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Old 06-17-2019, 10:42 PM
 
Location: 78745
3,735 posts, read 2,889,062 times
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The so-called "industrial age" is supposedly over with and we are now living in what is being called "the information age". Now-a-days, it seems the companies are looking for employees with more brains than brawn.

That's why I think the major population growth for the next 50 to 60 years is going to be mostly in large cities and college towns that have a major university, because so many of these major companies want to be located in the cities where the smartest people in the state are.

It's already happening. So many of these college towns all across the country that were maybe 20,000 to 30,000 in the 1960's, and now many of those same cities are approaching 100,000 population and are among the fastest growing cities in their state. Off of the top of my head, West Lafayette and Bloomington in Indiana, Columbia, Missouri, Fayetteville, Arkansas, Boulder, Colorado, and Ann Arbor, Michigan, just to name a few.

Bloomington, West Lafayette, Muncie and Terre Haute should be ok, but I wonder what will become of towns like Marion and Logansport.

Last edited by Ivory Lee Spurlock; 06-17-2019 at 10:57 PM..
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Old 06-18-2019, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,453 posts, read 22,354,512 times
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Even towns like Bloomington aren't going to hit critical mass to be able to get large amounts of these white collar jobs.

Bloomington with be fine as a major university town, but Terre Haute and Muncie, I'm not so sure. Sure, there are universities there, but they are kind of also rans.

Muncie is going to continue shifting away from the industrial base with Ball State becoming an even more important economic center.

The northern office parks of Indy that are employing large #s of these white collar people will likely get larger and even more important.
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Old 06-18-2019, 11:27 PM
 
Location: SoCal, but itching to relocate
1,209 posts, read 563,246 times
Reputation: 1723
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
The lack of scenery hasn't stopped people from moving to eastern Colorado, Texas, Arizona, Las Vegas or Atlanta. Nor has natural beauty kept people in upstate New York, West Virginia or coastal California. It's a factor for some people, of course, but a good living and the prospect of a good future is more important for most.
^^^Exactly! Especially when you're married and raising kids.
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Old 06-18-2019, 11:33 PM
 
Location: SoCal, but itching to relocate
1,209 posts, read 563,246 times
Reputation: 1723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The northern office parks of Indy that are employing large #s of these white collar people will likely get larger and even more important.
I agree with this statement. And, for better or worse, that area reminds me a bit of Irvine, California from 35 years ago!

Last edited by ImmerLernen; 06-19-2019 at 12:01 AM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 06-19-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
909 posts, read 1,493,150 times
Reputation: 946
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
The so-called "industrial age" is supposedly over with and we are now living in what is being called "the information age". Now-a-days, it seems the companies are looking for employees with more brains than brawn.

That's why I think the major population growth for the next 50 to 60 years is going to be mostly in large cities and college towns that have a major university, because so many of these major companies want to be located in the cities where the smartest people in the state are.

It's already happening. So many of these college towns all across the country that were maybe 20,000 to 30,000 in the 1960's, and now many of those same cities are approaching 100,000 population and are among the fastest growing cities in their state. Off of the top of my head, West Lafayette and Bloomington in Indiana, Columbia, Missouri, Fayetteville, Arkansas, Boulder, Colorado, and Ann Arbor, Michigan, just to name a few.

Bloomington, West Lafayette, Muncie and Terre Haute should be ok, but I wonder what will become of towns like Marion and Logansport.
Good points, however i guess one counter-point would be that more people are working remote than ever with high-speed Internet and many companies relaxing their policies about telecommuting. In my company, we have quiet a few that live all over the place.
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Old 06-20-2019, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,453 posts, read 22,354,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImmerLernen View Post
I agree with this statement. And, for better or worse, that area reminds me a bit of Irvine, California from 35 years ago!
I worked off 96th St. and at Keystone at the Crossing at a major park there. The traffic in and out of those areas notably increased when I lived there from 2014 to 2016. I'm assuming it will just get worse over time. The last job I had there was off 116th/69 in Fishers. That place was a complete circus then and I'm sure it's worse now with the IKEA.

