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Old 08-25-2010, 07:54 PM
 
12,270 posts, read 9,608,374 times
Reputation: 8036

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My ISP sent me this email:

We are writing as a courtesy to let you know that we have received notification from one or more owners of copyrights claiming that their work has been transmitted over the Internet from your account without their permission. Copyright owners may include motion picture studios, the recording industry or others who produce or distribute legally protected material. A copy of the notice is attached.


And there is more. One of my kids or their friends downloaded a movie over Bit Torrent. Everyone is denying it of course, so everyone is catching equal hell tonight.

Once I calmed down it occurred to me, that after years of teenagers with Internet access, this is the first time this ever happened.

I read the letter a little more carefully and discovered the complainant is BayTSP Inc., on behalf of a large movie conglomerate. I'd never heard of them before, so I googled the company and explored them at this address BayTSP - Piracy Protection For Your Digital Assets

My wife is a writer, and I am perfectly comfortable with the idea of intellectual copyright, but there is something unsettling about BayTSP. They provide something called Early Propagator protection to entertainment companies, and in their own words, BayTSP "Monitors peer to peer networks like Bit Torrent and eDonkey, Usenet, IRC and public FTP sites for the first instances of unauthorized video and audio content, can take action to have them removed and monitor for compliance."

Essentially, they spy on us.

I realize this is a brave new world online, that authors and musicians and the companies that provide these services have to protect themselves, but I find the whole thing creepy and more than a bit depressing. I wonder if anyone is watching the people watching us.
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Old 08-25-2010, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 83,888,766 times
Reputation: 17566
I think there are all sorts of ways to protect your privacy while using torrent sites.

http://www.torrentprivacy.com

Protect Your Privacy When Downloading

Mininova > Best ways to protect privacy on torrents?
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Old 08-25-2010, 08:20 PM
 
28,595 posts, read 40,577,263 times
Reputation: 37216
Any time I found a program like Limewire, Bear, etc on a client computer I recommended to them that they remove it and explained why. I had one client that would not and I was there about once a month cleaning crap off his computers. You would think that a $140 charge every month would convince him to change his ways. Not.
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Old 08-25-2010, 08:25 PM
 
28,595 posts, read 40,577,263 times
Reputation: 37216
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockside View Post
My ISP sent me this email:

We are writing as a courtesy to let you know that we have received notification from one or more owners of copyrights claiming that their work has been transmitted over the Internet from your account without their permission. Copyright owners may include motion picture studios, the recording industry or others who produce or distribute legally protected material. A copy of the notice is attached.


And there is more. One of my kids or their friends downloaded a movie over Bit Torrent. Everyone is denying it of course, so everyone is catching equal hell tonight.

Once I calmed down it occurred to me, that after years of teenagers with Internet access, this is the first time this ever happened.

I read the letter a little more carefully and discovered the complainant is BayTSP Inc., on behalf of a large movie conglomerate. I'd never heard of them before, so I googled the company and explored them at this address BayTSP - Piracy Protection For Your Digital Assets

My wife is a writer, and I am perfectly comfortable with the idea of intellectual copyright, but there is something unsettling about BayTSP. They provide something called Early Propagator protection to entertainment companies, and in their own words, BayTSP "Monitors peer to peer networks like Bit Torrent and eDonkey, Usenet, IRC and public FTP sites for the first instances of unauthorized video and audio content, can take action to have them removed and monitor for compliance."

Essentially, they spy on us.

I realize this is a brave new world online, that authors and musicians and the companies that provide these services have to protect themselves, but I find the whole thing creepy and more than a bit depressing. I wonder if anyone is watching the people watching us.
Well, yeah. If you are downloading copyrighted material and get caught where's your beef? I don't care if it's you your teen, or one of their friends your teen is allowing, it's illegal. Perhaps it's time to monitor you children's use of the Internet more closely.

I saw a police car pulled over on the freeway today with a cop pointing a radar gun at oncoming traffic. Should I be complaining to someone about being spied on?

The actions of this organization only threaten you if you are breaking the law, just like the radar gun wielding cop. Don't break the law and you have no reason to worry about being sued or getting a ticket.
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Old 08-25-2010, 11:17 PM
 
12,270 posts, read 9,608,374 times
Reputation: 8036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
The actions of this organization only threaten you if you are breaking the law, just like the radar gun wielding cop. Don't break the law and you have no reason to worry about being sued or getting a ticket.
Jawhol! I slapped myself silly and now I'm goose-stepping my way to bed (you do realize you are communicating with another adult, right?).
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Old 08-26-2010, 12:20 AM
 
40,161 posts, read 41,766,549 times
Reputation: 16735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockside View Post
Essentially, they spy on us.
If they are monitoring content that you are willfully allowing them to connect to I wouldn't consider it spying.
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Old 08-26-2010, 01:02 AM
 
Location: 10110001010110100
6,385 posts, read 10,839,849 times
Reputation: 5589
This whole thing seems like a setup to me, I mean if it is that illegal or a big o problem, then go after the person/PC that is sharing it not the people downloading it. After all, if you buy a stolen item from a person, the cops can't press charges on you, instead they go after the guy who stole that item in the first place. I dunno that is the way I look at it.

