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Old 01-02-2010, 02:52 PM
 
4,176 posts, read 5,301,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austiNati View Post
Indianapolis should focus on buillding strictly dense, walkable, pedestrian friendly areas to fill in the large "gaps" in the city. There are many large open plots of land all over the city. These should be utilized while they still exist (indy is a younger city) Town Squares, Plazas and Towne Centers would work awesome in Indy. The best thing about that place is that even though it's very suburban in nature, it wouldnt be hard to densify because there is soooooo much land. You would'nt even need to tear down existing housing. As of now, the place is tooooooooooo car oriented and all over the place.

I agree in theory, but each city has its design and landscape. I don't know this for a fact but, based on how it looks now, it seems as though Indy wasn never really designed with the urban/walkable vibe in mind. If it was designed this way, then the designers did a miserable job.

Honestly, it would be great if the city could become more walkable and ped-friendly but the area is spread out, spacious and has horrible public transit. I don't see this changing.

Density means a lot of stuff per unit of land. If there is a lot of land as there is in and around Indy, it's hard to get big increased in density. One thing Manhattan has for increasing its density is an area of 27-30 square miles!
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Old 01-02-2010, 08:19 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 3,492,494 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austiNati View Post
Indianapolis should focus on buillding strictly dense, walkable, pedestrian friendly areas to fill in the large "gaps" in the city. There are many large open plots of land all over the city. These should be utilized while they still exist (indy is a younger city) Town Squares, Plazas and Towne Centers would work awesome in Indy. The best thing about that place is that even though it's very suburban in nature, it wouldnt be hard to densify because there is soooooo much land. You would'nt even need to tear down existing housing. As of now, the place is tooooooooooo car oriented and all over the place.
I agree it's too car oriented, but I don't believe there are as many large, open plots of land as you think, certainly not much that isn't already privately owned. I guess it depends on what you mean by "large." There are a lot of vacant lots in Center Township, but that's because there's no demand for the property.
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Old 02-28-2010, 01:10 PM
 
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I live in Watson McCord, a subdivision of Mapleton Fall Creek near the State Fairgrounds. My 1920's house is just 2 blocks from the Monon Trail and 1 block from the Greenway Trail. My family rides bikes regularly via the Monon to downtown/Cultural Trail and also to Broadripple and Nora area. There are several grocery stores on the way north, Whole Foods, Fresh Market and other banks, a library, and businesses. My neighborhood is growing more stable and improving economically, lots of homes for sale near $100K but that is changing quickly.
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Old 02-28-2010, 03:59 PM
 
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If you lived in many of the spots along 86th street east and west of Meridian, you could walk to almost anything. If in the apartments close to Westfield, there is the library, numerous grocery stores, Target, specialty stores, Monon Trail, etc. And there are sidewalks all along the road on both sides I think. Broad Ripple by 62nd and Keystone area is perhaps one of the best walkable areas. All the shopping needed along with the commercial area at College. These spots are few and far between.

Also at 86th and Ditch there is a whole corner with most including grocery, restaurants, new drug stores, Starbucks, etc. All within a two block area.

Indy was walkable early in its history when the trolley lines and bus lines ran all over. Neighborhood shops where at most of the corners and supported and were supported by their neighborhoods.

Then the car explosion took hold and the trolley tracks were covered because the car was considered "so much easier". I remember gas at 25 or so cents per gallon.
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Old 02-28-2010, 05:41 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
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Broad ripple and areas around the Monon Trail, especially around downtown - that's about it.

Indianapolis is unlikely to ever be a pedestrian-friendly city because it just does not have the sufficient population density - too much suburban sprawl with lots of room to build. Places like Brooklyn and San Francisco have good pedestrian environments for reasons of geography, which greatly influence city planning and policy.
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Old 03-01-2010, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Hither and thither
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Part of the reason Indy has such a low population density is because of regulations that prohibit otherwise. It's amazing how many great old buildings (from before the days of the car) are sitting vacant in the older parts of Indy, almost entirely because the parking requirement kills any chance of renovation. Developers would love to sink their teeth into some of those great structures on the near northside but the parking requirement is essentially suburban, with the requirement for tons of off-street spaces, even though the streets allow on-street parking in this area. Stuff like this kills the chances of the city becoming walkable, it hurts the tax base (far fewer people paying into infrastructure improvements than in high-density cities so the ones left foot more of the bill), and it will seriously weaken the arguments for a good mass transit system.

This is one definite example where less regulation would only benefit the city. Carmel's leadership seems to get it and is building dense, walkable neighborhoods. Indy, for the most part, is not. Considering that the city's land area is about 100 sq mi LARGER than Chicago, it's a shame how low density most of it is. We don't need Manhattan (or even Chicago) but do we really want the city to be on par with the southern cities and their complete absence of walkability?
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Old 03-01-2010, 08:48 PM
 
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Meridian-Kessler is very walkable. My husband, daughter and I walk into Broad Ripple for lunch, dinner, walk to Fresh Market or the new produce stand on 54th for groceries, or to a pilates class. I love to walk and have found it one of the few areas in the city I could call home...
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:22 PM
 
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It's fine for you to live in Indianapolis without a car, as long as you think standing in the snow and wait for the bus for an hour and a half or even longer doesn't bother you.
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Old 05-27-2010, 04:42 AM
 
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Winter changes all the rules. Even living downtown, I had to fight to walk to my job 5 blocks away because only about 2 businesses/homes shoveled the sidewalks along the route (thanks Riley Towers for always doing it!!).

Makes me wish for Europe where those along sidewalks thought it was important to make them passable.
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Old 06-06-2010, 08:22 AM
 
240 posts, read 479,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ambient View Post
Broad ripple and areas around the Monon Trail, especially around downtown - that's about it.

Indianapolis is unlikely to ever be a pedestrian-friendly city because it just does not have the sufficient population density - too much suburban sprawl with lots of room to build. Places like Brooklyn and San Francisco have good pedestrian environments for reasons of geography, which greatly influence city planning and policy.
I strongly agree with you there. Although, IMO, San Francisco drivers are pretty discourteous to pedestrians almost as bad as Indianapolis (a city I barely lasted a month in.)
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