bay Area (lived there too) winters, not International Falls bitter cold.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 06-26-2017, 06:29 PM
 
1 posts, read 649 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fata Morgana View Post
Hi everyone,

We've spent the last 10 yrs in San Francisco and dh now has the option to transfer either to the Indy office or the Triangle location. We're looking for a better quality of life/COL as well as a more relaxed pace of living and friendly people. Our max budget is 400k for a 3 bdrm sfh in an area with good schools and good SpEd programs (ds is mainstreamed with extra support and gets ST). Dh would be working in NW Indianapolis.

We love quiet, nature, and mature trees (would ideally want wooded type areas but I understand those don't really exist there) and also areas with some character. We aren't really strip mall or chain restaurant types. Dh is European, I'm originally from Chicago (but no longer have family there). We're in our 40s and son will be in 2nd grade next year.

What areas might be suggested for us? Are there any? Or should we look harder at Raleigh-Durham?

Thank you for any help!
I just moved to Indy from Los Angeles 2 months ago and I highly recommend this city. The quality of life here is remarkable and it was a big upgrade from LA. The traffic here is an utter joke and my disponsible income is double in Indy. The food scene surprised me considering Indys size.
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