All that 'You got nothing to worry about if you don't break the law' is a meaningless preaching at this point since there is a very fine line between what is considered legal and what is not, too many voices but no one really knows what is right and what is wrong regardless of what law states. After all, the law on this topic is often mandated by corporations who weigh in on the justice system by influencing things to according to their own agenda.

If companies were a lot more reasonable with their pricing, perhaps many people who are using these torrents sites wouldn't think it was worth the hassle, but you are charging around $20 for DVD of movies in this economy and where 90%+ of the movies aren't worth even renting for $1 a day. Same goes for music CDs, if they were selling for half the price, I guarantee majority of the people would prefer to purchase the CDs. I was using MP3 purchasing sites like Amazon because it is very rare where you find an album from an artist you like where all songs are worth paying for, so on an average, from an album with 12 songs, I would only like to buy about half a dozen at the most., costing me about $6. Then buy another dozen from 2-3 more albums of the same band/singer and make my own kickass compilation, costing about $12-$18, where if I had to buy 3-4 CDs where I got my compilation from, it'd cost me $45-$60+.

I don't know what I kind of a point I was trying to make, usually after the first drink I stop making sense so it is amazing I am still typing after finishing my 2nd one. I guess all I am saying is, do whatever the heck your heat desires, I won't preach about what you should do or shouldn't do as I am no Angel myself, just don't talk about it in public and make sure to cover your tracks. I guess the smart hardcore torrent freaks are using their neighbor's unsecured Wi-Fi connection or something like that...

what I don't get it, even if these companies are really monitoring you, how can they prove it that you actually downloaded what they claim, they have to find it on your machine or in your possession. Otherwise it is their word against yours. Even if you commit a crime, their accusations and they claims have to be brought to justice in a legal manner, kind of like the reason why cops need a search warrant to enter your place to search for evidence. If they do not have one, you can tell them to take a hike, same should go for those companies doing the monitoring.

Tek, $140 for a single visit? Damn you are overcharging the guy! Talk about illegal activity...lol.

Last edited by TurcoLoco; 08-26-2010 at 01:10 AM..
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Old 08-26-2010, 10:30 AM
 
40,161 posts, read 41,766,549 times
Reputation: 16735
Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
After all, if you buy a stolen item from a person, the cops can't press charges on you, instead they go after the guy who stole that item in the first place.
Not necessarily, for example if you buy a Corvette for $50 with no title you're going to be charged. The "I didn't know" it was stolen argument isn't going to work.

Quote:
All that 'You got nothing to worry about if you don't break the law' is a meaningless preaching at this point since there is a very fine line between what is considered legal and what is not, too many voices but no one really knows what is right and what is wrong regardless of what law states. After all, the law on this topic is often mandated by corporations who weigh in on the justice system by influencing things to according to their own agenda.
Copyright laws are pretty straight forward, when you create something original it's copyrighted by you the author. For example your post above is copyrighted. The one instance where it wouldn't be is a work for hire when the employer retains copyright.

From there the author can sell the copyright or license his/her product. These are two distinct things. Licensing is what is used to control how it is distributed and the owner of the copyright can set any stipulations they want. Your post for example can be published on these pages because you have granted City Data what is often referred to as soft license when you hit the submit button. Now if they took your post and published it in a book then you'd have grounds to sue.

You can assume that everything is copyrighted and it's your responsibility to determine the status of how it is licensed.
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Old 08-26-2010, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,490 posts, read 52,084,610 times
Reputation: 24642
Big Brother government is annoying. Big Brother Corporation is inimical. So what else is new?

For instance the travel information gathered by GM's OnStar has to be worth a fortune to travel brokers, realtors and hotel operators not to mention petroleum company planners. I wonder how many people that are using the system for "security" are aware that it never sleeps.
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Old 08-26-2010, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
34,270 posts, read 59,588,758 times
Reputation: 33307
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
Not necessarily, for example if you buy a Corvette for $50 with no title you're going to be charged. The "I didn't know" it was stolen argument isn't going to work.



Copyright laws are pretty straight forward, when you create something original it's copyrighted by you the author. For example your post above is copyrighted. The one instance where it wouldn't be is a work for hire when the employer retains copyright.

From there the author can sell the copyright or license his/her product. These are two distinct things. Licensing is what is used to control how it is distributed and the owner of the copyright can set any stipulations they want. Your post for example can be published on these pages because you have granted City Data what is often referred to as soft license when you hit the submit button. Now if they took your post and published it in a book then you'd have grounds to sue.

You can assume that everything is copyrighted and it's your responsibility to determine the status of how it is licensed.
Yes. Yes. And, Yes.
We just had a poster on the CD Raleigh forum asking where he could find a photo of Downtown Raleigh skyline without a watermark. IOW, easier to copy/paste. Clear desire to take without permission.

I have had multiple competitors copy my photos from blogs and Flickr to use for marketing their services in my market. They usually take them down promptly when they realize I will go over their heads to webmasters or supervisors to make that happen.

People who take stealing others' stuff lightly, whether justifying it because they do not like the price, or just because they want it, should experience it from the other side of the taking.
I agree with the perspective that the price of entertainment is not proportionate to the meager value many "artists" offer. So I don't buy it. I also don't steal it.
If price objection is the criteria to justify theft, I have clients who want a million dollar home. They can't pay for it. So, they can rationalize taking without permission because it is overpriced? Probably not, and as it should be.
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