My barber said it would end up like Atlanta and he's probably not too far off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by W & C View Post
Good points, however i guess one counter-point would be that more people are working remote than ever with high-speed Internet and many companies relaxing their policies about telecommuting. In my company, we have quiet a few that live all over the place.
I haven't seen that at all - in fact, many companies seem to be recalling telecommuters to the office. I work for one of the largest employees in my local area. Telecommuting is effectively prohibited. There are no reasons why we can't work remotely other than that's not the corporate culture. Most places value "butt-in-seat" time more than being highly productive wherever you may be.
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Old 06-20-2019, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
909 posts, read 1,493,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post


I haven't seen that at all - in fact, many companies seem to be recalling telecommuters to the office. I work for one of the largest employees in my local area. Telecommuting is effectively prohibited. There are no reasons why we can't work remotely other than that's not the corporate culture. Most places value "butt-in-seat" time more than being highly productive wherever you may be.
I've seen the opposite where I am.

And I googled to see what the trend is. This source seems to be somewhat legit without an agenda:

https://globalworkplaceanalytics.com...ing-statistics

Quote:
Summary of telecommuting trends:

Regular work-at-home, among the non-self-employed population, has grown by 140% since 2005, nearly 10x faster than the rest of the workforce or the self-employed.
4.3 million employees (3.2% of the workforce) now work from home at least half the time.
From 2015 to 1016:
The employee population as a whole (not including work-at-home) grew by .9% from 2015 to 2016.
The self-employed population grew by 2.4% (not including home-based) and the home-based self-employed population grew by 7.3%.*
Almost all of the growth in self-employment since 2005 is among the home-based incorporated businesses (up 43% from 2005 to 2016)
The telecommuter population grew by 11.7%, the largest year over year growth since 2008.
Forty percent more U.S. employers offered flexible workplace options than they did five years ago. Still, only 7% make it available to most of their employees.
Larger companies are most likely to offer telecommuting options to most of their employees.
New England and Mid-Atlantic region employers are the most likely to offer telecommuting options.
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Old 06-20-2019, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
2,108 posts, read 1,076,487 times
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My previous employer did more telecommuting than my current one. One team was scattered across the country. One of the partners said, "What am I going to do, tell them all to move to Denver?"

That said, I don't think telecommuting has become as popular as people thought it would ten years ago.
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Old 06-20-2019, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
29,453 posts, read 22,354,512 times
Reputation: 36558
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
My previous employer did more telecommuting than my current one. One team was scattered across the country. One of the partners said, "What am I going to do, tell them all to move to Denver?"

That said, I don't think telecommuting has become as popular as people thought it would ten years ago.
It was supposed to be the salvation of rural, downtrodden areas like where I am.

Two federal contractors built major offices about fifty miles from here in rural southwest VA back in 2008 or so. They had at least a ten year property tax abatement. Builders built a lot of nice housing in what was otherwise rural coal country in preparation for the IT influx.

The jobs that came were lower end and now there are tons of condos and such on the market as the projects fizzled out.

This is a beautiful townhome with higher end finishes, etc., but won't sell thirty minutes from the nearest community hospital and no employment centers nearby. Dining is basically limited to fast food and an Applebee's.


https://www.realtor.com/realestatean...-57041?view=qv

The companies never allowed much telecommuting. True telecommuting could allow communities like Lebanon to flourish, but most places still demand an office presence.
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Old 06-21-2019, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis Indiana
1,164 posts, read 3,398,713 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
When I left in 2015, it took me almost an hour to get to work 7 miles away on the bus. Even though I lived within a mile of Englewood Station, using the light rail would have taken just as long, if not longer. If you've taken public transportation during rush hour, you've seen that it's packed. I had coworkers who didn't bother heading home between 4 PM and 6 PM. Unless they've added more lanes or buses in Denver, I can only imagine it's gotten worse. My 20-mile commute here--which would be untenable in Denver--takes me 45 minutes through rush-hour traffic.
ABC's 20/20 did a report about "road rage" a while ago. They zeroed in on the Denver area because the traffic problem is soooo bad.
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